Bernard Shaw and the BBC

Leonard Conolly

© 2009

George Bernard Shaw's frequently stormy but always creative relationship with the British Broadcasting Corporation was in large part responsible for making him a household name on both sides of the Atlantic. From the founding of the BBC in 1922 to his death in 1950, Shaw supported the BBC by participating in debates, giving talks, permitting radio and television broadcasts of many of his plays - even advising on pronunciation questions. Here, for the first time, Leonard Conolly illuminates the often grudging, though usually mutually beneficial, relationship between two of the twentieth century's cultural giants.

Drawing on extensive archival materials held in England, the United States, and Canada, Bernard Shaw and the BBC presents a vivid portrait of many contentious issues negotiated between Shaw and the public broadcaster. This is a fascinating study of how controversial works were first performed in both radio and television's infancies. It details debates about freedom of speech, the editing of plays for broadcast, and the protection of authors' rights to control and profit from works performed for radio and television broadcasts. Conolly also scrutinizes Second World War-era censorship, when the British government banned Shaw from making any broadcasts that questioned British policies or strategies.

Rich in detail and brimming with Shaw's irrepressible wit, this book also provides links to online appendices of Shaw's broadcasts for the BBC, texts of Shaw's major BBC talks, extracts from German wartime propaganda broadcasts about Shaw, and the BBC's obituaries for Shaw.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 256 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP002166

  • PUBLISHED FEB 2009

    From: $39.00

    Regular Price: $52.00

    ISBN 9780802089205
  • PUBLISHED FEB 2009

    From: $38.25

    Regular Price: $51.00

Quick Overview

Drawing on extensive archival materials held in England, the United States, and Canada, Bernard Shaw and the BBC presents a vivid portrait of many contentious issues negotiated between Shaw and the public broadcaster.

Bernard Shaw and the BBC

Leonard Conolly

© 2009

George Bernard Shaw's frequently stormy but always creative relationship with the British Broadcasting Corporation was in large part responsible for making him a household name on both sides of the Atlantic. From the founding of the BBC in 1922 to his death in 1950, Shaw supported the BBC by participating in debates, giving talks, permitting radio and television broadcasts of many of his plays - even advising on pronunciation questions. Here, for the first time, Leonard Conolly illuminates the often grudging, though usually mutually beneficial, relationship between two of the twentieth century's cultural giants.

Drawing on extensive archival materials held in England, the United States, and Canada, Bernard Shaw and the BBC presents a vivid portrait of many contentious issues negotiated between Shaw and the public broadcaster. This is a fascinating study of how controversial works were first performed in both radio and television's infancies. It details debates about freedom of speech, the editing of plays for broadcast, and the protection of authors' rights to control and profit from works performed for radio and television broadcasts. Conolly also scrutinizes Second World War-era censorship, when the British government banned Shaw from making any broadcasts that questioned British policies or strategies.

Rich in detail and brimming with Shaw's irrepressible wit, this book also provides links to online appendices of Shaw's broadcasts for the BBC, texts of Shaw's major BBC talks, extracts from German wartime propaganda broadcasts about Shaw, and the BBC's obituaries for Shaw.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 256 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    In Bernard Shaw and the BBC, Leonard Conolly tells a fascinating story from beginning to end. Conolly is a consummate editor with wonderful writing and attention to detail, and his thoroughly researched and documented account is unique in offering the points of view of both Shaw and the BBC. A superb study and a great pleasure to read.’

    Don B. Wilmeth, Asa Messer Professor Emeritus, Brown University

  • Author Information

    Leonard Conolly is a professor in the Department of English at Trent University and is general editor of the Selected Correspondence of Bernard Shaw.

  • Table of contents

    List of Illustrations
    Preface
    Acknowledgments
    A Chronology of Bernard Shaw and the BBC
    Abbreviations

    1. In the Beginning, 1923–1928
    2. Saint Joan, 1929
    3. ‘Saying Nice Things Is Not My Business’: Shaw Talks, 1929–1937
    4. 4 ‘Radiogenic Shaw’: Broadcast Plays, 1929–1939
    5. ‘GBS Has Been Very Kindly Disposed’: Pre-War Television
    6. ‘I Won’t Have That Man on the Air’: The War Years
    7. Television Returns, 1946–1950
    8. Radio Finale, 1945–1950
    9. Epilogue

    Appendix 1 Shaw’s Broadcast Plays and Talks, 1923–1950
    Appendix 2 Texts of Selected Shaw Broadcasts
    Appendix 3 German Wartime Propaganda Broadcasts about Shaw, 1940
    Appendix 4 BBC Obituaries of Shaw

    Notes
    Index

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