Events & Conferences

  • UTP Goes to Congress: Enter Our Twitter Contest!

    Our team is on its way to the beautiful University of British Columbia for Congress! Heading to BC? Plan to drop by the UTP display to meet with editors, grab some swag, and enter our contests – and, of course, add a book or two to your reading list.

    First up: we’ll be kicking off the week with a Twitter contest. It’s easy: during Congress, follow us @utpress and send out a tweet using the hashtag #UTPGoesToCongress. You’ll be entered to win a prize pack of our top titles in higher ed. Hanging out at Congress and aren’t on Twitter? Stop by the UTP booth and sign up for our newsletter for another chance to win. Never miss an update and you may have some great reads heading your way...

    Learn more about our higher ed prize pack:

    Work Your Career: Get What You Want from Your Social Sciences or Humanities PhD

    How do you choose between a non-academic and an academic career? Prepare for both from your first day on campus! Authors Jonathan Malloy and Loleen Berdahl show how your PhD can take you down any number of paths. Filled with practical, no-nonsense advice tailored to you, you'll want this handy guide beside you every step of the way.


    The Craft of University Teaching

    How does university instruction look when it’s approached as a craft? In an era of bureaucratic oversight, diminishing budgets, and technological distraction, Peter Lindsay seeks to reclaim teaching as the rewarding endeavor it is.

     


    The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy

    A must-read for anyone in academia concerned about the frantic pace of contemporary university life. Focusing on individual faculty members and their own professional practice, Maggie Berg and Barbara Seeber present both an analysis of the culture of speed in the academy and ways of alleviating stress while improving teaching, research, and collegiality.


    Course Correction: A Map for the Distracted University

    The university’s business, Paul Gooch writes, is to generate and critique knowledge claims, and to transmit and certify the acquisition of knowledge. Course Correction engages in deliberation about what the twenty-first-century university needs to do in order to re-find its focus as a protected place for unfettered commitment to knowledge, not just as a space for creating employment or economic prosperity.


    Kickstarting Your Academic Career: Skills to Succeed in the Social Sciences

    An essential primer on the common scholastic demands that social sciences students face upon entering college or university. Based on the challenges that instructors most often find students need help with, Robert Ostergard Jr. and Stacy Fisher offer practical advice and tips on topics such as how to communicate with instructors, take notes, read a textbook, research and write papers, and write successful exams.

     


    Contest Rules and Regulations – University of Toronto Press
    Open to residents of Canada (excluding the Province of Quebec)

    1. CONTEST PERIOD: The 2019 University of Toronto Press Twitter contest commences at 12:00 AM Eastern Time (“ET”) on June 1, 2019, and will end at June 8, 2019 (the “Contest Period”). All times are Eastern Times.

    2. RULES: By entering this Contest, entrants agree to abide by these Contest rules and regulations (the “Official Rules”). The decisions of the independent contest organization with respect to all aspects of the Contest are final. These rules are posted at http://blog.utorontopress.com/2019/05/30/utp-congress-twitter-contest

    3. ELIGIBILITY: To enter the win the Contest and be eligible to win a Prize (see rule 6), a person (“Entrant”) must, at the time of entry, be a legal resident of Canada (excluding the Province of Quebec) who has reached the age of majority in his/her province or territory of residence. The following individuals and members of such person’s immediate family (including mother, father, brothers, sisters, sons, daughters, partner or spouse regardless of where they live) or persons with whom they are domiciled (whether related to the person or not) are not eligible to enter the Contest: employees, officers, directors, shareholders, owners, general and limited partners, agents, representatives, successors.

    4. HOW TO ENTER: During the Contest period, follow @utpress on Twitter, and tweet using the hashtag #UTPGoesToCongress that pertains to the Contest. Limit one (1) entry per person per day during the contest Period regardless of method of entry. Any person who is found to have entered in a fashion not sanctioned by these Official Rules will be disqualified.

    5. PRIZE: The winner will receive one (1) print copy of each of the following: Course Correction, The Slow Professor, Work Your Career, Kickstarting Your Academic Career, and The Craft of University Teaching.

    6. DRAW:

    i. The random draw will include all eligible entries, and will take place on June 9, 2019 at 12:00 PM at the University of Toronto Press offices, located at 800 Bay St. Mezzanine, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3A9.

    ii. The winner will be contacted via social media, and will be included in the announcement on Twitter. If a selected Entrant cannot be reached via social media within 7 days of the draw, then he/she will be disqualified and another Entrant will be randomly selected until such time as contact is made via social media with a selected Entrant that satisfies the foregoing requirements or there are no more eligible entries, whichever comes first. University of Toronto Press will not be responsible for failed attempts to contact a selected Entrant.

    7. CONDITIONS OF ENTRY: By entering the Contest, Entrants (i) confirm compliance with these Official Rules including all eligibility requirements, and (ii) agree to be bound by these Official Rules and by the decisions of University of Toronto Press, made in its sole discretion, which shall be final and binding in all matters relating to this Contest. Entrants who have not complied with these Official Rules are subject to disqualification.

    8. CONSENT TO USE PERSONAL INFORMATION: University of Toronto Press respects your right to privacy. The information you provided will only be used for the purpose of administering this Contest and prize fulfillment. For more information regarding University of Toronto Press’s privacy statement, please visit https://utorontopress.com/ca/privacy-policy.

  • UTP Goes to Congress 2019

    With summer fast approaching, that can only mean one thing here at UTP. Yes, we're packing our bags and heading to Congress 2019 in gorgeous Vancouver, BC. We will be mounting our largest ever display of books in Vancouver, and we'll be teaming up with our Journals and Distribution divisions to showcase an even wider range of publications.

    Whether you are attending your association’s conference or are a member of the Vancouver community, we would love to see you. Don’t miss this opportunity to develop your social network, or maybe add some fabulous UTP books to your home or office library. You can find us at the Congress Expo, located in the Congress Hub. You can also follow us on Twitter throughout the conference for regular updates.

    In this blog post, we've listed a number of key events throughout the week of Congress that you should mark in your calendars. We hope to see you in Vancouver!


    Key Events at Congress

    Sunday, June 2, 2019: 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM (AMS Nest - NEST 2301 Expo Event Space)

    Book Launch: Amplify

    Join us for the book launch of Amplify, where author Norah Bowman will discuss this latest addition in graphic storytelling.

    In this highly original text – a collaboration between a college professor, a playwright, and an artist – graphic storytelling offers a unique way for readers to understand and engage with feminism and resistance in a more emotionally resonant way.


    Sunday, June 2, 2019: 12:00 PM-1:00 PM (Laserre 102)

    CAS Book Celebration

    Come and learn about the books that have been published in 2018-19 and meet their authors. Some copies will be available for purchase and/or author signing. Natalie Kononenko will be in attendance to launch her new book Ukrainian Epic and Historical Song, and Erica L. Fraser will be there to celebrate her book Military Masculinity and Postwar Recovery in the Soviet Union.


    Monday, June 3, 2019: 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM (Ideas Lounge and Patio)

    Reception of the Canadian Committee on Women’s History

    Featuring Reading Canadian Women’s and Gender Historyedited by Nancy Janovicek and Carmen Nielson.

    Inspired by the question of "what’s next?" in the field of Canadian women’s and gender history, this broadly historiographical volume represents a conversation among established and emerging scholars who share a commitment to understanding the past from intersectional feminist perspectives.


    Monday, June 3, 2019: 6:00 PM - 8:25 PM (Wise Hall, 1882 Adanac Street, Vancouver, BC, V5L 2E2)

    Marvellous Grounds: Queering Urban Justice

    A discussion with the editors of the Marvellous Grounds Collective on queering urban justice and challenging racialized state formations and geographies.

    Speakers:
    • Ghaida Moussa, PHD Student York University, PhD Student York University
    • Jin Haritaworn, Professor, York University, Professor, York University
    • Syrus Marcus Ware, PhD Student York University

    Tuesday, June 4, 2019: 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

    Book Launch for A Violent History of Benevolence

    Following on from the Queer Caucus meeting at noon, The Canadian Association for Social Work Education will be hosting the launch for A Violent History of Benevolence by Chris Chapman and A.J. Withers.

    The book traces how normative histories of liberalism, progress, and social work enact and obscure systemic violences.


    Tuesday, June 4, 2019: 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM (Dorothy Somerset Studio - Room 101)

    Coffee Break and Book Launch: Insecurity

    The Canadian Association for Theatre Research will be hosting a book launch for Dr. Jenn Stephenson's new book Insecurity: Perils and Products of Theatres of the Real.

    "This book offers a compelling and timely investigation of the ‘real’, ably and amply illustrated by a diversity of case studies. A must-read addition to scholarship on Canadian theatre and performance."

    Susan Bennett, Department of English, University of Calgary


    Wednesday, June 5, 2019: 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM (Buchanan Tower 1197)

    Book Launch for Violence, Order, and Unrest

    The Canadian Historical Association will be hosting a book launch for Violence, Order, and Unrest edited by Elizabeth Mancke, Jerry Bannister, Denis McKim, and Scott W. See.

    This edited collection offers a broad reinterpretation of the origins of Canada. Drawing on cutting-edge research in a number of fields, Violence, Order, and Unrest explores the development of British North America from the mid-eighteenth century through the aftermath of Confederation.


    Wednesday, June 5, 2019: 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM (AMS Nest - NEST 2301 Expo Event Space)

    Peter Lindsay on The Craft of University Teaching

    What does university teaching – as a craft – look like? What changes does a craft perspective suggest for higher education? These questions will be addressed in both a general sense – What does the act of teaching become when treated as a craft? What changes to a professor’s educational philosophy does it require? – and with respect to the practical, everyday tasks of university professors, such as the use and misuse of technology, the handling of academic dishonesty, the assignment of course reading, and the instilling of enthusiasm for learning. Join author Peter Lindsay as he addresses these questions, outlined in his book, The Craft of University Teaching.


    Thursday, June 6, 2019: 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM (AMS Nest - NEST 2306)

    Work Your Career: How to Strategically Position Yourself for Career Success

    How can prospective and recent PhD students best position themselves for rewarding careers? Do you have to choose between preparing for an academic or non-academic career path? Drawing on research and their personal career histories in the nonprofit, government and academic sectors, the speakers will outline tools to: identify current career competencies and networks; create an action plan to increase competitiveness for both academic and non-academic careers simultaneously; and articulate competencies to potential employers. Current and recent PhD students, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate supervisors and chairs in the social sciences and humanities should plan to attend.

    Speakers:
    • Loleen Berdahl, Professor and Head, Department of Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan
    • Jonathan Malloy, Professor, Department of Political Science, Carleton University

    Thursday, June 6, 2019: 6:00 Pm - 8:00 PM (Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre - IRSHDC Main Room)

    Genocide, Residential Schools, and the Challenge of [Re]Conciliation: Dialogue and Panel Discussion

    Join in a panel discussion and dialogue with Professor David MacDonald (Guelph University) and Dr. Sheryl Lightfoot (University of British Columbia). as they discuss MacDonald’s new book, The Sleeping Giant Awakes: Genocide, Indian Residential Schools and the Challenge of Conciliation.

    Speakers:
    • David MacDonald, Guelph University
    • Dr. Sheryl Lightfoot, UBC

  • The Right Side of History: The Political Urgency Needed in Addressing Climate Change

    Global Ecopolitics: Crisis, Governance, and Justice, Second Edition, written by Peter Stoett with Shane Mulligan, is a comprehensive and accessibly written introduction to the policymakers and the structuring bodies involved in creating global environmental policies. The book provides a panoramic view of the issues, agents, and structures that make up the fabric of global environmental governance.

    In this post, author Peter Stoett writes about his time spent at the Planetary Security Conference in the Netherlands at the beginning of the year and why these conferences reflect the political urgency currently attached to climate change.


    Back in February, I attended the 4th Hague Planetary Security Conference in the Netherlands, where over 350 international experts, practitioners, military and government representatives gathered to discuss the threats posed to the world by climate change and other threats to planetary ecology. Mixing all these people together would have been unthinkable a mere three decades ago; now it is commonly accepted that the only way we can promote resilience and adaptation to climate change is by inter-sectoral collaboration that includes some unlikely alliances.

    Representatives from the Lake Chad region, the Horn of Africa, and the Middle East all say the same thing: climate change is not only real and happening, but is exacerbating the threat of violence in these regions where mass migration and displacement, and civil conflict are already in strong motion. Water, in particular, comes up again and again as the resource scarcity issue of our time.

    In Global Ecopolitics: Crisis, Governance, and Justice, Second Edition, I discuss water scarcity as not only a source of conflict, but of collaborative opportunity – most transborder water disputes have been dealt with diplomatically and many in fact have led to institutional developments. But there are clear indications that climate change-induced water scarcity is heightening extant tensions and it is fairly widely accepted that the horrible civil war in Syria was to some extent prompted by a severe drought that led to political instability. One theme that has emerged is that, despite the Security Council having dealt specifically with climate security, the UN needs to step up further and establish an early-warning system for climate-related conflict, so that we can see it coming and strive to take preventive measures.

    Effects of Hurricane Irma

    I was in the Netherlands to speak at an event focused on the question of moving to a post-carbon based energy infrastructure in the Caribbean region. The threats posed by climate change in the Caribbean are existential: this is life or death stuff. Extreme weather events, rising sea levels, coral reef bleaching, fisheries affected by temperature changes, freshwater scarcity; the list goes on for the Small Island Developing States (SIDS). I cover SIDS at various points in the text, as well as the gradual (some would say painfully slow) transition toward renewable energy production and consumption. Clearly, it is the way forward.

    But the transition will not be painless, and as always it may leave some people behind. While we often think of the Caribbean region as a tourist destination or a hurricane zone, the reality is that most of the population and predominant industries are located near its beautiful coasts. In many ways Caribbean citizens are on the front-line of climate change threats, much like the Inuit in northern Canada and other circumpolar communities. These communities can benefit enormously from the adoption of renewable power sources that lessen dependence on the global oil economy, providing the technological capacity and public policy is conducive.

    The shift to renewable energy will certainly affect the geopolitical structure of global ecopolitics. China is emerging as a renewable energy superpower, and will have increasing influence in areas such as the Caribbean beyond its usual economic presence. Human security is again rising as a viable concept to deal with the ravages that natural disasters inflict on civilian populations. Responsible tourism has become a genuine national security issue in the region since long-term economic development is so dependent on this sector.

    We cannot base a global security strategy on constant disaster relief. Back in water-soaked Holland, there are famous stories about the futility of trying to stop floods with stopgap measures. One of the overarching questions of our time is how relatively impoverished and highly vulnerable regions can be integrated into global strategies. Conferences like this reflect the political urgency currently attached to the climate change-security nexus, despite its denial by a few powerful actors who are, as the saying goes, on the wrong side of history.


    If you want to find out more about Global Ecopolitics: Crisis, Governance, and Justice, Second Edition, click here to view the table of contents and read an exclusive excerpt from the book.


    Peter J. Stoett is Dean of the Faculty of Social Science and Humanities at the University of Ontario Institute Of Technology.

  • Metadata from <front> to </back>: Publishing Metadata with UTP Journals

    XML Code over Journal Covers

    Last week, we attended Crossref LIVE18 with this year's theme being How good is your metadata? In preparation for the conference, we put together a poster outlining our metadata workflow and how we plan to continually adapt in the ever-changing world of scholarly metadata. Download the poster here (PDF) or continue reading to learn more about how we work with metadata.

    UTP Journals Metadata Workflow

    At UTP Journals, our mission is to publish exemplary works of scholarship and to disseminate knowledge widely for the benefit of society. Metadata is the key to this mission in a digital world. Our metadata workflow starts from manuscript submission and flows through the editorial and production process, building and improving until publication and beyond.

    1. Manuscript Submission

    Authors create their own article metadata in an individual journal’s submission system by completing form fields as part of the submission process. With the power of Clarivate’s ScholarOne Manuscripts™ and a robust XML export process, this metadata is retained throughout editing and production processes.

    Submission metadata includes:

    • Article Title
    • Abstract(s)—some journals publish English and/or French abstracts, as well as lay summaries
    • Keywords—also often available in English and French
    • Contributor information—details about the corresponding author, given name(s), surname(s), institutional affiliation(s), email(s), and ORCIDs (automatically verified)
    • Funders—if applicable
    • Date received—automatic
    • Date revised—automatic, if applicable

    2. Editorial Process

    Editors also contribute article metadata at various stages between manuscript submission and production.

    As part of ScholarOne’s editorial and peer review workflow, editors can accept articles and assign them to specific volumes and issues for a journal, as well as assign or automatically generate a DOI before the article even reaches production.

    Metadata added at this stage includes:

    • Date accepted
    • Volume and issue assignment
    • Issue title
    • TOC subject title
    • DOI

    3. Typesetting and File Prep

    Files are prepped, processed, and tagged before and after copy editing to ensure the manuscript, and particularly the references, are tagged meaningfully prior to publication. We use JATS XML to store journal metadata alongside manuscripts.

    Early in production, individual articles may be published as Advance Online (AO) articles and receive a “preprint” date in the XML. AO DOIs are registered and retained in final publication when they’re updated with the full set of metadata.

    DOIs are automatically added to references when reference data matches Crossref records, so authors don’t necessarily need to hunt down article DOIs in order to improve reference linking.

    Metadata is completed prior to publication, including:

    • Advance Online date
    • EPUB date
    • PPUB date
    • License data including license type and copyright URL
    • References
    • Full-text URL

    4. Publication and Indexing

    Articles published on our UTP Journals Online platform are automatically deposited to Crossref for DOI registration. Our full-text JATS XML files are converted to readable Crossref metadata.

    Advance Online articles and version of record articles share one DOI and one URL. Our platform also allows us to enable multiple resolution URLs for journals simultaneously hosted by our partners, including Project MUSE, EBSCO, and JSTOR. This ensures that users have additional possible avenues of access.

    We have dedicated team members monitoring DOIs for errors and conflicts to ensure the metadata we deposit is high quality and accessible, as well as to make improvements to our metadata deposits as they become available..

    With over 20 complete online archives, all digitized content has been registered with Crossref with unique DOIs and metadata.

    All of UTP’s content is registered with our 10.3138 DOI prefix, and each article begins with a 3-to-8-letter code (usually an acronym) matching the DOI of the journal it’s been published in.

    The Future of UTP Metadata

    How good is our metadata? Only as good as we continuously strive to make it.

    Participation Reports: At UTP, we are now exploring Crossref’s beta Participation Reports tool to see where we can improve our metadata in the future. It all ties into the interest we have in what metadata matters when it comes to UTP’s particular journal content.

    Upcoming Automatic Deposit Support: UTP Journals Online, powered by Atypon® Literatum, is actively improving in its index depositing capabilities to ensure the metadata we retain is deposited wherever possible. One of the features we anticipate is automatic authentication for the ORCIDs that authors provide. Support for abstract deposits are expected in an upcoming release, and we eagerly anticipate future upgrades.

    Investing in Metadata: We have exciting plans to improve our metadata workflow, further enrich the metadata we publish, and invest the necessary time and resources to accomplish our goal of publishing quality metadata across all journals.

    Author Resources

    We want authors to understand the importance of the metadata they provide, as well as how it is used. Our online and print author resources explain:

    • Why is it important to write a meaningful title, abstract, and keywords?
    • Why link to the version of record?
    • What is a digital object identifier (DOI)?
    • How do ORCIDs improve article metadata and discoverability?

    Learn More

    Keep checking Crossref LIVE18 for recorded sessions of this year's conference and see our author resources if you'd like to learn more about publishing with UTP Journals.

  • The Heritage Book Project: Selected Science Books

    In this final contribution to the University Press Week Blog Tour (November 12-17), Harriet Kim provides a selection of interesting science books that she recently brought back into print as part of UTP's Heritage Book Project. For today's theme of #TurnItUP: Science, Harriet provides some fascinating picks from our backlist.

    By Harriet Kim

    University of Toronto Press carries a rich history in the breadth and depth of scholarly, reference, and general interest books published since our founding in 1901. Expanding on our tradition of advancing knowledge, the Heritage Book Project aims to increase access to our books by bringing out-of-print titles back into circulation as ebooks and as print-on-demand paperbacks. Titles date from 1928 to 2011 and range in categories from health sciences and medicine to philosophy, anthropology, politics, mathematics, and literature. We are making these important heritage resources available for a new generation of readers and learners to discover and to continue outreach to academic communities in their engagement of critical and innovative scholarship.

    When I think of a new generation of readers and learners, I think of many of my friends, colleagues, and peers who are pursuing a variety of career paths and could possibly benefit from having these resources. I think of, for example, those pursuing careers in science – as science educators, climate change researchers, and epidemiologists – and the heritage titles that cater to their work.

    I also think of the readers and learners who could benefit from this series in a less traditional or obvious way. Working on this series and having firsthand access to these resources has been a learning process for me, too. I think about a younger version of myself with her love of science and her many dreams of becoming everything from astronomer to zoologist. As someone who pursued a different path from the sciences, this has been a unique way for me to be doing what I am doing in publishing but also continue chasing my curiosity of the sciences.

    Here is a roundup of some science titles from Heritage Book Project that piqued my curiosity:

    Forest Regeneration in Ontario: Based on a Review of Surveys Conducted in the Province during the Period 1918-1951 (1953) by R.C. Hosie, "presents a general view of the nature of tree reproduction on cut-over forest land, an analysis of the procedure in conducting and reporting regeneration surveys, and conclusions and recommendations for the conducting of future surveys.”

    The Snakes of Ontario (1957), by E.B.S Logier, gives an account of "the natural history of snakes, or how to identify those found in Ontario.”

    Bacteriology Primer in Air Contamination Control (1967) by V. Victor Kingsley, provides a basic overview of the “problems in bacteriology which would help in the understanding, handling, and moving of 'clean' (uncontaminated) air to and from critical areas.”

    The Life Puzzle: On Crystals and Organisms and on the Possibility of a Crystal as an Ancestor (1971), by A.G. Cairns-Smith, advances the author’s theories on the origin of life, with considerations of molecular biology and chemistry.

    The Natural Alien: Humankind and Environment (1993) by Neil Evernden, “evaluates the international environmental movement and the underlying assumptions that could doom it to failure.”

    Wild Things: Nature, Culture, and Tourism in Ontario, 1790-1914 (1995), by Patricia Jasen, “shows how the region now known as Ontario held special appeal for tourists seeking to indulge a passion for wild country or act out their fantasies of primitive life.”

    The Discovery of Insulin: The Twenty-fifth Anniversary Edition (2000), by Michael Bliss, recounts the fascinating story behind the discovery of insulin at the University of Toronto in 1921-22: "a story as much filled with fiery confrontation and intense competition as medical dedication and scientific genius.”

    The Sleep of Others and the Transformation of Sleep Research (2007), by Kenton Kroker, is the “first ever history of sleep research, drawing on a wide range of material to present the story of how an investigative field – at one time dominated by the study of dreams – slowly morphed into a laboratory-based discipline.”

    The magnitude of such a project is not lost on me – from the figurative weight of UTP’s history represented in this series to the literal weight of all the books that are sent for scanning! Since 2014, we have brought nearly 1,000 titles back into circulation and over 1,600 titles will end up in the Heritage Project. It has been and continues to be a tremendous effort supported by continuously improving scanning and printing technology and more importantly, many people at University of Toronto Press, University of Toronto libraries, and the Toronto Reference Library.

    Whether you are reading any of these titles out of interest (and maybe even indulging your nostalgia of a childhood dream) or as a way to support your research and work, I hope they will be invaluable learning resources for you, too.

    To continue on the final day of the University Press Week Blog Tour, check out posts by these other fine university presses:

    Johns Hopkins University Press
    Blog: https://www.press.jhu.edu/news/blog
    Twitter: @JHUPress

    Princeton University Press
    Blog: http://blog.press.princeton.edu/
    Twitter: @PrincetonUPress

    Rutgers University Press
    Blog: https://www.rutgersuniversitypress.org/category/news/
    Twitter: @RutgersUPress

    University of Colorado Press
    Blog: https://upcolorado.com/about-us/blog
    Twitter: @UPColorado

    Columbia University Press
    Blog: cupblog.org
    Twitter: @ColumbiaUP

    University of Georgia Press
    Blog: www.ugapress.wordpress.com
    Twitter: @UGAPress

Items 1 to 5 of 112 total