Anthropologica

Edited by Sonja Luehrmann

Published Biannually | E-ISSN 2292-3586 | ISSN 0003-5459‎ Paru en Biannually | E-ISSN 2292-3586 | ISSN 0003-5459‎ Version Française English Version

This Journal is online at:

AnthroOnline and Project Muse

Sign up for Anthropologica Alerts

Join the conversation
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
Cette revue parait en ligne au:

Project Muse

Joignez-vous à la conversation
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email

Anthropologica is a peer-reviewed journal publishing original and ground-breaking scholarly research in all areas of cultural and social anthropological research. Anthropologica’s contributors conduct their research across the globe, providing a comprehensive look into the fieldwork being done by Canadian anthropologists in all parts of the world. Anthropologica publishes articles and book reviews twice a year in both French and English, and welcomes ethnographic writing by non-Canadian scholars who have been identified by the editors as having important contributions to make to Canadian readers.

Continue Reading Read Less

Anthropologica

Sous la direction de Sonja Luehrmann

Published Biannually | E-ISSN 2292-3586 | ISSN 0003-5459‎ Paru en Biannually | E-ISSN 2292-3586 | ISSN 0003-5459‎ Version Française English Version

This Journal is online at:

AnthroOnline and Project Muse

Sign up for Anthropologica Alerts

Join the conversation
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
Cette revue parait en ligne au:

Project Muse

Joignez-vous à la conversation
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email

Anthropologica est une revue à comité de lecture qui publie des recherches académiques originales et d’avant-garde dans tous les secteurs de l’anthropologie sociale et culturelle. Les collaborateurs d’Anthropologica sont actifs aux quatre coins du globe et nous offrent un regard panoramique sur le travail de terrain accompli par les chercheurs canadiens ici et dans le monde. Anthropologica publie des articles et des recensions de livres en deux livraisons annuelles, en français et en anglais, et accueille les contributions ethnographiques d’universitaires non canadiens qui ont été choisies par le comité en fonction de leur intérêt pour des lecteurs canadiens.

Plus Moins
Product Formats

SKU# SKU2883

From: $45.00

* Required Fields

Quick Overview

Anthropologica is a peer-reviewed journal publishing original and ground-breaking scholarly research in all areas of cultural and social anthropological research. Anthropologica’s contributors conduct their research across the globe, providing a comprehensive look into the fieldwork being done by Canadian anthropologists in all parts of the world. Anthropologica publishes articles and book reviews twice a year in both French and English, and welcomes ethnographic writing by non-Canadian scholars who have been identified by the editors as having important contributions to make to Canadian readers.

Anthropologica

Edited by Sonja Luehrmann

Published Biannually | E-ISSN 2292-3586 | ISSN 0003-5459‎ Paru en Biannually | E-ISSN 2292-3586 | ISSN 0003-5459‎ Version Française English Version

This Journal is online at:

AnthroOnline and Project Muse

Sign up for Anthropologica Alerts

Join the conversation
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email
Cette revue parait en ligne au:

Project Muse

Joignez-vous à la conversation
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email

Anthropologica is a peer-reviewed journal publishing original and ground-breaking scholarly research in all areas of cultural and social anthropological research. Anthropologica’s contributors conduct their research across the globe, providing a comprehensive look into the fieldwork being done by Canadian anthropologists in all parts of the world. Anthropologica publishes articles and book reviews twice a year in both French and English, and welcomes ethnographic writing by non-Canadian scholars who have been identified by the editors as having important contributions to make to Canadian readers.

Continue Reading Read Less

Anthropologica est une revue à comité de lecture qui publie des recherches académiques originales et d’avant-garde dans tous les secteurs de l’anthropologie sociale et culturelle. Les collaborateurs d’Anthropologica sont actifs aux quatre coins du globe et nous offrent un regard panoramique sur le travail de terrain accompli par les chercheurs canadiens ici et dans le monde. Anthropologica publie des articles et des recensions de livres en deux livraisons annuelles, en français et en anglais, et accueille les contributions ethnographiques d’universitaires non canadiens qui ont été choisies par le comité en fonction de leur intérêt pour des lecteurs canadiens.

Plus Moins
  • Editorial board

    Editor-in-Chief / Rédactrice en chef

    Sonja Luehrmann
    Simon Fraser University 8888 University Drive
    Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6
    Canada
    Email/courriel : luehrmann@sfu.ca

    Book Review Editor (English) / Rédacteur des comptes rendus (anglais)

    Daniel Tubb
    University of New Brunswick
    Fredericton, NB E3B 5A3
    Canada
    Email/courriel : dtubb@unb.ca

    Editor, French Manuscripts / Rédactrice, manuscrits en français

    Alexandrine Boudreault-Fournier
    University of Victoria
    Victoria, BC N2L 3C5
    Canada
    Email/courriel : alexbf@uvic.ca

    Book Review Editor (French) / Rédactrice des comptes rendus (français)

    Karine Gagné
    University of Guelph
    Guelph, ON N1G 2W1
    Canada
    Email/courriel : gagnek@uoguelph.ca

    Editorial Assistant / Assistante de rédaction

    Jelena Golubovic
    Simon Fraser University 8888 University Drive
    Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6
    Canada
    Email/courriel : jelena_golubovic@sfu.ca

    Editorial Board / Comité de rédation

    Vered Amit
    Sociology and Anthropology, Concordia University

    Gilles Bibeau
    Anthropology, Université de Montréal

    Simon Coleman
    Department for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto

    Regna Darnell
    Anthropology, Western University

    Virginia Dominguez
    Anthropology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Parin Dossa
    Sociology and Anthropology, Simon Fraser University

    Susan Frohlick
    Community, Culture + Global Studies, University of British Columbia

    Natacha Gagné
    Anthropology, Université Laval

    Pauline Gardiner Barber
    Sociology and Anthropology, Dalhousie University

    Ellen Judd
    Anthropology, University of Manitoba

    Michael Lambek
    Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Belinda Leach
    Anthropology and Sociology, University of Guelph

    Harriet Lyons
    Anthropology and Women’s Studies, University of Waterloo

    Theresa McCarthy
    American Studies/Transnational Studies, SUNY (Buffalo)

    Thomas (Tad) McIlwraith
    Sociology and Anthropology, University of Guelph

    Anne Meneley
    Anthropology, Trent University

    David A. B. Murray
    Anthropology, York University

    Scott Simon
    Anthropology, University of Ottawa

    Alan Smart
    Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Calgary

    Ted Swedenburg
    Anthropology, University of Arkansas

    Helena Wulff
    Social Anthropology, Stockholm University

    Immediate Past Editors / Ancien rédacteur immédiat

    Jasmin Habib

  • Open Access Policy

    In response to the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications, Anthropologica has developed a plan to ensure our authors are able to comply with the policy.

    Green Open Access
    Twelve (12) months after publication of the version of record (i.e., the article after copyediting, tagging, typesetting, etc.), the author may deposit a copy of the accepted article in their institutional repository with a DOI or direct link to the version of record. Please let us know when the deposit is made so that we can update our records.

  • Abstracting and indexing

  • Acknowledgements

    Anthropologica gratefully acknowledges the financial support of the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

  • Author resources

    Subject Matter and Scope

    The official publication of the Canadian Anthropology Association, Anthropologica is a bilingual, peer-reviewed journal, publishing original and ground-breaking scholarly research in all areas of cultural and social anthropological research. We encourage submissions from cultural and social anthropologists without preference for any single region of the world or any particular theoretical tradition. Anthropologica publishes articles and book-reviews twice a year in both French and English, and welcomes ethnographic writing by non-Canadian scholars who have been identified by the editors as making important contributions to the field.

    Anthropologica accepts articles written in either English or French. The abstracts of articles are published in both English and French. Abstracts that are submitted in only one language will be translated by Anthropologica. The Introduction to a Special Theme issue is published in both English and French. An Introduction to a Special Theme issues that is submitted in only one language will be translated by Anthropologica.

    The Editorial Advisory Board has made it quite clear that except for CASCA’s award-winning papers (e.g., CASCA Women's Network Award for Student Paper in Feminist Anthropology), Anthropologica will not normally publish graduate student papers as there are venues for graduate student publications.

    Anthropologica Sections

    Anthropologica publishes regular articles, commentaries, and book reviews. Anthropologica issues normally include one Special Theme along with regular articles and one or more feature item, which include Ideas and Anthropological Reflections. On Special Theme submissions, please see below. Invited papers include CASCA’s keynote addresses and select award-winning papers by students and faculty.

    Regular articles express the views of the author(s), supported by scholarly argument and/or scientific evidence on a topic falling within the editorial mandate of Anthropologica. Where relevant, reference should be made to previously published articles in Anthropologica.

    The Ideas section consists of a brief, position paper by a well-known scholar concerning a key concept in anthropology and the social sciences such as “community” and “the state” and short responses by other scholars to that paper. Normally Ideas are between 3500 and 5000 words in length.

    Anthropological Reflections is a feature which invites anthropologists to reflect on their experiences in the field in autobiographical and auto-ethnographic pieces, photo-essays, poetry, travelogues, exchanges with interlocutors, experimental writing, etc. The point of this section is to broaden the scope of our anthropological writing, publishing and reception.

    Practitioner’s Corner invites anthropologists working outside of academia to share their experiences in their practice as public servants, human rights advocates, museum curators, NGO and INGO workers, lawyers, social workers, teachers, etc. These submissions are between 3500 to 5000 words in length.

    Special Theme Proposals Submissions Process

    Anthropologica publishes at least one special theme in each issue. Special Themes normally include a long Introduction to the theme and between 5 to 8 scholarly articles.

    All proposals for a special theme MUST to be submitted to the Editor in Chief and include

    1. a formal introduction to the theme with a detailed discussion of the current debates in the literature and an outline of the contributions that the special theme will make to contemporary anthropological discussions in Canada and beyond (1000 to 2000 words);
    2. the titles and abstracts of the individual articles and their individual contributions to the special theme (approximately 100 to 150 word abstracts); and
    3. short biographical statements by each of the contributors (approximately 100 to 150 words) (Please do not send individual CVs).

    Each special theme issue normally must include at least one paper in French or English, depending on the dominant language of the rest of the collection of articles.

    The Francophone and Anglophone editors first consider every proposal and, if there is interest, it will be sent on to the Editorial Advisory Board for review and approval. The Editorial Advisory Board members may accept the proposal; reject the proposal; or suggest that the proposal be revised and resubmitted. The Editor in Chief is responsible for communicating the decision of the Editorial Advisory Board to the editors of the special theme issue.

    Given that the majority of articles submitted for any special issue normally require revision and resubmission, it has become very difficult to predict when a special issue will make it through the review process. Editors and contributors should expect the process to take at least one annual year from the date of submission. Note as well that one needs to understand that one contribution may hold up an entire issue. Normally, special theme issues are only assigned publication dates once all necessary reviews have been completed.

    All articles are reviewed individually and contributors are asked to communicate the results of their reviews with the special theme editors. Theme editors will work closely with Anthropologica’s Anglophone and/or Francophone editors but ALL publication decisions rests with Anthropologica’s Editor in Chief, including whether an article will be excluded from the final special issue.

    In past, the Editorial Advisory Board has made it clear that except for CASCA’s award-winning papers (e.g. CASCA Women's Network Award for Student Paper in Feminist Anthropology). Anthropologica will not normally publish graduate student papers as there are venues for graduate student publications.

    Manuscript Requirements

    All articles must be the author’s original work, previously unpublished, and not being reviewed for publication with another journal.

    Regular articles lengths should be at least 5000 words but should not exceed 9,000 words, exclusive of tables, figures, and references. Authors are asked to ensure that the manuscript is clear of any major grammatical and spelling errors. There is no editing or line editing support provided to individual authors. An article may be immediately rejected on grounds it does not meet Anthropologica’s and the University of Toronto Press’ publication standards.

    Upon initial submission, all supporting files including figures and illustrations, tables, and images must be submitted.

    Tables are to be placed in the submission file at the end of the manuscript, with each table numbered consecutively in the order in which they are mentioned in the text.

    Figures, illustrations, and other images must be submitted as separate files.

    Anthropologica discourages the use of italics and quotation marks for emphasis. Please use short and meaningful subheadings to break up long sections of text.

    Manuscripts should be submitted as files prepared in MS Word. The manuscript should be double-spaced and formatted for 81⁄2 x 11” (21.5 x 28 cm) paper, with 1” (2.54 cm) margins on both sides of the page.

    All Anthropologica submissions, reviews, and editorial work are completed through our online peer review management system, ScholarOne Manuscripts.

    Through ScholarOne, Anthropologica’s editorial team will acknowledge receipt of the manuscript and eventually communicate the decision of the Editorial Committee.

    Peer Review Process

    Anthropologica uses a double-blind peer review process.

    Author(s)’ Commitments

    The editing and peer review process require a substantial commitment of time by Anthropologica’s editors and reviewers. There is NO managing editor or staff working for the journal. Submitting a manuscript to Anthropologica implies the contributor(s)’ commitment to publish in the journal. Authors must certify in writing that neither the article submitted nor a version of it has been published, nor is it publicly available online, nor is it being considered for publication elsewhere, nor will be submitted elsewhere for consideration for publication while the manuscript is under review by the journal. Such certification must accompany the manuscript. Authors thereby agree to transfer their copyright to the publisher of the journal.

    Blinding

    Anthropologica uses a double-blind peer review process.

    Each and every manuscript must therefore be properly blinded in preparation for submission.

    Blinding a manuscript entails removing all references to your name on the cover page, the abstract, any publications, whether in text and in the bibliography. References that are likely to suggest the identity of the author (e.g., to unpublished work by the author) should also be avoided.

    Authors are cautioned that word processing software such as MS Word and JPEG automatically attaches identifying information (i.e., author’s name and institutional affiliation) to every file created or revised. Please remove any information that identifies you from the “Properties” area of the file.

    A cover page listing authorship, institutional affiliation, acknowledgements, and the date of submission of the article should be included along with a full manuscript in a separate file.

    It is the responsibility of the contributing author to blind the paper for submission.

    Upon acceptance of the article for publication, the author will be required to provide a revised version of the text in which identifying references have been integrated into the text and the bibliography.

    Selection of Reviewers

    Each article that is submitted to Anthropologica is evaluated by the Anglophone or Francophone Editors (depending on the language of submission). Based on their initial assessment, the article will be immediately rejected, sent back to the author with suggestions for revisions (which may be minor or major), or sent on for review.

    In order to assist the editors with the selection of reviewers, all contributors are asked to list a minimum of 3 potential reviewers with their submission. Authors must avoid any and all conflict of interest with their recommendations. A reviewer should NOT be suggested if he/she:

    1. is from the same institution, or organization as the applicant or interact with the applicant in the course of his/her duties;
    2. has direct involvement in the proposal being discussed;
    3. has collaborated, been a co-applicant, or published with the applicant(s) within the past 5 years;
    4. has been a student or supervisor of the applicant(s) within the last 10 years; or
    5. is a close personal friend or relative of the applicant

    Upon the receipt of all reviewers’ reports, the contributor will receive one of the following decision letters from the editor: accepted, accepted conditional on minor revisions, rejected with an invitation to make major revisions and resubmit, or rejected.

    Documentation

    Anthropologica follows the Chicago Manual of Style (CMS, 16th edition), author-date style. Our house style for spelling and word breaks is the Canadian Oxford Dictionary (CanOD), with the exception of “ise” rather than “ize” spellings (for example, globalise, globalisation, realise, analyse, evangelise, etc.).

    References

    References should appear at the end of the article. Sources should be listed in alphabetical order, letter by letter. An em-dash can replace the surname of an author who appears more than once. If the author appears with co-authors, the surname must be spelled out again. Multiple sources by the same author are listed chronologically by year, beginning with the oldest source. Sources from the same year should be distinguished by using a, b, c. Each source should end with a period.

    The references must include all references in the text and must not include any items not cited in the text. The use of “et al.” is not acceptable in the References appendix; list names of all authors using full first names (except for authors who always publish using only their initials).

    For journal style as to the capitalization/non-capitalization of titles, please follow the examples below.

    If the cited material is unpublished but accepted for publication, use “forthcoming” with name of journal or publisher; otherwise use “unpublished.”

    The following examples of reference list entries may prove useful:

    Journals:

    • Augé, Marc. 1986. “L’anthropologie et la maladie.” L’Homme 26(1-2): 15.

    Books:

    • Smith, Gavin. 1999. Confronting the Present: Towards a Politically Engaged Anthropology. Oxford: Berg.
    • Saillant, Francine, and Manon Boulianne, eds. 2003. Transformations sociales, genre et santé: Perspectives critiques et comparatives. Paris et Québec: L’Harmattan et les Presses Universitaires de l’Université de Laval.

    Chapters in Books/Edited Volumes:

    • Muratorio, Blanca M. 1995. “Amazonian Windows to the Past: Recovering Women’s Histories from the Ecuadorian Upper Amazon.” In Articulating Hidden Histories: Exploring the Influence of Eric R. Wolf, edited by J. Schneider and R. Rapp, 322-335. Berkeley: University of California Press.

    Government report or other publication:

    • Statistics Canada. 2001. 2002 Census Dictionary Reference, Catalogue No 92-378-XPE. Ottawa: Statistics Canada.

    Translated titles:

    References to foreign works should include a translation in square brackets.

    • Pirumova, N.M. 1977. Zemskoe liberal’noe dvizhenie: Sotsial’nye ko¬rni i evoliutsiia do nachala XX veka [The zemstvo Liberal Movement: Its Social Roots and Evolution to the Beginning of the Twentieth Century]. Moscow: Izdatel’stvo Nauka.

    In-text citations

    All source references are to be identified at the appropriate point in the text by the last name of the author, year of publication, and pagination where needed. Identify subsequent citations of the same source in the same way as the first.

    In-text citations should follow the following format:

    If the author’s name is in the text, follow it with the year in parentheses.

    • Duncan (1959)

    If author’s name is not in the text, insert in parentheses the last name and year.

    • (Gouldner 1963)

    Pagination follows year of publication after a comma and a space.

    • Kuhn (1970, 71)

    For multiple authors, use “and colleagues” in the text and “et al.” in the notes when there are four or more authors but list each author in the reference list. When two authors have the same last name, include initials in the text.

    Separate a series of references with semicolons and enclose them within a single pair of parentheses.

    • (Burgess 1968; Marwell et al. 1971, 386–87; Cohen 1962)

    If there is more than one reference to the same author and year, distinguish them by the letters a, b, etc., added to the year.

    • Levy (1965a, 331–332)

    Author-date citations are placed alphabetically, and in the case of more than one citation by the same author, they are placed in chronological order from oldest to newest. Multiple authors are separated by semi-colons, and multiple works by the same author are separated by commas.

      (Beazley 1938, 13; Mertens 2006, 191; Oakley 1997, 1–3). (see Fairbanks 1907, 1914).

    Footnotes and Endnotes

    Endnotes are reserved for extraneous information by the author as well as for citations of primary sources, including archival material, legislation, law cases, conventions, treaties, and websites. If, in addition to the publication details of primary source material, there is a website given where the primary materials are available to be viewed, then the website for the primary documents should be cited in the reference list.

    Where to avoid notes: Placement of a note number in chapter titles or headings is strongly discouraged. Instead, position the note at the end of the first sentence or paragraph of the section if it doesn’t disturb sense.

    Epigraphs do not take note numbers. Only the author and title of the work need be given, or for historical quotation, speaker and date. If the source is more complex and requires further documentation or explanation, place an unnumbered note at the beginning of the notes for that article.

    Additional Elements for Submission

    Contact Information

    Include a cover page separate from the main file providing authorship, institutional affiliation, acknowledgements, and the date of submission of the article. Please also provide full contact information for the corresponding author(s).

    CV/Biographical Statement

    Include a CV or a biographical statement separate from the main file outlining academic qualifications, past experiences and research interests.

    Abstract and Keywords

    Your abstract must be fewer than 200 words and written in the language of the paper. It should be a brief summary of the key points of the article, without the use of phrases such as “In this article...”; “The author...”; “The article is about....”

    Provide five to seven keywords positioned a few spaces beneath your abstract. The text body should then follow on a separate page. Using keywords will enhance discoverability through Anthropologica, search engines, and databases.

    Letters of Permission

    Provide a copy of permission to use copyrighted material, if applicable. A forwarded email is sufficient. Please note that failure to include letters of permission to use copyrighted material will, at the very least, delay the publication of the manuscript until the letters of permission have been received by University of Toronto Press.

    UTP requires the formal written permission from the copyright holder to publish images (including screen captures and film stills), videos, excerpts from poetry or songs, and epigraphs. You are responsible for any costs associated with those permissions. Permissions must be forwarded to UTP no later than the copy-editing stage in the publishing of your article.

    When asking for permission from copyright holders, note that UTP requires permission to publish the work, in perpetuity, in print, online, and any other form and in any media now known or hereafter devised, as well as through third-party aggregators (electronic database providers) such as Project MUSE. Our agreements with third-party aggregators require that we have obtained permission for all copyrighted material included in our content.

    You must pay any costs associated with purchasing image licenses from copyright holders (e.g., online image databases).

    Note that UTP publishes under Canadian copyright law, not US copyright law. “Fair use” does not apply under Canadian copyright law. The Canadian equivalent is called “fair dealing.” For more information on fair dealing, see section 29, “Exceptions,” especially sub-sections 29.1– 29.3, which deal with fair dealing.

    Tables and Figures

    Tables should appear at the end of the manuscript with each table numbered consecutively in the order in which they are mentioned in the text. Figures should be provided as separate files; see below for details. In the text, indicate exactly where each table and figure belongs. Use the phrase, “Table/Figure [1] about here” in the approximate place where your table or figure should appear in the final copy. The captions for all tables and figures should be included here as well.

    Tables

    Tables should be prepared in Word (not Excel) using the Tables function (i.e., not created manually using drawn lines, tabs or spaces). Each table must include a descriptive title and headings to columns. Gather general footnotes to tables as “Note:” or “Notes:”, and use a, b, c, etc., for specific footnotes. Table footnotes are appended only to a specific table. Asterisks * and/or ** indicate significance at the 5 percent and 1 percent levels, respectively.

    At the stage of typesetting, tables should be put into a Word file separate from the file containing the text of the article (one file for all tables).

    Figures

    The typesetting stage requires that illustrations be provided without their captions as a high- resolution graphics file (one file per illustration).

    High resolution JPEG, TIFF, and EPS are the preferred graphics file formats. All figure files should be no less than 4 inches wide and 300 dpi or higher (or at least 28 inches wide). Important: If you are unsure of the resolution of your image, please check it in your image software.

    • Microsoft Photo Editor: Go to File/Properties/Resolution
    • Photoshop: Go to Image/Image Size/Document Size

    For charts and line drawings (but not photographs), PDF or Excel files are accepted; each chart must be in a separate file.

    Producing tables, graphs, and illustrations is costly and authors are asked to minimize their use without sacrificing clarity.

    Please note that the University of Toronto Press can present colour images in the online version of Anthropologica at no cost to the author. Video clips illustrating your thesis, such as this one can also be featured alongside your Anthropologica article online.

    Upon acceptance of the manuscript, authors will be required to obtain copyright permission for all images being used in their article or for the cover of the journal.

    Queries

    “How to Alienate Your Editor: A Practical Guide for Established Authors,” written by Stephen K. Donovan and published in the Journal of Scholarly Publishing, is an excellent article on classic mistakes made during the submission process. Also useful is “Surviving Referees’ Reports," written by Brian Martin and also published in Journal of Scholarly Publishing.

  • Permission information

    Permissions Inquiries

    University of Toronto Press
    5201 Dufferin Street
    Toronto, ON M3H 5T8 Canada
    Tel: (416) 667–7777 ext: 7849
    Fax: (416) 667–7881
    Email: journal.permissions@utpress.utoronto.ca

  • Comité de rédaction

    Editor-in-Chief / Rédactrice en chef

    Sonja Luehrmann
    Simon Fraser University 8888 University Drive
    Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6
    Canada
    Email/courriel : luehrmann@sfu.ca

    Book Review Editor (English) / Rédacteur des comptes rendus (anglais)

    Daniel Tubb
    University of New Brunswick
    Fredericton, NB E3B 5A3
    Canada
    Email/courriel : dtubb@unb.ca

    Editor, French Manuscripts / Rédactrice, manuscrits en français

    Alexandrine Boudreault-Fournier
    University of Victoria
    Victoria, BC N2L 3C5
    Canada
    Email/courriel : alexbf@uvic.ca

    Book Review Editor (French) / Rédactrice des comptes rendus (français)

    Karine Gagné
    University of Guelph
    Guelph, ON N1G 2W1
    Canada
    Email/courriel : gagnek@uoguelph.ca

    Editorial Assistant / Assistante de rédaction

    Jelena Golubovic
    Simon Fraser University 8888 University Drive
    Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6
    Canada
    Email/courriel : jelena_golubovic@sfu.ca

    Editorial Board / Comité de rédation

    Vered Amit
    Sociology and Anthropology, Concordia University

    Gilles Bibeau
    Anthropology, Université de Montréal

    Simon Coleman
    Department for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto

    Regna Darnell
    Anthropology, Western University

    Virginia Dominguez
    Anthropology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

    Parin Dossa
    Sociology and Anthropology, Simon Fraser University

    Susan Frohlick
    Community, Culture + Global Studies, University of British Columbia

    Natacha Gagné
    Anthropology, Université Laval

    Pauline Gardiner Barber
    Sociology and Anthropology, Dalhousie University

    Ellen Judd
    Anthropology, University of Manitoba

    Michael Lambek
    Anthropology, University of Toronto

    Belinda Leach
    Anthropology and Sociology, University of Guelph

    Harriet Lyons
    Anthropology and Women’s Studies, University of Waterloo

    Theresa McCarthy
    American Studies/Transnational Studies, SUNY (Buffalo)

    Thomas (Tad) McIlwraith
    Sociology and Anthropology, University of Guelph

    Anne Meneley
    Anthropology, Trent University

    David A. B. Murray
    Anthropology, York University

    Scott Simon
    Anthropology, University of Ottawa

    Alan Smart
    Anthropology and Archaeology, University of Calgary

    Ted Swedenburg
    Anthropology, University of Arkansas

    Helena Wulff
    Social Anthropology, Stockholm University

    Immediate Past Editors / Ancien rédacteur immédiat

    Jasmin Habib

  • Politique sur le libre accès

    En réponse à l’adoption de la Politique des trois organismes sur le libre accès aux publications, Anthropologica a mis au point un plan pour permettre à ses auteurs de s’y conformer.

    Voie verte
    Douze (12) mois suivant la publication de la version finale (c.-à-d. révisée, mise en page, etc.), l’auteur peut déposer une copie de l’article acceptée dans le registre de son établissement avec un lien direct ou un identificateur d’objets numériques (DOI). Prière de nous informer du dépôt afin que nous puissions mettre à jour nos dossiers.

  • Résumés et indexation

  • Remerciements

    Anthropologica est très reconnaissante envers le Conseil de recherches en sciences humaines du Canada pour leur soutien.

  • Pour les auteurs

    Objet et champ d’application

    La publication officielle de la Société canadienne d'anthropologie, Anthropologica est une revue évaluée par des pairs qui publie des recherches universitaires originales et novatrices dans tous les domaines de la recherche anthropologique culturelle et sociale. Anthropologica publie des articles et des revues de littérature d’ouvrages, deux fois par année, en français et en anglais, ainsi que les écrits ethnographiques de chercheurs internationaux identifiés par les éditeurs comme ayant des contributions importantes pour le lectorat canadien.

    Anthropologica accepte les écrits en anglais ou en français. Les résumés des articles sont publiés dans les deux langues, en anglais et en français. Les résumés soumis dans une seule langue seront traduits par Anthropologica. Les Introductions des numéros thématiques sont publiées dans les deux langues. Une Introduction qui est soumise dans une des deux langues sera traduite dans l’autre langue par Anthropologica.

    Anthropologica est un forum de discussion évalué par les pairs où sont présentés des propos et des exposés originaux dans le domaine de l’anthropologie. Anthropologica encourage les propositions des anthropologues de l’anthropologie culturelle et sociale, sans privilégier une région quelconque du monde. De plus, Anthropologica ne se restreint à aucune tradition théorique particulière.

    Les différentes sections d’Anthropologica

    Anthropologica publie régulièrement des articles, des commentaires et des critiques de livres. Des consignes spécifiques ont été définies pour les critiques d’ouvrages. Les numéros d’Anthropologica contiennent une ou plusieurs sections telles que Idées et Réflexions anthropologiques. Pour la soumission des Sujets thématiques, veuillez voir plus bas. Les articles invités incluent la conférence plénière de la CASCA ainsi que les articles d’étudiants et de collègues ayant gagné des prix.

    La section Idées consiste en un bref article par un(e) anthropologue de renom, notamment au sujet d’un concept clef en anthropologie et dans les sciences sociales tel que « communauté » ou « l’état », ainsi que d’une courte réponse à cet article par des collègues. Normalement, la section Idées compte entre 3500 et 5000 mots.

    La section Réflexions anthropologiques invite les anthropologues à réfléchir sur leurs expériences de terrain à partir d’un texte autobiographique et auto-ethnographique, d’un essai- photo, de poésie, de carnets de voyages, d’échanges avec les interlocuteurs, d’écritures expérimentales, etc. Il s’agit d’élargir la portée des écrits anthropologiques, leur publication et leur réception.

    La section Le Coin des Praticiens invite les anthropologues qui travaillent à l’extérieur du milieu universitaire à partager leurs expériences professionnelles, par exemple, à titre de fonctionnaires, de défenseurs des droits de la personne, de conservateurs de musées, de travailleurs d’ONG nationales ou internationales, d’avocats, de travailleurs sociaux, d’enseignants, etc. Ces soumissions doivent compter entre 3500 et 5000 mots.

    Propositions d’un sujet thématique et processus de soumission

    Anthropologica publie des numéros thématiques qui incluent habituellement une longue introduction au thème et de 5 à 8 articles.

    Toutes les propositions de sujets thématiques doivent être soumises à la Rédactrice ou au Rédacteur en chef et inclure :

    1. une introduction formelle du thème avec une revue de littérature détaillée sur les débats actuels, ainsi qu’un sommaire portant sur les contributions que ce sujet thématique apportera aux discussions anthropologiques au Canada et ailleurs (de 1000 à 2000 mots) ;
    2. les titres et les résumés des articles individuels et leurs contributions à la thématique (des résumés d’environ 100 à 150 mots) ; et
    3. une courte description biographique de chacun des contributeurs (approximativement 100-150 mots – veuillez ne pas envoyer de CV individuel).

    Chaque numéro thématique doit normalement inclure au moins un article en français ou en anglais, selon la langue dominante de l’ensemble des articles du numéro.

    Toute proposition est initialement examinée par les rédacteurs (francophones et anglophones) et s’il y a lieu, sera envoyée ensuite au Conseil consultatif de rédaction pour évaluation et approbation. Les membres du Conseil consultatif de rédaction accepteront la proposition, la rejetteront ou demanderont que la proposition soit révisée et soumise à nouveau. La Rédactrice ou le Rédacteur en chef est responsable de communiquer la décision du Conseil consultatif de rédaction aux éditeurs du numéro thématique.

    Étant donné que la majorité des articles soumis pour les numéros thématiques requièrent habituellement une révision et une nouvelle soumission, il est devenu très difficile de prédire à quel moment le processus d’évaluation d’un numéro spécial sera finalisé. Les contributeurs peuvent s’attendre à ce que le processus nécessite au moins une année à partir de la date de soumission. Notez également qu’un article soumis dans le cadre d’une proposition thématique peut repousser la date de publication de la proposition s’il requière de nombreuses révisions.

    Tous les articles sont évalués individuellement et l’on demande aux contributeurs de communiquer les résultats de leurs évaluations avec les éditeurs du numéro thématique. Les éditeurs du numéro thématique travailleront en étroite collaboration avec les Rédacteurs anglophones et/ou francophones d’Anthropologica, mais TOUTES les décisions de publication demeurent à la discrétion de la Rédactrice ou du Rédacteur en chef d’Anthropologica, y compris pour un article qui serait exclu de la version finale du numéro thématique.

    Dans le passé, le Conseil consultatif de rédaction a clairement indiqué qu’à l’exception des récipiendaires du concours du Prix de communication de la CASCA (par exemple, au concours du Prix étudiant du Réseau des femmes de la CASCA pour une communication d’un-e étudiant-e en anthropologie féministe), Anthropologica ne publie généralement pas les communications des étudiants gradués parce qu’elles sont en devenir pour les publications des étudiants diplômés.

    Exigences du manuscrit

    Tous les articles doivent être le travail original d’un auteur. Un article ne doit jamais avoir été publié ou évalué par une autre revue en vue de publication.

    Les articles habituels ne doivent pas dépasser 9000 mots ou 35 pages à double interligne, sans compter les tableaux, les figures et les références bibliographiques. Le commentaire exprime le point de vue de(s) auteur(s), soutenu par un argumentaire académique et/ou des éléments scientifiques sur un sujet précis relevant de la ligne éditoriale d’Anthropologica.

    Tous les fichiers associés au manuscrit, incluant les figures, les illustrations, les tableaux et les images, devront être envoyés lors de la soumission initiale. Les tableaux doivent être placés à la fin du manuscrit dans le fichier soumis et numérotés dans l’ordre où ils sont mentionnés dans le texte. Les figures, les illustrations et les autres images doivent être soumises dans des fichiers séparés.

    Les manuscrits doivent être soumis sous forme de fichiers MS Word, WordPerfect et les textes ordinaires sont aussi acceptés. Les manuscrits doivent être au format papier de 81⁄2 x 11” (21.5 x 28 cm), avec un double espace et des marges de 1” (2.54 cm) de chaque côté de la page.

    Toutes les soumissions, les évaluations et le travail de rédaction d’Anthropologica sont gérés par l’intermédiaire de notre système d’évaluation par les pairs en ligne, ScholarOne Manuscripts.

    Anthropologica accusera réception des manuscrits et communiquera la décision du Comité de rédaction.

    Processus d’évaluation par les pairs

    Engagement des auteurs

    Le processus d’évaluation des manuscrits requiert beaucoup de temps de la part des évaluateurs et du personnel éditorial de la revue. Anthropologica n’a pas de rédacteur ou de rédactrice oeuvrant à temps plein pour la revue. Soumettre un manuscrit à Anthropologica implique un engagement de la part des auteurs de publier leurs travaux dans la revue. Les auteurs doivent attester que l’article soumis ou une version de celui-ci n’a jamais été publié auparavant, qu’il n’existe aucune version publique en ligne, que l’article n’a jamais été considéré comme une publication ailleurs, qu’il ne sera pas soumis à d’autres revues pour fins de publication tandis que le manuscrit est en cours d’évaluation auprès d’Anthropologica. Une telle attestation doit accompagner le manuscrit. Les auteurs acceptent ainsi d’accorder leur droit d’auteur à l’éditeur de la revue.

    Anonymat

    Anthropologica a recours à un double processus d’évaluation anonyme par les pairs.

    L’anonymisation des manuscrits implique de supprimer toutes les références à votre nom, les identifications des publications, ainsi que les composants et les participants de vos recherches qui permettraient de vous identifier. Une page de couverture mentionnant le ou les auteurs, leur affiliation, les remerciements et la date de soumission devra être ajoutée dans un fichier séparé. Seul le titre du manuscrit apparaîtra dans le document contenant le texte et son résumé.

    Il convient de rappeler, à cet égard, que les logiciels de traitement de texte, tels que MS Word, et les images en JPEG, annexent automatiquement les informations d’identification (le nom de l'auteur et de son institution d’appartenance, par exemple) à tout fichier qu'on vient de créer ou de réviser. Veuillez supprimer du champ « Propriétés » toute information qui pourrait permettre de vous identifier. Les auteurs doivent supprimer ces informations avant de soumettre les documents à Anthropologica.

    Dès que l’article sera accepté pour publication, l’auteur devra fournir une version révisée du texte dans laquelle les références identifiées auront été intégrées dans le texte et dans l’annexe des Références.

    Sélection des évaluateurs

    Chaque article soumis à Anthropologica est évalué par le rédacteur ou la rédactrice francophone ou anglophone – selon la langue dans laquelle le texte a été soumis. À partir de leur lecture initiale, l’article peut être immédiatement rejeté, renvoyé à l’auteur avec des suggestions de révisions majeures ou mineures ou envoyé pour évaluation.

    Afin d’aider la rédaction, nous demandons à ce que les auteurs suggèrent au moins trois noms d’évaluateurs potentiels. Cependant, l’auteur doit éviter les conflits d’intérêts.

    Ainsi, un évaluateur ou une évaluatrice ne doit pas être suggéré(e) si il ou elle :

    1. est issu de la même institution ou organisation que l’auteur ou qui interagit au cours de son/sa responsabilité ;
    2. a une implication directe dans la proposition dont il est question ;
    3. a collaboré en tant que co-auteur ou publié avec l’auteur au cours des cinq dernières années ;
    4. a été l’étudiant(e) ou le/la superviseur(e) de l’auteur au cours des dix dernières années ; ou
    5. est parenté(e) ou est un(e) ami(e) personnel(el) de l’auteur.

    Après réception des rapports d’évaluation, vous recevrez l’une des réponses suivantes : « accepté tel quel », « accepté sous condition de révisions mineures », « refusé avec une invitation à effectuer des corrections majeures et une nouvelle soumission », ou « refusé ».

    Documentation

    Anthropologica utilise les normes d’édition du Chicago Manual of Style (CMS, 16e édition), le style auteur-date.

    Références

    Les références bibliographiques doivent apparaître à la fin de l’article. Les sources doivent être notées par ordre alphabétique, lettre par lettre. Le tiret cadratin peut remplacer le nom d’un auteur lorsqu’il est cité plus d’une fois. Si l’auteur apparaît avec un ou des co-auteurs, son nom doit à nouveau être annoté. Plusieurs sources ayant le même auteur doivent être mentionnées chronologiquement par année de parution, en commençant par la source la plus ancienne. Les sources de la même année devront être distinguées par les lettres a, b, c, noté après l’année de parution. Toutes les sources devront se terminer par un point.

    Les références bibliographiques doivent inclure toutes les sources citées dans le texte et ne doivent pas inclure ce qui n’est pas cité dans le texte. L’utilisation de « et al. » n’est pas acceptée dans l’annexe des Références : doivent être notés les noms et prénoms de tous les auteurs (à l’exception des auteurs qui publient toujours avec leurs seules initiales).

    Pour le style de la revue comme l’écriture des titres en lettres majuscules, veuillez suivre les exemples ci-dessous.

    Si le matériel cité n’a pas été publié, mais a été accepté pour publication, utilisez « à paraître » avec le nom de la revue ou de la maison d’édition, ou « non publié ».

    Les exemples de références suivants peuvent être utiles :

    Revues

    • Augé, Marc, 1986. « L’anthropologie et la maladie ». L’Homme, 26 (1-2) : 15.

    Ouvrages :

    • Smith, Gavin, 1999. Confronting the Present : Towards a Politically Engaged Anthropology. Oxford, Berg.
    • Saillant, Francine et Manon Boulianne (dir.), 2003. Transformations sociales, genre et santé : Perspectives critiques et comparatives. Paris et Québec, L’Harmattan et les Presses Universitaires de l’Université de Laval.

    Chapitres de livres / Volume édités

    • Muratorio, Blanca M, 1995. « Amazonian Windows to the Past : Recovering Women’s Histories from the Ecuadorian Upper Amazon ». In J. Schneider and R. Rapp (dir.), Articulating Hidden Histories: Exploring the Influence of Eric R. Wolf, p. 322-335. Berkeley, University of California Press.

    Rapports gouvernementaux et autres publications

    • Statistics Canada, 2001. 2002 Census Dictionary Reference, Catalogue No 92-378-XPE. Ottawa, Statistics Canada.

    Titres traduits

    Références de publications étrangères doivent inclure la traduction française du titre entre crochets.

    • Pirumova, N.M, 1977. Zemskoe liberal’noe dvizhenie: Sotsial’nye ko¬rni i evoliutsiia do nachala XX veka [The zemstvo Liberal Movement: Its Social Roots and Evolution to the Beginning of the Twentieth Century]. Moscow, Izdatel’stvo Nauka.

    Références aux citations dans le texte

    Toutes les références bibliographiques doivent être identifiées à l’endroit approprié dans le texte, par le nom de famille de l’auteur, l’année de publication et la référence de la page lorsque nécessaire. Les citations d’une même source doivent être identifiées de la même manière dès la première mention.

    Dans le texte, les citations doivent suivre le format suivant :

    Si le nom de l’auteur est dans le texte, le faire suivre par l’année de parution entre parenthèses.

    • Duncan (1959)

    Si le nom de l’auteur n’est pas dans le texte, insérez entre parenthèses le nom et l’année.

    • (Gouldner 1963)

    La référence de la page doit suivre l’année de parution, suivie par une virgule.

    • Kuhn (1970, 71)

    Pour les auteurs multiples, utilisez « et collègues » dans le texte et « et al. » dans les notes quand il y a quatre auteurs ou plus, mais notez chaque auteur dans la bibliographie. Quand deux auteurs ont le même nom, inclure leurs initiales dans le texte.

    Séparer les sources d’une même série par des deux-points et placer cette série de références entre parenthèses.

    • (Burgess 1968 ; Marwell et al. 1971, 386-87 ; Cohen 1962)

    S’il y a plus d’une référence ayant le même auteur et la même date de parution, les distinguer avec les lettres a, b, c. ajouté après la date.

    • Levy (1965a, 331–332)

    Les sources auteur-date sont placées par ordre alphabétique, et dans le cas où plus d’une source d’un même auteur, elles seront notées chronologiquement de la plus ancienne à la plus récente. Les auteurs multiples doivent être séparés par des deux points et les publications d’un même auteur par une virgule.

    • (Beazley 1938, 13 ; Mertens 2006, 191 ; Oakley 1997, 1-3).
    • (voir Fairbanks 1907, 1914).

    Notes de pied de page et notes de fin de page

    Les notes de fin de page sont réservées pour des informations complémentaires de l’auteur, ainsi que pour des citations de sources primaires, incluant matériel d’archive, législation, lois, conventions, traités et sites internet. Si, un lien vers un site web est donné en complément des informations de publication de la source primaire et que les données primaires sont disponibles sur ce site, alors les références du site web devront être mentionnées dans la bibliographie.

    Où éviter les notes de fin de page : éviter de placer un numéro de la note dans le titre ou le sous- titre d’un chapitre. Positionnez plutôt la note à la fin de la première phrase ou du paragraphe de la section à condition que le sens ne soit pas altéré.

    Les exergues ne doivent pas contenir de numéros de notes. Seuls l’auteur et le titre du travail doivent être donnés ou, dans le cas d’une citation historique, l’auteur et la date. Si la source est plus complexe et requiert davantage de documents ou d’explications, placez une note sans numéro au début de l’ensemble des notes de l’article.

    Informations complémentaires requises

    Coordonnées

    Inclure une page de couverture séparée du fichier principal où devront apparaître le nom et prénom(s) de l’auteur, son affiliation institutionnelle, les remerciements s’il y a lieu et la date de soumission de l’article. Veuillez également fournir les coordonnées complètes de(s) l’auteur(s) à des fins de correspondance.

    CV/Informations biographiques

    Inclure un CV ou des informations biographiques dans un fichier séparé, en soulignant les compétences, les expériences académiques et les intérêts de recherche.

    Résumés et mots-clés

    Votre résumé, rédigé dans la langue de votre article, ne doit pas dépasser 200 mots. Le résumé doit être court et doit reprendre les éléments clés de l’article. Les formulations suivantes doivent être évitées : « Dans cet article... », « L’auteur... », « Cet article est au sujet de... ».

    Cinq mots-clés doivent être inclus quelques lignes en dessous du résumé. Le corps du texte débute ensuite sur une page séparée. Ces mots-clés permettront d’identifier l’article dans les bases de données, les moteurs de recherche et Anthropologica.

    Lettres d’autorisation

    Fournir une copie de la lettre d’autorisation pour utiliser des documents soumis aux droits d’auteur, s’il y a lieu. L’envoi d’un courriel est suffisant. Notez que le refus d’inclure la lettre d’autorisation de l’utilisation de documents soumis aux droits d’auteur pourrait retarder la publication du manuscrit, tant que la lettre d’autorisation n’aura pas été reçue par les Presses de l’Université de Toronto (University of Toronto Press, UTP).

    UTP demande l’autorisation formelle du détenteur des droits d’auteur des illustrations (y compris des captures d’écran et des documents vidéo), des vidéos, des extraits de poésie ou de chanson et des épigraphes. Tous les coûts associés aux droits de reproduction relèvent de votre responsabilité. Les autorisations doivent être acheminées à l’UTP avant que la phase d’édition/révision de votre article ne soit effectuée.

    Lors de la demande d’autorisation des droits d’auteurs, notez que l’UTP requiert la permission de publier l’œuvre, à perpétuité, sur papier, en ligne et sous toute autre forme, ainsi que dans tout média actuel ou à venir, ou dans des tiers-agrégateurs (fournisseurs de données numériques) tels que Project MUSE. Nos ententes avec des tiers-agrégateurs de données nécessitent que nous ayons obtenu toutes les permissions requises pour les documents soumis à des droits d’auteurs.

    Vous devrez payer tous les coûts associés à l’obtention des droits d’auteurs auprès de leurs propriétaires (par exemple, les bases de données d’images en ligne).

    Notez que l’UTP publie selon la loi canadienne des droits d’auteurs, non sous la loi états-unienne des droits- d’auteurs. L’« usage acceptable » (fair use) ne s’applique pas sous la loi canadienne des droits d’auteur. Au Canada, l’équivalent est nommé « utilisation équitable » (fair dealing). Pour davantage d’informations sur l’utilisation équitable, voir la section 29, « Exceptions », et en particulier les sous-sections 29.1–29.3.

    Tableaux et illustrations

    Les tableaux doivent apparaître à la fin du manuscrit, numéroté chacun successivement dans l’ordre selon lesquels ils sont mentionnés dans le texte. Les illustrations doivent être fournies dans un fichier séparé; voir les détails ci-dessous. Dans le texte, indiquez précisément où se place chaque tableau et illustration. Utilisez la phrase « Tableau/Illustration [1] ici » à l’endroit approximatif où devrait apparaître le tableau ou l’illustration dans la version finale. La légende de tous les tableaux et illustrations doit être insérée à cet endroit.

    Tableaux

    Les tableaux doivent être préparés en format Word (non Excel) en utilisant la fonction Tableau (c’est-à-dire ne pas créer manuellement un tableau en insérant des lignes, des colonnes ou des espaces). Chaque tableau doit inclure un titre descriptif et des intitulés de colonnes.

    Lors de l’assemblage, les tableaux doivent être placés dans un fichier Word séparé de celui qui contient le texte de l’article (un seul fichier pour tous les tableaux).

    Illustrations

    La phase d’assemblage requiert que toutes les illustrations soient fournies, sans leur légende, en haute résolution d’image (un fichier par illustration).

    Les formats haute résolution d’image en JPEG, TIFF et EPS sont privilégiés. Toutes les illustrations doivent être supérieures à 4 pouces de large et 300dpi au plus (ou jusqu’à 28 pouces de large). Important : si vous n’êtes pas sûr(e) de la résolution de vos images, veuillez vérifier leurs propriétés numériques.

    Microsoft Photo Editor : Allez dans Fichier/Propertiétés/Résolution Photoshop : Allez dans Image/Image Taille/Taille du Document

    Pour les graphiques et dessins de lignes (en dehors des photographies), les fichiers PDF ou Excel sont acceptés ; chaque graphique doit être dans un fichier séparé.

    Concevoir des tableaux, des graphiques et des illustrations est payant et nous demandons aux auteurs de minimiser leur utilisation sans nuire à la clarté.

    Notez que les Presses de l’Université de Toronto peuvent présenter les images en couleurs sur la version en ligne d’Anthropologica sans aucuns frais pour l’auteur.

    Des vidéoclips illustrent votre thèse comme celui-ci : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3T6vuoQdY6Q&feature=related, can also be featured alongside your Anthropologica article online.

    Dès la réception du manuscrit, les auteurs devront acquérir les autorisations des droits d’auteur pour toutes les images reproduites dans cet article ou pour la couverture de la revue.

    Lectures utiles

    How to Alienate Your Editor : A Practical Guide for Established Authors, écrit par Stephen K. Donovan et publié dans le Journal of Scholarly Publishing, est un excellent article sur les erreurs généralement faites durant le processus de soumission d’un article.

    Surviving Referees’ Reports, écrit par Brian Martin et publié également dans le Journal of Scholarly Publishing est aussi très utile.

  • Renseignements sur les droits de copie

    University of Toronto Press
    5201 Dufferin Street
    Toronto, ON M3H 5T8 Canada
    Tel: (416) 667–7777 ext: 7849
    Fax: (416) 667–7881
    Email: journal.permissions@utpress.utoronto.ca