Becoming Biosubjects: Bodies. Systems. Technology.

By Neil Gerlach, Sheryl N. Hamilton, Rebecca Sullivan, and Priscilla L. Walton

© 2010

Becoming Biosubjects examines the ways in which the Canadian government, media, courts, and everyday Canadians are making sense of the challenges being posed by biotechnologies. The authors argue that the human body is now being understood as something that is fluid and without fixed meaning. This has significant implications both for how we understand ourselves and how we see our relationships with other forms of life.

Focusing on four major issues, the authors examine the ways in which genetic technologies are shaping criminal justice practices, how policies on reproductive technologies have shifted in response to biotechnologies, the debates surrounding the patenting of higher life forms, and the Canadian (and global) response to bioterrorism. Regulatory strategies in government and the courts are continually evolving and are affected by changing public perceptions of scientific knowledge. The legal and cultural shifts outlined in Becoming Biosubjects call into question what it means to be a Canadian, a citizen, and a human being.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 224 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.6in x 9.0in
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Quick Overview

Becoming Biosubjects examines the ways in which the Canadian government, media, courts, and everyday Canadians are making sense of the challenges being posed by biotechnologies.

Becoming Biosubjects: Bodies. Systems. Technology.

By Neil Gerlach, Sheryl N. Hamilton, Rebecca Sullivan, and Priscilla L. Walton

© 2010

Becoming Biosubjects examines the ways in which the Canadian government, media, courts, and everyday Canadians are making sense of the challenges being posed by biotechnologies. The authors argue that the human body is now being understood as something that is fluid and without fixed meaning. This has significant implications both for how we understand ourselves and how we see our relationships with other forms of life.

Focusing on four major issues, the authors examine the ways in which genetic technologies are shaping criminal justice practices, how policies on reproductive technologies have shifted in response to biotechnologies, the debates surrounding the patenting of higher life forms, and the Canadian (and global) response to bioterrorism. Regulatory strategies in government and the courts are continually evolving and are affected by changing public perceptions of scientific knowledge. The legal and cultural shifts outlined in Becoming Biosubjects call into question what it means to be a Canadian, a citizen, and a human being.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 224 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.6in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    Gertrude J. Robinson Award awarded by the Canadian Communication Association
    01
    CA

    'Becoming Biosubjects is an important book. A clearly written and fascinating read, it advances our understanding of how biotechnology, culture, and communication intersect and challenges its audience to reflect on the future that is happening around us.'
    Jennifer Daryl Slack, Department of Humanities, Michigan Technological University
  • Author Information

    Neil Gerlach is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Carleton University.



    Sheryl N. Hamilton is an associate professor in the Department of Law and the School of Journalism and Communication at Carleton University.



    Rebecca Sullivan is a professor in the Department of English at the University of Calgary.


    Priscilla L. Walton is a professor in the Department of English at Carleton University.

  • Table of contents

    Acknowledgements

    1. Introduction
    2. DNA Identification and Genetic Justice
    3. The Sexual Politics of Biotechnology
    4. Biopatents and the Ownership of Life
    5. Biosecurity, Bioterrorism, and Epidemic
    6. Conclusion: Becoming Biosubjects

    Notes
    References
    Index

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