At the Ocean's Edge: A History of Nova Scotia to Confederation

By Margaret Conrad

© 2019

At the Ocean’s Edge offers a vibrant account of Nova Scotia’s colonial history, situating it in an early and dramatic chapter in the expansion of Europe. Between 1450 and 1850, various processes – sometimes violent, often judicial, rarely conclusive – transferred power first from Indigenous societies to the French and British empires, and then to European settlers and their descendants who claimed the land as their own.

This book not only brings Nova Scotia’s struggles into sharp focus but also unpacks the intellectual and social values that took root in the region. By the time that Nova Scotia became a province of the Dominion of Canada in 1867, its multicultural peoples, including Mi’kmaq, Acadian, African, and British, had come to a grudging, unequal, and often contested accommodation among themselves. Written in accessible and spirited prose, the narrative follows larger trends through the experiences of colourful individuals who grappled with expulsion, genocide, and war to establish the institutions, relationships, and values that still shape Nova Scotia’s identity.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 400 pages
  • Illustrations: 24
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP005676

  • AVAILABLE OCT 2019
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    ISBN 9781487523954
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    Regular Price: $75.00

    ISBN 9781487535483
  • AVAILABLE OCT 2019
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Quick Overview

Providing a rich cultural history of Nova Scotia, this book is rooted in a lifetime of research and a broad reading of secondary sources relating to issues of class, race, gender, and politics.

At the Ocean's Edge: A History of Nova Scotia to Confederation

By Margaret Conrad

© 2019

At the Ocean’s Edge offers a vibrant account of Nova Scotia’s colonial history, situating it in an early and dramatic chapter in the expansion of Europe. Between 1450 and 1850, various processes – sometimes violent, often judicial, rarely conclusive – transferred power first from Indigenous societies to the French and British empires, and then to European settlers and their descendants who claimed the land as their own.

This book not only brings Nova Scotia’s struggles into sharp focus but also unpacks the intellectual and social values that took root in the region. By the time that Nova Scotia became a province of the Dominion of Canada in 1867, its multicultural peoples, including Mi’kmaq, Acadian, African, and British, had come to a grudging, unequal, and often contested accommodation among themselves. Written in accessible and spirited prose, the narrative follows larger trends through the experiences of colourful individuals who grappled with expulsion, genocide, and war to establish the institutions, relationships, and values that still shape Nova Scotia’s identity.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 400 pages
  • Illustrations: 24
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Margaret Conrad is professor emerita in the History Department at University of New Brunswick.

  • Table of contents

    Introduction

    1. Ancient History
    2. Klu’skap’s Children
    3. Nova Scotia’s Sixteenth Century, 1497–1605
    4. Planting Acadie, 1605–1670
    5. Louis XIV’s Acadia, 1670–1713
    6. Contested Terrains, 1713–1749
    7. Reinventing Nova Scotia, 1749–1775
    8. The Great Divide, 1775–1792
    9. Entering the Long Nineteenth Century, 1792–1820
    10. Bluenoses and Britons, 1820–1854
    11. Making Progress, 1820–1864
    12. Confederation and its Discontents, 1864–1873

    Afterwards

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