University of Toronto Press Blog

  • The Journal of Comparative Family Studies joins the University of Toronto Press Journals

    JCFS joins UTP Journals

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

    University of Toronto Press is pleased to announce that the Journal of Comparative Family Studies has joined UTP’s Journals publishing program.

    The Journal of Comparative Family Studies (JCFS) was established in 1970 to publish high quality articles based on research in comparative and cross-cultural family studies. The journal promotes a better understanding of both intra- and inter-ethnic family interaction that is essential for all multicultural societies. It draws articles from social science researchers around the world and contains valuable material for Sociologists, Anthropologists, Family Counselors and Social Psychologists. JCFS publishes peer-reviewed articles, research notes, and book reviews four times per year.

    “The Journal of Comparative Family Studies continues the vision of founder Dr. George Kurian in providing high quality, comparative and cross cultural family research. We are excited to partner with the University of Toronto Press, a world class Canadian publisher, in order to expand and grow the availability and impact of JCFS. We look forward to being better able to serve our current and future subscribers with this new partnership.” – Todd Martin, Ph.D., CFLE, Managing Editor, JCFS

    “We are delighted to welcome Journal of Comparative Family Studies to the UTP Journals collection. JCFS is a vital resource in the field of family studies and will make a significant contribution to UTP’s long-standing tradition of scholarly publishing excellence. We look forward to working closely with JCFS authors and sharing this crucial research with current and future readers.” – Antonia Pop, Director, University of Toronto Press Journals.

    Early in 2019, the Journal of Comparative Family Studies’s complete archive of articles will be available online at https://www.utpjournals.press/jcfs.

    To sign up to receive important news relating to the Journal of Comparative Family Studies visit http://bit.ly/JCFSnews

     

    For more information, please contact:

    Vesna Micic
    Sales and Marketing Manager, Journals
    vmicic@utpress.utoronto.ca

  • “The view of the nation, Sire, is that the Constitution be respected:” Support for the French Constitution of 1791 on the Eve of the Republican Revolution

    Written by guest blogger, William S. Cormack.

    This article is part of a larger project on the French Legislative Assembly and the demise of the Constitution of 1791. I have always been interested in the French Revolution’s shift from its original moderate phase to its more radical phase. The period of the Legislative Assembly, from September 1791 to August 1792, has been relatively neglected by scholars. Yet these were months of great political significance, of high drama, of fear and uncertainty.

    One of the most dramatic episodes occurred on 20 June 1792 when crowds invaded the Tuileries palace in Paris. While Louis XVI made no concession to the popular militants, who demanded he sanction the Legislative Assembly’s decrees against émigrés and refractory priests, this journée is usually seen as step toward the insurrection of 10 August that overthrew the monarchy. The events of 20 June, however, provoked an outpouring of protest from across provincial France: departmental directories, district councils, municipalities, political clubs, and groups of ordinary citizens sent addresses and petitions to the Legislative Assembly denouncing the events in Paris. The address presented by a delegation from the Seine-et-Oise echoed the sentiments expressed in many other petitions: “We come in the name of the citizens of our department to foil the factious who dare to present to Your Majesty the shocking view of a few misled individuals as the view of the nation. The view of the nation, Sire, is that the Constitution be respected.”

    In examining this period, historians have emphasized the importance of the king’s attempted flight in June 1791 to undermining the early revolutionary consensus. Scholars have also explored the emergence of the popular movement in Paris, the rise of the Jacobin Club and its provincial network of popular societies, and the fateful consequences of France’s declaration of war against Austria in April 1792. All of these factors help to explain the fall of the constitutional monarchy on 10 August 1792, but their examination often reveals little about those who opposed the coming of a second revolution. My interest in that question was stimulated by Michael P. Fitzsimmons’ The remaking of France: The National Assembly and the Constitution of 1791, which argues that the importance of the constitution has too often been minimized or neglected. The same could be said for those who supported the Constitution of 1791 on the eve of its collapse. With regard to the provincial denunciations of the events of 20 June 1792 in Paris, historians have tended to characterize such protests as “royalist.”

    Yet reading these documents in the Archives Nationales, I found it striking that their statements of loyalty to Louis XVI are overshadowed by expressions of commitment to the principles of 1789. The petitions’ authors feared that the crowd’s intimidation of the king, incited or encouraged by the Jacobin Club, threatened the rule of law, individual liberty, the independence of the national legislature, and, above all, the survival of constitutional government. Thus provincial reactions to the journée of 20 June 1792 suggest evidence of a more subtle political division in France between radicals and defenders of the liberal revolution. The failed efforts to defend the Constitution of 1791 perhaps have relevance to our contemporary world where political moderation is out of fashion and rising populism threatens the ideal of written constitutions upholding individual rights and the rule of law.

    Photo of William S. Cormack

    William S. Cormack received his Ph.D. from Queen’s University at Kingston, Ontario, in 1992. In 1995 Cambridge University Press published his first book, Revolution and Political Conflict in the French Navy 1789-1794. Since 1998 he has been a member of the Department of History at the University of Guelph in Ontario, where he teaches modern European history. His new book, Patriots, Royalists, and Terrorists in the West Indies: The French Revolution in Martinique and Guadeloupe, 1789-1802, comes out with the University of Toronto Press in November 2018. His current research concerns the French Legislative Assembly and the demise of the Constitution of 1791. His article in the CJH/ACH is entitled “Defending the Liberal Revolution in France: Provincial Reactions to the Parisian journée of 20 June 1792,” and is available for FREE for a limited time at UTP Journals Online.

  • Presumed Heterosexuality in the Archives

    Written by guest blogger, Erin Gallagher-Cohoon.

    Between 1946 and 1948, US Public Health Service (USPHS) researchers deliberately exposed Guatemalan prisoners, soldiers, asylum patients, and sex workers to syphilis, gonorrhea, and chancroid. Leading up to this study, it was discovered that penicillin could cure syphilis and gonorrhea, and researchers were eager to learn whether penicillin had potential as a preventative and not just a cure. The original study design called for a sexual transmission method, although this was quickly supplanted by medical exposures. To put it more bluntly, the original study design called for hiring sex workers (who had either tested positive or were simply assumed to be infected with a venereal disease) to have sex with prisoners and soldiers and thus, it was hoped, to transmit venereal diseases from the women to the men. It was politically inadvisable in the United States for government researchers to be hiring sex workers. So they headed to a country with legalized prostitution, Guatemala.

    In 2015, in the midst of my research on the USPHS’ Sexually Transmitted Disease Inoculation Study, I came across a part of the history that made no sense to me.

    At this point in my studies, the records of the lead medical researcher, Dr. John C. Cutler, had been redacted and digitized (see https://www.archives.gov/research/health/cdc-cutler-records). So, I imagine I was squinting at my laptop in confusion.

    National Archives and Records Administration

    I was reading the patient index cards. Patient 147, a male asylum patient, “was a known, highly promiscuous and active homosexual.”[1] He was not the only male subject whose index card included a reference to same-sex sexual activities.

    These homosexual encounters were significant to me because they contradicted Dr. Cutler’s own words. In his “Final Syphilis Report,” he wrote: “homosexual contacts did not significantly alter experimental results.”[2]

    National Archives and Records Administration

    How, I wondered, could Dr. Cutler so readily dismiss the possibility that homosexual contacts might have been experimentally significant? On one hand, it seemed to me, he was dismissing the same-sex sexual activity of his male research subjects; while on the other, he was recording the existence of these “contacts,” and later archiving them for future researchers to find.

    The easy answer is that these encounters, based on his records, were statistically rare, and that “no clinical evidence of spread of syphilis by this route was observed.”[3] As I argue in my recent article in the Canadian Bulletin of Medical History, however, this does not sufficiently explain the contradictions within the records. Rather, as the original study design shows, the study was based on a flawed understanding of disease transmission that assumed the presence of an infected female body, an assumption that was fundamentally heteronormative. Within this context, homosexual behaviour was implausible or, at best, irrelevant.

    [1] Patient 147, Index Cards, Insane Asylum Female Patients Con't, Hollinger Box 1a, CDC Record Group 442, Records of Dr. John C. Cutler, National Archives and Records Administration at Atlanta. Although grouped with the index cards of 'Insane Asylum Female Patients Con't,' this patient was in fact male. On 19 September 1947, it was noted that "Penis-papule at right of frenum, 3x5 mm. The frenum and foreskin surrounding papule are indurated."

    [2] Records of Dr. John C. Cutler, Final Syphilis Report, Folder 1, 29.

    [3] Records of Dr. John C. Cutler, Final Syphilis Report, Folder 1, 27.


    Erin Gallagher-Cohoon (Department of History, Queen's University) recently published “Despite Being ‘Known, Highly Promiscuous and Active’: Presumed Heterosexuality in the USPHS’s STD Inoculation Study, 1946–48” in the Fall 2018 issue of Canadian Bulletin of Medical History. The article is free to read for a limited time here.

  • Metadata from <front> to </back>: Publishing Metadata with UTP Journals

    XML Code over Journal Covers

    Last week, we attended Crossref LIVE18 with this year's theme being How good is your metadata? In preparation for the conference, we put together a poster outlining our metadata workflow and how we plan to continually adapt in the ever-changing world of scholarly metadata. Download the poster here (PDF) or continue reading to learn more about how we work with metadata.

    UTP Journals Metadata Workflow

    At UTP Journals, our mission is to publish exemplary works of scholarship and to disseminate knowledge widely for the benefit of society. Metadata is the key to this mission in a digital world. Our metadata workflow starts from manuscript submission and flows through the editorial and production process, building and improving until publication and beyond.

    1. Manuscript Submission

    Authors create their own article metadata in an individual journal’s submission system by completing form fields as part of the submission process. With the power of Clarivate’s ScholarOne Manuscripts™ and a robust XML export process, this metadata is retained throughout editing and production processes.

    Submission metadata includes:

    • Article Title
    • Abstract(s)—some journals publish English and/or French abstracts, as well as lay summaries
    • Keywords—also often available in English and French
    • Contributor information—details about the corresponding author, given name(s), surname(s), institutional affiliation(s), email(s), and ORCIDs (automatically verified)
    • Funders—if applicable
    • Date received—automatic
    • Date revised—automatic, if applicable

    2. Editorial Process

    Editors also contribute article metadata at various stages between manuscript submission and production.

    As part of ScholarOne’s editorial and peer review workflow, editors can accept articles and assign them to specific volumes and issues for a journal, as well as assign or automatically generate a DOI before the article even reaches production.

    Metadata added at this stage includes:

    • Date accepted
    • Volume and issue assignment
    • Issue title
    • TOC subject title
    • DOI

    3. Typesetting and File Prep

    Files are prepped, processed, and tagged before and after copy editing to ensure the manuscript, and particularly the references, are tagged meaningfully prior to publication. We use JATS XML to store journal metadata alongside manuscripts.

    Early in production, individual articles may be published as Advance Online (AO) articles and receive a “preprint” date in the XML. AO DOIs are registered and retained in final publication when they’re updated with the full set of metadata.

    DOIs are automatically added to references when reference data matches Crossref records, so authors don’t necessarily need to hunt down article DOIs in order to improve reference linking.

    Metadata is completed prior to publication, including:

    • Advance Online date
    • EPUB date
    • PPUB date
    • License data including license type and copyright URL
    • References
    • Full-text URL

    4. Publication and Indexing

    Articles published on our UTP Journals Online platform are automatically deposited to Crossref for DOI registration. Our full-text JATS XML files are converted to readable Crossref metadata.

    Advance Online articles and version of record articles share one DOI and one URL. Our platform also allows us to enable multiple resolution URLs for journals simultaneously hosted by our partners, including Project MUSE, EBSCO, and JSTOR. This ensures that users have additional possible avenues of access.

    We have dedicated team members monitoring DOIs for errors and conflicts to ensure the metadata we deposit is high quality and accessible, as well as to make improvements to our metadata deposits as they become available..

    With over 20 complete online archives, all digitized content has been registered with Crossref with unique DOIs and metadata.

    All of UTP’s content is registered with our 10.3138 DOI prefix, and each article begins with a 3-to-8-letter code (usually an acronym) matching the DOI of the journal it’s been published in.

    The Future of UTP Metadata

    How good is our metadata? Only as good as we continuously strive to make it.

    Participation Reports: At UTP, we are now exploring Crossref’s beta Participation Reports tool to see where we can improve our metadata in the future. It all ties into the interest we have in what metadata matters when it comes to UTP’s particular journal content.

    Upcoming Automatic Deposit Support: UTP Journals Online, powered by Atypon® Literatum, is actively improving in its index depositing capabilities to ensure the metadata we retain is deposited wherever possible. One of the features we anticipate is automatic authentication for the ORCIDs that authors provide. Support for abstract deposits are expected in an upcoming release, and we eagerly anticipate future upgrades.

    Investing in Metadata: We have exciting plans to improve our metadata workflow, further enrich the metadata we publish, and invest the necessary time and resources to accomplish our goal of publishing quality metadata across all journals.

    Author Resources

    We want authors to understand the importance of the metadata they provide, as well as how it is used. Our online and print author resources explain:

    • Why is it important to write a meaningful title, abstract, and keywords?
    • Why link to the version of record?
    • What is a digital object identifier (DOI)?
    • How do ORCIDs improve article metadata and discoverability?

    Learn More

    Keep checking Crossref LIVE18 for recorded sessions of this year's conference and see our author resources if you'd like to learn more about publishing with UTP Journals.

  • The Heritage Book Project: Selected Science Books

    In this final contribution to the University Press Week Blog Tour (November 12-17), Harriet Kim provides a selection of interesting science books that she recently brought back into print as part of UTP's Heritage Book Project. For today's theme of #TurnItUP: Science, Harriet provides some fascinating picks from our backlist.

    By Harriet Kim

    University of Toronto Press carries a rich history in the breadth and depth of scholarly, reference, and general interest books published since our founding in 1901. Expanding on our tradition of advancing knowledge, the Heritage Book Project aims to increase access to our books by bringing out-of-print titles back into circulation as ebooks and as print-on-demand paperbacks. Titles date from 1928 to 2011 and range in categories from health sciences and medicine to philosophy, anthropology, politics, mathematics, and literature. We are making these important heritage resources available for a new generation of readers and learners to discover and to continue outreach to academic communities in their engagement of critical and innovative scholarship.

    When I think of a new generation of readers and learners, I think of many of my friends, colleagues, and peers who are pursuing a variety of career paths and could possibly benefit from having these resources. I think of, for example, those pursuing careers in science – as science educators, climate change researchers, and epidemiologists – and the heritage titles that cater to their work.

    I also think of the readers and learners who could benefit from this series in a less traditional or obvious way. Working on this series and having firsthand access to these resources has been a learning process for me, too. I think about a younger version of myself with her love of science and her many dreams of becoming everything from astronomer to zoologist. As someone who pursued a different path from the sciences, this has been a unique way for me to be doing what I am doing in publishing but also continue chasing my curiosity of the sciences.

    Here is a roundup of some science titles from Heritage Book Project that piqued my curiosity:

    Forest Regeneration in Ontario: Based on a Review of Surveys Conducted in the Province during the Period 1918-1951 (1953) by R.C. Hosie, "presents a general view of the nature of tree reproduction on cut-over forest land, an analysis of the procedure in conducting and reporting regeneration surveys, and conclusions and recommendations for the conducting of future surveys.”

    The Snakes of Ontario (1957), by E.B.S Logier, gives an account of "the natural history of snakes, or how to identify those found in Ontario.”

    Bacteriology Primer in Air Contamination Control (1967) by V. Victor Kingsley, provides a basic overview of the “problems in bacteriology which would help in the understanding, handling, and moving of 'clean' (uncontaminated) air to and from critical areas.”

    The Life Puzzle: On Crystals and Organisms and on the Possibility of a Crystal as an Ancestor (1971), by A.G. Cairns-Smith, advances the author’s theories on the origin of life, with considerations of molecular biology and chemistry.

    The Natural Alien: Humankind and Environment (1993) by Neil Evernden, “evaluates the international environmental movement and the underlying assumptions that could doom it to failure.”

    Wild Things: Nature, Culture, and Tourism in Ontario, 1790-1914 (1995), by Patricia Jasen, “shows how the region now known as Ontario held special appeal for tourists seeking to indulge a passion for wild country or act out their fantasies of primitive life.”

    The Discovery of Insulin: The Twenty-fifth Anniversary Edition (2000), by Michael Bliss, recounts the fascinating story behind the discovery of insulin at the University of Toronto in 1921-22: "a story as much filled with fiery confrontation and intense competition as medical dedication and scientific genius.”

    The Sleep of Others and the Transformation of Sleep Research (2007), by Kenton Kroker, is the “first ever history of sleep research, drawing on a wide range of material to present the story of how an investigative field – at one time dominated by the study of dreams – slowly morphed into a laboratory-based discipline.”

    The magnitude of such a project is not lost on me – from the figurative weight of UTP’s history represented in this series to the literal weight of all the books that are sent for scanning! Since 2014, we have brought nearly 1,000 titles back into circulation and over 1,600 titles will end up in the Heritage Project. It has been and continues to be a tremendous effort supported by continuously improving scanning and printing technology and more importantly, many people at University of Toronto Press, University of Toronto libraries, and the Toronto Reference Library.

    Whether you are reading any of these titles out of interest (and maybe even indulging your nostalgia of a childhood dream) or as a way to support your research and work, I hope they will be invaluable learning resources for you, too.

    To continue on the final day of the University Press Week Blog Tour, check out posts by these other fine university presses:

    Johns Hopkins University Press
    Blog: https://www.press.jhu.edu/news/blog
    Twitter: @JHUPress

    Princeton University Press
    Blog: http://blog.press.princeton.edu/
    Twitter: @PrincetonUPress

    Rutgers University Press
    Blog: https://www.rutgersuniversitypress.org/category/news/
    Twitter: @RutgersUPress

    University of Colorado Press
    Blog: https://upcolorado.com/about-us/blog
    Twitter: @UPColorado

    Columbia University Press
    Blog: cupblog.org
    Twitter: @ColumbiaUP

    University of Georgia Press
    Blog: www.ugapress.wordpress.com
    Twitter: @UGAPress

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