University of Toronto Press Blog

  • UTP Goes to Congress: Enter Our Twitter Contest!

    Our team is on its way to the beautiful University of British Columbia for Congress! Heading to BC? Plan to drop by the UTP display to meet with editors, grab some swag, and enter our contests – and, of course, add a book or two to your reading list.

    First up: we’ll be kicking off the week with a Twitter contest. It’s easy: during Congress, follow us @utpress and send out a tweet using the hashtag #UTPGoesToCongress. You’ll be entered to win a prize pack of our top titles in higher ed. Hanging out at Congress and aren’t on Twitter? Stop by the UTP booth and sign up for our newsletter for another chance to win. Never miss an update and you may have some great reads heading your way...

    Learn more about our higher ed prize pack:

    Work Your Career: Get What You Want from Your Social Sciences or Humanities PhD

    How do you choose between a non-academic and an academic career? Prepare for both from your first day on campus! Authors Jonathan Malloy and Loleen Berdahl show how your PhD can take you down any number of paths. Filled with practical, no-nonsense advice tailored to you, you'll want this handy guide beside you every step of the way.


    The Craft of University Teaching

    How does university instruction look when it’s approached as a craft? In an era of bureaucratic oversight, diminishing budgets, and technological distraction, Peter Lindsay seeks to reclaim teaching as the rewarding endeavor it is.

     


    The Slow Professor: Challenging the Culture of Speed in the Academy

    A must-read for anyone in academia concerned about the frantic pace of contemporary university life. Focusing on individual faculty members and their own professional practice, Maggie Berg and Barbara Seeber present both an analysis of the culture of speed in the academy and ways of alleviating stress while improving teaching, research, and collegiality.


    Course Correction: A Map for the Distracted University

    The university’s business, Paul Gooch writes, is to generate and critique knowledge claims, and to transmit and certify the acquisition of knowledge. Course Correction engages in deliberation about what the twenty-first-century university needs to do in order to re-find its focus as a protected place for unfettered commitment to knowledge, not just as a space for creating employment or economic prosperity.


    Kickstarting Your Academic Career: Skills to Succeed in the Social Sciences

    An essential primer on the common scholastic demands that social sciences students face upon entering college or university. Based on the challenges that instructors most often find students need help with, Robert Ostergard Jr. and Stacy Fisher offer practical advice and tips on topics such as how to communicate with instructors, take notes, read a textbook, research and write papers, and write successful exams.

     


    Contest Rules and Regulations – University of Toronto Press
    Open to residents of Canada (excluding the Province of Quebec)

    1. CONTEST PERIOD: The 2019 University of Toronto Press Twitter contest commences at 12:00 AM Eastern Time (“ET”) on June 1, 2019, and will end at June 8, 2019 (the “Contest Period”). All times are Eastern Times.

    2. RULES: By entering this Contest, entrants agree to abide by these Contest rules and regulations (the “Official Rules”). The decisions of the independent contest organization with respect to all aspects of the Contest are final. These rules are posted at http://blog.utorontopress.com/2019/05/30/utp-congress-twitter-contest

    3. ELIGIBILITY: To enter the win the Contest and be eligible to win a Prize (see rule 6), a person (“Entrant”) must, at the time of entry, be a legal resident of Canada (excluding the Province of Quebec) who has reached the age of majority in his/her province or territory of residence. The following individuals and members of such person’s immediate family (including mother, father, brothers, sisters, sons, daughters, partner or spouse regardless of where they live) or persons with whom they are domiciled (whether related to the person or not) are not eligible to enter the Contest: employees, officers, directors, shareholders, owners, general and limited partners, agents, representatives, successors.

    4. HOW TO ENTER: During the Contest period, follow @utpress on Twitter, and tweet using the hashtag #UTPGoesToCongress that pertains to the Contest. Limit one (1) entry per person per day during the contest Period regardless of method of entry. Any person who is found to have entered in a fashion not sanctioned by these Official Rules will be disqualified.

    5. PRIZE: The winner will receive one (1) print copy of each of the following: Course Correction, The Slow Professor, Work Your Career, Kickstarting Your Academic Career, and The Craft of University Teaching.

    6. DRAW:

    i. The random draw will include all eligible entries, and will take place on June 9, 2019 at 12:00 PM at the University of Toronto Press offices, located at 800 Bay St. Mezzanine, Toronto, Ontario, M5S 3A9.

    ii. The winner will be contacted via social media, and will be included in the announcement on Twitter. If a selected Entrant cannot be reached via social media within 7 days of the draw, then he/she will be disqualified and another Entrant will be randomly selected until such time as contact is made via social media with a selected Entrant that satisfies the foregoing requirements or there are no more eligible entries, whichever comes first. University of Toronto Press will not be responsible for failed attempts to contact a selected Entrant.

    7. CONDITIONS OF ENTRY: By entering the Contest, Entrants (i) confirm compliance with these Official Rules including all eligibility requirements, and (ii) agree to be bound by these Official Rules and by the decisions of University of Toronto Press, made in its sole discretion, which shall be final and binding in all matters relating to this Contest. Entrants who have not complied with these Official Rules are subject to disqualification.

    8. CONSENT TO USE PERSONAL INFORMATION: University of Toronto Press respects your right to privacy. The information you provided will only be used for the purpose of administering this Contest and prize fulfillment. For more information regarding University of Toronto Press’s privacy statement, please visit https://utorontopress.com/ca/privacy-policy.

  • UTP Goes to Congress 2019

    With summer fast approaching, that can only mean one thing here at UTP. Yes, we're packing our bags and heading to Congress 2019 in gorgeous Vancouver, BC. We will be mounting our largest ever display of books in Vancouver, and we'll be teaming up with our Journals and Distribution divisions to showcase an even wider range of publications.

    Whether you are attending your association’s conference or are a member of the Vancouver community, we would love to see you. Don’t miss this opportunity to develop your social network, or maybe add some fabulous UTP books to your home or office library. You can find us at the Congress Expo, located in the Congress Hub. You can also follow us on Twitter throughout the conference for regular updates.

    In this blog post, we've listed a number of key events throughout the week of Congress that you should mark in your calendars. We hope to see you in Vancouver!


    Key Events at Congress

    Sunday, June 2, 2019: 10:30 AM - 11:30 AM (AMS Nest - NEST 2301 Expo Event Space)

    Book Launch: Amplify

    Join us for the book launch of Amplify, where author Norah Bowman will discuss this latest addition in graphic storytelling.

    In this highly original text – a collaboration between a college professor, a playwright, and an artist – graphic storytelling offers a unique way for readers to understand and engage with feminism and resistance in a more emotionally resonant way.


    Sunday, June 2, 2019: 12:00 PM-1:00 PM (Laserre 102)

    CAS Book Celebration

    Come and learn about the books that have been published in 2018-19 and meet their authors. Some copies will be available for purchase and/or author signing. Natalie Kononenko will be in attendance to launch her new book Ukrainian Epic and Historical Song, and Erica L. Fraser will be there to celebrate her book Military Masculinity and Postwar Recovery in the Soviet Union.


    Monday, June 3, 2019: 5:30 PM - 8:00 PM (Ideas Lounge and Patio)

    Reception of the Canadian Committee on Women’s History

    Featuring Reading Canadian Women’s and Gender Historyedited by Nancy Janovicek and Carmen Nielson.

    Inspired by the question of "what’s next?" in the field of Canadian women’s and gender history, this broadly historiographical volume represents a conversation among established and emerging scholars who share a commitment to understanding the past from intersectional feminist perspectives.


    Monday, June 3, 2019: 6:00 PM - 8:25 PM (Wise Hall, 1882 Adanac Street, Vancouver, BC, V5L 2E2)

    Marvellous Grounds: Queering Urban Justice

    A discussion with the editors of the Marvellous Grounds Collective on queering urban justice and challenging racialized state formations and geographies.

    Speakers:
    • Ghaida Moussa, PHD Student York University, PhD Student York University
    • Jin Haritaworn, Professor, York University, Professor, York University
    • Syrus Marcus Ware, PhD Student York University

    Tuesday, June 4, 2019: 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

    Book Launch for A Violent History of Benevolence

    Following on from the Queer Caucus meeting at noon, The Canadian Association for Social Work Education will be hosting the launch for A Violent History of Benevolence by Chris Chapman and A.J. Withers.

    The book traces how normative histories of liberalism, progress, and social work enact and obscure systemic violences.


    Tuesday, June 4, 2019: 3:00 PM - 3:30 PM (Dorothy Somerset Studio - Room 101)

    Coffee Break and Book Launch: Insecurity

    The Canadian Association for Theatre Research will be hosting a book launch for Dr. Jenn Stephenson's new book Insecurity: Perils and Products of Theatres of the Real.

    "This book offers a compelling and timely investigation of the ‘real’, ably and amply illustrated by a diversity of case studies. A must-read addition to scholarship on Canadian theatre and performance."

    Susan Bennett, Department of English, University of Calgary


    Wednesday, June 5, 2019: 12:00 PM - 1:30 PM (Buchanan Tower 1197)

    Book Launch for Violence, Order, and Unrest

    The Canadian Historical Association will be hosting a book launch for Violence, Order, and Unrest edited by Elizabeth Mancke, Jerry Bannister, Denis McKim, and Scott W. See.

    This edited collection offers a broad reinterpretation of the origins of Canada. Drawing on cutting-edge research in a number of fields, Violence, Order, and Unrest explores the development of British North America from the mid-eighteenth century through the aftermath of Confederation.


    Wednesday, June 5, 2019: 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM (AMS Nest - NEST 2301 Expo Event Space)

    Peter Lindsay on The Craft of University Teaching

    What does university teaching – as a craft – look like? What changes does a craft perspective suggest for higher education? These questions will be addressed in both a general sense – What does the act of teaching become when treated as a craft? What changes to a professor’s educational philosophy does it require? – and with respect to the practical, everyday tasks of university professors, such as the use and misuse of technology, the handling of academic dishonesty, the assignment of course reading, and the instilling of enthusiasm for learning. Join author Peter Lindsay as he addresses these questions, outlined in his book, The Craft of University Teaching.


    Thursday, June 6, 2019: 3:30 PM - 5:00 PM (AMS Nest - NEST 2306)

    Work Your Career: How to Strategically Position Yourself for Career Success

    How can prospective and recent PhD students best position themselves for rewarding careers? Do you have to choose between preparing for an academic or non-academic career path? Drawing on research and their personal career histories in the nonprofit, government and academic sectors, the speakers will outline tools to: identify current career competencies and networks; create an action plan to increase competitiveness for both academic and non-academic careers simultaneously; and articulate competencies to potential employers. Current and recent PhD students, postdoctoral fellows, and graduate supervisors and chairs in the social sciences and humanities should plan to attend.

    Speakers:
    • Loleen Berdahl, Professor and Head, Department of Political Studies, University of Saskatchewan
    • Jonathan Malloy, Professor, Department of Political Science, Carleton University

    Thursday, June 6, 2019: 6:00 Pm - 8:00 PM (Indian Residential School History and Dialogue Centre - IRSHDC Main Room)

    Genocide, Residential Schools, and the Challenge of [Re]Conciliation: Dialogue and Panel Discussion

    Join in a panel discussion and dialogue with Professor David MacDonald (Guelph University) and Dr. Sheryl Lightfoot (University of British Columbia). as they discuss MacDonald’s new book, The Sleeping Giant Awakes: Genocide, Indian Residential Schools and the Challenge of Conciliation.

    Speakers:
    • David MacDonald, Guelph University
    • Dr. Sheryl Lightfoot, UBC

  • Hollywood Comes to Canada: The Making of Captains of the Clouds

    Written by guest blogger Dr. Jessica Leonora Whitehead

    During the Oscars this year a new PSA aired from the Canadian Media Fund, launching the MADE Campaign, which celebrates the work of Canadians in the film industry from both home and abroad. Narrated by Christopher Plumber, scenes from Hollywood productions like Deadpool, The Handmaid’s Tale, and Spiderman are shown as Christopher Plumber tells the audience: “This is Canadian content and it’s time we take credit for it. Starting now.” While today Canada is labeled Hollywood North with Canadian cities like Toronto, Vancouver, and even the Northern Ontario cities of Sudbury and North Bay acting as regular shooting locations for American productions, this was not always the case. My article for the Canadian Journal of Film Studies explores the historical roots of Canada as a shooting location for Hollywood films by examining one of the first Hollywood features shot in Canada, the 1942 war epic Captains of the Clouds.



    The concept for Captains of the Clouds was developed in conjunction with the Canadian government and Warner Brother Studios. In 1941, the United States had not yet entered the war, but many Americans were joining the Royal Canadian Air force (RCAF) thanks in part to Canadian lobbying groups like the Clayton Knight Committee, which encouraged Americans to join the war effort. The RCAF wanted to partner with Hollywood to showcase their air training plan and signed a contract with Warner Brothers on 28 January 1941 at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel, which was also, probably not coincidentally, the headquarters of the Clayton Knight Committee. Shortly after the deal was signed, RCAF Lieutenant Owen Cathcart-Jones was sent to California to work as an advisor on the film about two Canadian bush pilots, who join the RCAF to support the war effort.

    Much to the chagrin of Hollywood, one of the Canadian government’s only stipulations about the film, other than they agree to show the RCAF in a positive light, was that the film had to be shot in Canada. The government hoped that the film would give jobs to Canadians, but instead the entire cast and crew came to Canada from Hollywood, which the North Bay Nugget described as a “Cavalcade to Canada.”

    A page from the North Bay Nugget about the production of the film dated 6 March 1941, 20

    One of the largest roles to go to a Canadian was Brenda Marshall’s stand in who was an Ottawa woman by the name of Rita Cross and she received front-page coverage in Canadian newspapers. The focused coverage for a stand in role is in many ways the perfect metaphor for Canada’s relationship with Hollywood because despite decades of attempts Canada remains as a peripheral force in the film industry. In the case of Captains of the Clouds, Warner Brothers completely rewrote the script, the production crew fought the inclusion of Canadian workers on the set, and most of the Canadian actors that appeared in the film were stand-ins and extras.

    Rita Cross on the cover of the North Bay Nugget dated 31 July 1941, 1.

    The American producers left with a negative view of the country and wrote in one of their reports that the people of North Bay were thirty years behind in everything and that they would never want to leave their studio in Burbank again. It would not be until decades later that Canada was made into a regular shooting location for Hollywood, but the production of Captain of the Clouds highlights the historical roots for Canada as a shooting location for Hollywood films. Although today the MADE Campaign is trying to label Hollywood films shot in Canada as Canadian content my article demonstrates how Canada often has a stand in role when Hollywood comes to town.

    Dr. Jessica Leonora Whitehead will be starting an Arts and Science Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of Toronto in July and holds a PhD from York University. Her dissertation, Cinema-Going on the Margins: The Mascioli Film Circuit of Northeastern Ontario was funded by a SSHRC Joseph-Armand Bombardier Canada Graduate Scholarship, and was nominated for both York University’s Dissertation Award and the Barbara Godard Dissertation Award. Her research is also supported by the Italian American Studies Association Memorial Fellowship, which she was awarded in 2018. She has published articles in the journals Transformative Works and Cultures, Italian Canadiana and chapters in the books Cinema Outside the City: Rural Cinema-going from a Global Perspective and Mapping Movie Magazines. In addition, she is the co-editor of an upcoming collection in the journal TMJ: Journal for Media History. Her research has also been featured on the CBC’s radio show Up North and in the Timmins Daily Press.

    Read Dr. Whitehead's latest article, “Hollywood Goes North: The Making of a ‘Canadian’ War Epic, Captains of the Clouds” free to read for a limited time here.

  • Retracing the Steps of Mackenzie King in Nazi-Era Berlin

    Mackenzie King reviewing participants in the women’s and men’s tennis events at the German All-German Sports Competitions, 27 July 1937. Front row, left to right: Robert Ley, head of the German Labour Front, Prime Minister King, King’s personal secretary Edward Pickering, and Hans von Tschammer und Osten, Reich Sports Leader.

    In 1937, Canadian Prime Minister Mackenzie King travelled to Nazi Germany in an attempt to prevent a war that, to many observers, seemed inevitable. The men King communed with, including Adolf Hitler, had assured him of the Nazi regime’s peaceful intentions, and King not only found their pledges sincere, but even hoped for personal friendships with many of the regime officials. 

    Four Days in Hitler's Germany addresses how King truly believed that any threat to peace would come only from those individuals who intended to thwart the Nazi agenda, which as King saw it, was concerned primarily with justifiable German territorial and diplomatic readjustments. In this post, author Robert Teigrob shares how walking the city streets of Berlin led him to write his new book.


    For the last decade I have taught a summer course in Berlin. For a historian, the city is an endless trove of commemorative spaces, architectural motifs, and museum collections that attest to some of humanity’s darkest, as well as noblest, impulses. It is a built environment perpetually under revision and renewal, a testament to both the destruction and political dismemberment wrought by Hitler’s war, and to a deeply-engaged and increasingly diverse population’s struggle to properly represent and confront the past. This struggle has many outcomes: the demolition of what Germans call “historically burdened buildings,” the preservation of others as historic sites, the repurposing of still others toward more life-affirmative ends, and seemingly on every block, a memorial to the events and people that make up Berlin’s tumultuous history.

    Walking the city a few years ago sparked a couple of ideas that became the genesis of my new book, Four Days in Hitler’s Germany: Mackenzie King’s Mission to Avert a Second World War. I recalled a picture from my high school history textbook showing a very jovial Prime Minister Mackenzie King touring a Berlin factory complex in 1937 – the same one I was now passing – escorted by top Nazi officials. I was struck by the contrast between modern Germans’ evident willingness to own up to the mistakes of the past and, on this count, the comparative reticence among Canadians to do the same. For in that same textbook (and as I was to learn, in many other historical accounts), King’s visit was portrayed as a stern warning to the Hitler regime that any Nazi aggression would stimulate a powerful and unified response from the Western powers. I knew this to be something of an oversimplification – King was in fact one of the globe’s foremost advocates of appeasement, and had enthusiastically shepherded a trade agreement with Germany through Parliament just before his visit – but the more I dug into the records, the more stunning the prime minister’s interactions with Nazi officials became. I came to the conclusion that the 1937 visit deserved a sustained, critical analysis.

    Roaming Berlin also led me to wonder how future generations of Canadians will judge our relationships with today’s global community. We see intense debates in the House of Commons and the media over how to balance our economic interests with our stated commitment to human rights and international laws and norms: how to square principles with profit-making in the proposed sale of weapons to authoritarian regimes; whether to “constructively engage” or shun potential trading partners that flout the rule of law (and for that matter, how to respond to some of our own companies’ controversial activities abroad – in the mining sector, for instance). Canada and the world wrestled with similar issues in the 1930s, and the recent ascent of regimes and political movements built on ethnic nationalism, militarism, and regressive attitudes toward the multinational international order painstakingly constructed since 1945 gives the story of King’s visit to Germany a decidedly contemporary aura.


    Robert Teigrob is a professor in the Department of History at Ryerson University and the author of Four Days in Hitler's Germany.

  • Survey Research, Public Opinion, and the Canadian Market Research Industry

    Written by guest blogger Christopher Adams.
    Ten years ago, I was asked to write a chapter titled “Public Opinion Polling in Canada” for Mediating Canadian Politics, a collection of essays co-edited by professors Shannon Sampert and Linda Trimble. The focus of the piece was on polling during Canadian election campaigns. The chapter commenced with a description of how the American pollster, George Gallup, opened up shop in Toronto in 1941. The discussion then proceeded to how polls have evolved as an important tool for understanding what Canadian are thinking, and are now heavily used by the media and party strategists.

    Without being aware of this, I had set out on a much larger project: to write a history of public opinion research in Canada. The recently published article for the Journal of Canadian Studies, titled “Canada’s Early Developments in the Public Opinion Research Industry,” is part of this. Here I write about what could be described as the “pre-Gallup” days, about how the government, media, advertising agencies, and research firms became increasingly involved in using surveys to study Canadian attitudes, preferences, and behaviours in the early decades of the past century.

    Canadians were surveyed in many ways during the past century. This included face-to-face interviews, telephone interviews, and online surveys. There were also many ways by which completed questionnaires were processed, including the use of electronic tabulating machines and computer keypunching. Moreover, survey results were put to various uses, including providing media content, assessing the public’s mood on political issues, and developing brand strategies.

    It is no secret that the research industry is undergoing transformational change. Before jumping into my current career as a senior administrator for a university college, I worked in the industry for close to 20 years. Up until the late 1990s, the standard approach to gauging the public’s mood was by doing a telephone survey. This would involve designing a questionnaire, and then relying on live interviewers to call randomly selected households during a series of evenings.

    Things have changed, as made evident by how election polls are now done. Just recently, I have been working on a conference paper for the upcoming annual meeting of the Canadian Political Science Association (to be held in Vancouver in early June). As I write in this paper, many Canadians have become difficult to reach due to their increased reliance on mobile devices in place of landline telephones. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) reports that from 2012 to 2016, landline telephone subscriptions in Canadian households declined from 83.8 percent to 66.8 percent, while subscriptions to mobile devices such as cellular telephones, increased from 81.3 percent to 87.9 percent of Canadian households (CRTC, 2018). To address this phenomenon, polling firms now obtain sample containing both mobile phones and landline phones. One CEO of a polling firm informed me that his firm seeks to have close to 50% of their sample containing mobile phone numbers while another firm has pre-established quotas for their studies that a minimum of 20 percent of their completed surveys are done through a mobile device.

    To show how things have changed over the past 100 years, for my conference paper I have now reviewed a total of 43 polls that were released to the public in the final five days of all federal and provincial elections held from the beginning of 2015 to the end of 2018. Only one of these polls was based wholly on live telephone interviews, while five included both live telephone interviews and online surveys. All of the other 37 polls were based on either online surveys or Interactive Voice Response (IVR) surveys (IVR surveys involve automated calling and interviews by which respondents use their telephone keys pads to respond to questions).

    Research industry practices have come a long way over the past century, and the use of paper and pen surveys and telephone surveys using live interviewers now seem antiquated. Nevertheless, at the core of the industry there has been, and always will be, a need to ensure that survey questions are properly designed, and that samples are representative of the population under study. It is in the early era, i.e. the early 1900s and up to the early 1940s, as my piece for the Journal of Canadian Studies shows, that the survey research industry and its practitioners were developing the tools of their craft.

    Christopher Adams holds a PhD in Political Science from Carleton University, and worked in the market research industry from 1995 to 2012. Since 2012, he has served as the chair of the Arthur V. Mauro Centre for Peace and Justice and is rector of St. Paul’s College at the University of Manitoba. In 2018, he co-authored the MRIA-sponsored review regarding polling errors during the 2017 Calgary election (https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/calgary/calgary-municipal-election-poll-mria-report-release-1.4776633). Dr. Adams is a writer and frequent commentator on issues relating to Canadian politics and polling and is currently writing a history of the polling industry in Canada.

    His latest Journal of Canadian Studies article, “Canada’s Early Developments in the Public Opinion Research Industry” is temporarily free to read on UTP Journals Online.

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