Athens and Jerusalem: God, Humans, and Nature

By David Novak

© 2019

What is the relation of philosophy and theology? This question has been a matter of perennial concern in the history of Western thought. Written by one of the premier philosophers in the areas of Jewish ethics and interfaith issues between Judaism and Christianity, Athens and Jerusalem contends that philosophy and theology are not mutually exclusive.

Based on the Gifford Lectures David Novak delivered at the University of Aberdeen in 2017, this book explores the commonalities and common concerns that exist between philosophy and theology on metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical questions. Where are they different and where are they the same? And, how can they speak to one another?

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Product Details

  • Series: The Kenneth Michael Tanenbaum Series in Jewish Studies
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 448 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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  • AVAILABLE NOV 2019

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    ISBN 9781487524159
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  • AVAILABLE NOV 2019

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Quick Overview

This book argues that tensions between Jewish and Christian doctrine may be lessened if texts are regarded as philosophical frameworks of exploration as opposed to ethical commitments.

Athens and Jerusalem: God, Humans, and Nature

By David Novak

© 2019

What is the relation of philosophy and theology? This question has been a matter of perennial concern in the history of Western thought. Written by one of the premier philosophers in the areas of Jewish ethics and interfaith issues between Judaism and Christianity, Athens and Jerusalem contends that philosophy and theology are not mutually exclusive.

Based on the Gifford Lectures David Novak delivered at the University of Aberdeen in 2017, this book explores the commonalities and common concerns that exist between philosophy and theology on metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical questions. Where are they different and where are they the same? And, how can they speak to one another?

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: The Kenneth Michael Tanenbaum Series in Jewish Studies
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 448 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    David Novak is the J. Richard and Dorothy Shiff professor of Jewish Studies and Philosophy at the University of Toronto.
  • Table of contents

    Chapter I: Philosophy and Theology

    1. Athens and Jerusalem
    2. Misunderstanding the Relation of Philosophy and Theology
    3. Public Faith Commitments
    4. The Challenge of Philosophy
    5. Content and Method
    6. Faith and Reason
    7. Rejections of Revelation
    8. Philosophical Hermeneutics

    Chapter II: God, Humans, and Nature

    9. The Engagement of Philosophy and Theology
    10. The Relation of God and Humans
    11. God’s Mutability in Relation to Humans
    12. The Relation of God and Nature
    13. Nature and Its Miraculous Exceptions
    14. Miracles and Laws of Nature
    15. God’s Mutability in Relation to Nature

    Chapter III: Humans and Nature

    16. Humans Related to each Other and to God: Jerusalem
    17. Humans Related to Each Other
    18. Humans Related to Nature: Jerusalem
    19. Is and Ought
    20. Human Appreciation of God’s Creation
    21. Contemporary Environmentalism
    22. Tampering with Created Nature
    23. Humans Related to Nature: Athens

    Chapter IV: Philo and Plato

    24. The First Challenge of Philosophy to Theology
    25. The Relation of God and Nature
    26. Plato on God and Nature
    27. Philo on God and Nature
    28. The Relation of God and Humans
    29. Plato on Interhuman Relations
    30. Philo on Interhuman Relations
    31. Philo on the Relation of Humans and Nature

    Chapter V: Maimonides and Aristotle

    32. Maimonides’ Challenge
    33. Aristotle’s Teleology
    34. Aristotle: Ethics and Ontology
    35. Aristotle’s Ontology
    36. Maimonides on the Relation of God and Nature
    37. Maimonides’ Ontology
    38. Maimonides on the Relation of God and Humans
    39. Maimonides on Interhuman Relations
    40. Maimonides on the Relation of Humans and Nature

    Chapter VI: Kant’s Challenge to Theology

    41. The Last Challenge of Philosophy
    42. The Relation of Humans and Nature
    43. Noumena: Intellect and Will
    44. Autonomy in Interhuman Relations
    45. The Categorical Imperative: First Formulation
    46. The Categorical Imperative: Second Formulation
    47. The Categorical Imperative: Third Formulation
    48. Jewish Reactions to the First Formulation of the Categorical Imperative
    49. Jewish Reactions to the Second Formulation of the Categorical Imperative
    50. Jewish Reactions to the Third Formulation of the Categorical Imperative
    51. The Relation of God and Humans
    52. The Relation of God and Nature
    53. Jewish Reactions to Kant’s Notion of the Relation of God and Nature
    54. Conclusion

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