Beyond Political Correctness: Toward the inclusive university

Edited by Stephen Richer and Lorna Weir

© 1995

The term ‘political correctness’ has lately been transformed into a weapon of neo-conservatism. Once used to poke fun at social movements and civil-rights group for occasional lapses into rigidity, it has since become a popular handle for the neoconservative critique of higher education. Aimed at anti-racist and anti-sexist initiatives within universities, colleges, and other major social institutions, the term is used to discredit such innovations as employment equity, selective recruitment of students from groups that have suffered systemic discrimination, sexual harassment policies, and women’s studies programs, casting these as forms of tyranny that destroy academic freedom and merit.

This anthology is the first sociological analysis of political correctness and the first study of the phenomenon in Canada. Contributors argue on behalf of an inclusive university, showing that recent reforms not only work toward broadening human rights but provide a welcome reorganization of knowledge. All but two papers have been written specifically for this text.

Part One explores the history and social organization of the discourse, with the accent on Canadian material. The essays explore what the term has signified to different groups and to what ends they have used it. This section moves from an overview of political-correctness discourse to its explicit manifestation within universities in debates concerning academic ideals. Part Two looks at the classroom, a major site for building the inclusive university. Here, contributors explore feminist and anti-racist teaching and the limitations to such teaching imposed by the economic and political contexts of contemporary universities.

As these scholars trenchantly reveal, the political-correctness debate will ultimately affect the lives of everyone. This book offers insight into the values, ideals, and motives of both sides.

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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 288 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP005893

  • PUBLISHED MAY 1995

    From: $23.96

    Regular Price: $31.95

    ISBN 9780802077486
  • PUBLISHED DEC 1995

    From: $23.96

    Regular Price: $31.95

Quick Overview

As these scholars trenchantly reveal, the political-correctness debate will ultimately affect the lives of everyone. This book offers insight into the values, ideals, and motives of both sides.

Beyond Political Correctness: Toward the inclusive university

Edited by Stephen Richer and Lorna Weir

© 1995

The term ‘political correctness’ has lately been transformed into a weapon of neo-conservatism. Once used to poke fun at social movements and civil-rights group for occasional lapses into rigidity, it has since become a popular handle for the neoconservative critique of higher education. Aimed at anti-racist and anti-sexist initiatives within universities, colleges, and other major social institutions, the term is used to discredit such innovations as employment equity, selective recruitment of students from groups that have suffered systemic discrimination, sexual harassment policies, and women’s studies programs, casting these as forms of tyranny that destroy academic freedom and merit.

This anthology is the first sociological analysis of political correctness and the first study of the phenomenon in Canada. Contributors argue on behalf of an inclusive university, showing that recent reforms not only work toward broadening human rights but provide a welcome reorganization of knowledge. All but two papers have been written specifically for this text.

Part One explores the history and social organization of the discourse, with the accent on Canadian material. The essays explore what the term has signified to different groups and to what ends they have used it. This section moves from an overview of political-correctness discourse to its explicit manifestation within universities in debates concerning academic ideals. Part Two looks at the classroom, a major site for building the inclusive university. Here, contributors explore feminist and anti-racist teaching and the limitations to such teaching imposed by the economic and political contexts of contemporary universities.

As these scholars trenchantly reveal, the political-correctness debate will ultimately affect the lives of everyone. This book offers insight into the values, ideals, and motives of both sides.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 288 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Stephen Richer is a professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Carleton University.



    Lorna Weir is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology, York University.