Blurred Nationalities across the North Atlantic: Traders, Priests, and Their Kin Travelling between North America and the Italian Peninsula, 1763–1846

By Luca Codignola

© 2018

Long before the mid-nineteenth century, thousands of people were constantly moving between the United States and British North America and Leghorn, Genoa, Naples, Rome, Sicily, Piedmont, Lombardy, Venice, and Trieste. Predominantly traders, sailors, transient workers, Catholic priests, and seminarians, this group relied on the exchange of goods across the Atlantic to solidify transatlantic relations; during this period, stories about the New World passed between travellers through word of mouth and letter writing.

Blurred Nationalities challenges the idea that national origin, for instance, Italianness, comprises the only significant feature of a group’s identity, and reveals instead the multifaceted personalities of the people involved in these exchanges.

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Product Details

  • Series: Emilio Goggio Publications Series
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 552 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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  • AVAILABLE FEB 2019

    From: $93.75

    Regular Price: $125.00

    ISBN 9781487504564
  • AVAILABLE MAR 2019

    From: $93.75

    Regular Price: $125.00

Quick Overview

A new examination of transatlantic mobility between early North America and the Italian peninsula. Based on a vast array of previously untapped archival sources, this book shows the international outlook and the multifaceted personalities of its protagonists.

Blurred Nationalities across the North Atlantic: Traders, Priests, and Their Kin Travelling between North America and the Italian Peninsula, 1763–1846

By Luca Codignola

© 2018

Long before the mid-nineteenth century, thousands of people were constantly moving between the United States and British North America and Leghorn, Genoa, Naples, Rome, Sicily, Piedmont, Lombardy, Venice, and Trieste. Predominantly traders, sailors, transient workers, Catholic priests, and seminarians, this group relied on the exchange of goods across the Atlantic to solidify transatlantic relations; during this period, stories about the New World passed between travellers through word of mouth and letter writing.

Blurred Nationalities challenges the idea that national origin, for instance, Italianness, comprises the only significant feature of a group’s identity, and reveals instead the multifaceted personalities of the people involved in these exchanges.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Emilio Goggio Publications Series
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 552 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "Blurred Nationalities across the North Atlantic represents a historical ‘cross-over,’ where the history of Italy, Italian migration, Catholicism, and colonial North America are questioned simultaneously. In this way, Luca Codignola answers many questions, including why Italians migrated to North America, how they were accepted, and what kind of relationship was linking Italy to North America. Codignola has written a very important contribution to the study of transatlantic history between the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries."


    Matteo Sanfilippo, Dipartimento di Scienze Umane e della Comunicazione, Università degli Studi della Tuscia

    "In examining the mobility of ideas, trade, and Catholic networks, Blurred Nationalities across the North Atlantic convincingly reveals the significant impact of merchants, missionaries, priests, and lay travellers from both North America and Italy, while connecting them to enlightenment ideals. It is a model of the kind of research any historian might wish to teach advanced students."


    Donna Gabaccia, Department of Historical and Cultural Studies, University of Toronto, Scarborough
  • Author Information

    Luca Codignola is a Senior Fellow at the University of Notre Dame, Adjunct Professor at Saint Mary’s University, Halifax, and Professeur Associé at Université de Montréal.
  • Table of contents

    Foreword by Olga Zorzi Pugliese
    Preface and Acknowledgements
    Contents
    Abbreviations

    Introduction: "Contributors" and the "Enlightened" or, the Invention of Italianness
    Colombo, Caboto, Verrazzano: Allegiance to What?
    From Bressani the Jesuit to Castiglioni the Traveller
    Were Travel Reports Trustworthy and Influential?
    The "Contribution School": The Illusory Search for Completeness
    The "Enlightenment School": Were They All Real Italians?

    1. Early Relations between the Italian Peninsula and North America: Cod Fish, Leghorn, and Genoa, 1744–1839
    The Cod Fish Networks, 1766–85
    Leghorn, 1744–88
    Genoa, 1759–1839

    2. Early Relations between the Italian Peninsula and North America: Naples, Turin, Venice, Trieste, and Milan, 1761–1825
    Naples and Sicily, 1778–1809
    Turin and Piedmont, 1777–1825
    Venice and Trieste, 1761–96
    Milan and Lombardy, 1784–1824

    3. Rome, the Italian Peninsula's Most International Capital: Students, Consuls, and Distinguished Visitors, 1788–1848
    Two American Young Men in the Eternal City, 1788–97
    Sartori's Double Allegiance: Roman and American Consul, 1793–1841
    Cicognani: Rome's Trusted American Consul, 1810–48
    Literary Legacy: Thayer, Plessis, and Grassi, 1783–1820

    4. Rome: Priests across the Ocean and the Extent of Romanization, 1801–36
    Rome's Catholic Priests Go to North America: Their Background and Heritage, 1801–30
    North American Priests in Rome: Competing Networks, 1815–30
    The Moulding of a North American Catholic Élite: The Urban College, 1815–36
    The Moulding of a North American Catholic Élite: The Roman College, 1818–29

    5. North Atlantic Networks of Trade and Religion: Leghorn and Filippo Filicchi, 1788–1816
    F. Filicchi's and A. Filicchi's Role in Leghorn's Political and Economic Life, 1788–1840
    F. Filicchi's Early Life and Career, 1763–85
    F. Filicchi's Two Visits to the United States, 1785–8, 1789–90
    F. Filicchi: Leghorn's Trusted American Consul, 1794–8  
    Networks of People and Interests: The Seton-Bayley-Curson Extended Family, 1784–1857
    Networks of People and Interests: F. Filicchi, A. Filicchi, and the American Catholics, 1785–1842

    6. Antonio Filicchi's Business and Personal Networks across the North Atlantic, 1816–47
    People, Goods, and Ideas in A. Filicchi's Activities, 1816–47
    The Entrepreneur: Vito Viti, 1828–41
    The Scientist: Carlo L. Bonaparte, Prince of Musignano, 1828–39
    Merchants and Traders, 1828–41
    Artists and Kin, 1828–41

    7. Angelo Inglesi, from Rome with Love: The Ultimate Scoundrel Priest in North America, c.1795–1825
    Inglesi's European Background and Arrival in Quebec City, 1795–1819
    Louisiana: Inglesi Enthrals Bishop Dubourg, 1819–20
    Louisiana: Early Doubts Creep In, 1822–3
    Europe: Inglesi's Fundraising Tour, 1820–1
    Rome: Inglesi, a Man Sent by Providence, 1821
    Rome and Umbria: Suspicions and Reality, 1821
    From Tuscany to France: Inglesi Retraces His Steps, 1822–3
    Philadelphia: Joining the Hogan Schism, 1823
    Philadelphia to Haiti: Inglesi's Ignominious End, 1824–5
    Inglesi's Last Supporters: Father Rese and Consul Deabbate in Defence of a “Son of Italy”, 1823–4

    Conclusion: Lives of Non-Illustrious Men

    Tables
    Cod (Stoccafisso), Salted Cod (Baccalà), and Salmon Imports from North America to Leghorn, 1766–99
    Arrivals (50) in Leghorn of Ships from North America, 1770–4
    Roles of the Crews of Six Leghorn Ships That Voyaged to North America Listed by Hierarchical Standing, 1779–85
    Ships in Genoa, 1785–94
    Ships in Genoa, 1815–7
    Ships and Atlantic Crossings from and to Leghorn, 1792–5
    Registered Visitors to the Consulate of the United States in Rome, 1824–35
    North American Students at the Urban College, Rome, 1788–1842
    Alabaster and Marble as Mentioned in the Documents of the Lettere Series in the Archivio Filicchi, 1828–41

    Bibliography
    Primary Sources
    Archival Sources
    Reference Works
    Books
    Periodicals
    Secondary Sources

    Index