Canadian Journal of Film Studies

Edited by Marc Furstenau & Jerry White

Published biannually | E-ISSN 2561-424X | ISSN 0847-5911 Paru en biannually | E-ISSN 2561-424X | ISSN 0847-5911 Version Française English Version

This Journal is online at:

CJFS Online

Join the conversation
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
Joignez-vous à la conversation
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

The Canadian Journal of Film Studies / Revue Canadienne d'etudes cinematographiques is Canada's leading academic peer-reviewed film journal. We have published bi-annually since launching in 1990.

CJFS / RCÉC publishes scholarly articles on film, television, and other audio-visual media. Subjects may be either Canadian or any other national or transnational cinema. We also publish reviews and review-essays of recent books in film and media studies.

Other occasional features of CJFS/RCEC are “Ciné-Documents” (rare and archival materials relevant to film study), and “Ciné-Forum,” in which we publish short articles on any topic of interest to film and media students and scholars. Possible topics include debates on current contributions to film theory, history, criticism, and pedagogy; information about archives, special collections, and other sources for research; commentary on little-known or under-appreciated individuals, organizations, and films; translations; interviews; reviews of DVDs that have particular relevance to archival, critical, or pedagogical aspects of film studies.

CJFS / RCÉC is co-edited by Marc Furstenau (Associate Professor, Film Studies, Carleton University) and Jerry White (Associate Professor, English, Dalhousie University). We are funded by the Film Studies Association of Canada / Association canadienne des études cinématographiques and SSHRC / CRSH. Additional support provided by the School for Studies in Art and Culture, Carleton University, and the Department of English, Dalhousie University.

Continue Reading Read Less

Revue canadienne d'études cinématographiques

Sous la direction de Marc Furstenau & Jerry White

Published biannually | E-ISSN 2561-424X | ISSN 0847-5911 Paru en biannually | E-ISSN 2561-424X | ISSN 0847-5911 Version Française English Version

This Journal is online at:

CJFS Online

Join the conversation
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
Joignez-vous à la conversation
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Le Canadian Journal of Film Studies / Revue canadienne d'études cinématographiques est la principale revue universitaire canadienne d'études cinématographiques évaluée par les pairs. Le CJFS / RCÉC est publié deux fois par an depuis son lancement en 1990.

Le CJFS / RCÉC publie principalement des articles spécialisés sur le cinéma, la télévision et d’autres médias des images animées, mais également des critiques de livres et des comptes-rendus critiques.

Le CJFS / RCÉC présente occasionnellement des « ciné-documents » (des documents d’archive rares et pertinents dans le cadre des études cinématographiques et des médias d’images animées) et des « ciné-forums » dans lesquels elle publie de courts articles sur tout sujet pouvant intéresser les chercheurs et les étudiants de cinéma et de médias. Voici quelques sujets proposés : discussions sur les contributions faites actuellement à la pédagogie, à la critique, à l’histoire et à la théorie du cinéma et des médias; renseignements à propos d’archives, de collections spéciales et d’autres sources d’informations; traductions; entrevues; critiques de DVD particulièrement pertinentes par rapport à l’information, aux critiques ou à la pédagogie des études du cinéma et des médias des images animées.

Plus Moins
Product Formats

SKU# 0847-5911

From: $50.00

* Required Fields

Quick Overview

The Canadian Journal of Film Studies / Revue canadienne d'études cinématographiques is Canada's leading academic peer-reviewed film journal. CJFS / RCÉC has published bi-annually since its launch in 1990.

Le Canadian Journal of Film Studies / Revue canadienne d'études cinématographiques est la principale revue universitaire canadienne d'études cinématographiques évaluée par les pairs. Le CJFS / RCÉC est publié deux fois par an depuis son lancement en 1990.

Canadian Journal of Film Studies

Edited by Marc Furstenau & Jerry White

Published biannually | E-ISSN 2561-424X | ISSN 0847-5911 Paru en biannually | E-ISSN 2561-424X | ISSN 0847-5911 Version Française English Version

This Journal is online at:

CJFS Online

Join the conversation
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
Joignez-vous à la conversation
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

The Canadian Journal of Film Studies / Revue Canadienne d'etudes cinematographiques is Canada's leading academic peer-reviewed film journal. We have published bi-annually since launching in 1990.

CJFS / RCÉC publishes scholarly articles on film, television, and other audio-visual media. Subjects may be either Canadian or any other national or transnational cinema. We also publish reviews and review-essays of recent books in film and media studies.

Other occasional features of CJFS/RCEC are “Ciné-Documents” (rare and archival materials relevant to film study), and “Ciné-Forum,” in which we publish short articles on any topic of interest to film and media students and scholars. Possible topics include debates on current contributions to film theory, history, criticism, and pedagogy; information about archives, special collections, and other sources for research; commentary on little-known or under-appreciated individuals, organizations, and films; translations; interviews; reviews of DVDs that have particular relevance to archival, critical, or pedagogical aspects of film studies.

CJFS / RCÉC is co-edited by Marc Furstenau (Associate Professor, Film Studies, Carleton University) and Jerry White (Associate Professor, English, Dalhousie University). We are funded by the Film Studies Association of Canada / Association canadienne des études cinématographiques and SSHRC / CRSH. Additional support provided by the School for Studies in Art and Culture, Carleton University, and the Department of English, Dalhousie University.

Continue Reading Read Less

Le Canadian Journal of Film Studies / Revue canadienne d'études cinématographiques est la principale revue universitaire canadienne d'études cinématographiques évaluée par les pairs. Le CJFS / RCÉC est publié deux fois par an depuis son lancement en 1990.

Le CJFS / RCÉC publie principalement des articles spécialisés sur le cinéma, la télévision et d’autres médias des images animées, mais également des critiques de livres et des comptes-rendus critiques.

Le CJFS / RCÉC présente occasionnellement des « ciné-documents » (des documents d’archive rares et pertinents dans le cadre des études cinématographiques et des médias d’images animées) et des « ciné-forums » dans lesquels elle publie de courts articles sur tout sujet pouvant intéresser les chercheurs et les étudiants de cinéma et de médias. Voici quelques sujets proposés : discussions sur les contributions faites actuellement à la pédagogie, à la critique, à l’histoire et à la théorie du cinéma et des médias; renseignements à propos d’archives, de collections spéciales et d’autres sources d’informations; traductions; entrevues; critiques de DVD particulièrement pertinentes par rapport à l’information, aux critiques ou à la pédagogie des études du cinéma et des médias des images animées.

Plus Moins
  • Editorial board

    Editors | Directeurs

    Marc Furstenau, Carleton University

    Jerry White, Dalhousie University

    Deputy Editor | Directeur adjoint

    Germain Lacasse, Université de Montréal

    Assistant Editor | Rédacteur adjoint

    David Richler, Carleton University

    Editorial Board | Comité de rédaction

    Michael Baker, Chair, Sheridan College

    Christie Milliken, Brock University

    Louis Pelletier, Concordia University

    Diane Burgess, University of British Columbia

    Book Review Editor | Responsable des comptes rendus

    Liz Czach, University of Alberta

    Translation of Abstracts | Traduction des résumés

    Henri Biahé, Dalhousie University

    Jerry White, Dalhousie University

    CJFS/RCÉC Website

    Konstantinos Koutras, Carleton University

    Administrative Support | Soutien administratif

    Mary-Beth MacIsaac, Dalhousie University

    Board of Advisors | Comité consultatif

    Jane Gaines, Columbia University

    André Gaudreault, Université de Montréal

    Charlie Keil, University of Toronto

    Janine Marchessault, York University

    Bill Marshall, University of Stirling

    Toby Miller, University of California at Riverside

    Bill Nichols, San Francisco State University

    Patrice Petro, University of Wisconsin

    Dana Polan, New York University

    Philip Rosen, Brown University

    Geneviève Sellier, Université de Caen

    Janet Staiger, University of Texas at Austin

  • Open Access Policy

    In response to the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications, Canadian Journal of Film Studies has developed a plan to ensure authors are able to comply with the policy. There are two flavours of open access allowed by the Tri-Agency - green and gold - and we have an option for both.

    Green Open Access

    Twelve (12) months after publication of the version of record (i.e., the article after copyediting, tagging, typesetting, etc.), the author may deposit a copy of the accepted article in their institutional repository. Please let us know when the deposit is made so that we can update our records.

    Gold Open Access

    At publication, the final version of record will become freely available on our primary platform, utpjournals.press. The Author Publication Charge is $3,000.

  • Abstracting and indexing

    The Canadian Journal of Film Studies | Revue canadienne d’études cinématographiques is indexed by the Federation Internationale des Archives du Film (FIAF) and its published listing, the International Index to Film/Television Periodicals, Film Literature Index, Media Review Digest, and Post Script and online in Canadian Index, Canadian Business, International Filmarchives Database, Film Index International, MLA International Bibliog-raphy, Post Script, ProQuest, and JSTOR.
  • Author resources

    PDF

    Subject Matter and Scope

    The Canadian Journal of Film Studies | Revue canadienne d’études cinématographiques (CJFS / RCÉC) is Canada’s leading academic peer-reviewed film journal. We have published bi-annually since launching in 1990.

    CJFS / RCÉC is published with the support of the Film Studies Association of Canada / Association canadienne des études cinématographiques and SSHRC / CRSH. Additional support provided by the School for Studies in Art and Culture, Carleton University, and the Department of English, Dalhousie University. CJFS / RCÉC is published by the University of Toronto Press.

    Peer-Review Process

    CJFS / RCÉC uses a bilingual online peer-review system called ScholarOne Manuscripts where authors, peer reviewers, and book reviewers can submit articles, evaluations, and book reviews online. From initial submissions to final acceptance, ScholarOne Manuscripts streamlines the publication process to make it easy and effective for authors, reviewers, and editors alike. When your article is ready for submission, you will submit it through the ScholarOne Manuscripts interface.

    Blinding

    The CJFS / RCÉC uses a double-blind peer-review process.

    Blinding a manuscript entails removing all references to your name and publications, and to the setting and participants in your research, where relevant. Appropriately blinding your manuscript requires that you replace your name (and any co-author’s names), wherever it occurs in the text, notes or references, with the word “Author.”

    “Author” is then inserted into the reference list with the other “A” references. Do not insert “Author” references alphabetically with the letter that corresponds to your last name. When blinding the context of your research, use pseudonyms for the names of institutions or participants, and do not identify the city or town in which the research took place if it could serve to identify the participants and/or the institution. For example, “a bilingual university in Ottawa” is inadequate blinding because there is only one such university. Try to avoid including any other characteristics that might lead to the identification of the individuals or institutions involved.

    Please also remove any information that would identify you from the “Properties” section of your Word file.

    Manuscripts that have not been blinded will be returned to the authors for blinding before they are sent out to the reviewers, which delays the publication process. If the article is accepted for publication, authors must restore all personal information and references to their article.

    Manuscript Submission Process

    Prior to submitting your article, you will have to register through the CJFS / RCÉC online peer-review system ScholarOne Manuscripts. You will be submitting your final manuscript as a digital file by using ScholarOne Manuscripts.

    In addition to scholarly articles on film, television, and other moving image media, CJFS / RCÉC publishes book reviews and review-essays. Inquiries may be sent to cjfsedit@filmstudies.ca.

    Other occasional features of CJFS / RCÉC are “Ciné-Documents” (rare and archival materials relevant to the study of moving images) and “Ciné-Forum” in which we publish short articles (maximum 4,000 words) on any topic of interest to film students and scholars. Possible topics include debates on current contributions to film theory, history, criticism, and pedagogy; information about archives, special collections, and other sources for research; translations; interviews; discussions of recent DVD or streaming media releases that have particular relevance to archival, critical, or pedagogical aspects of film studies. All articles must be the author’s original work, previously unpublished, and not being reviewed for publication with another journal.

    After you submit your article, the article will be peer-reviewed by qualified academics in the field. Based on this evaluation, you will receive one of the following responses: accepted as is, rejected, or returned for further revisions. This is a process that can take weeks or months; please be patient.

    Upon initial submission, all supporting files including figures and illustrations, tables, and images must be submitted within the text. Once the manuscript is accepted for publication please use the phrase, “Table/Figure 1 about here” in the approximate places where your table or figure should appear in the final copy of the manuscript and submit your figures as supplementary files with the correct specifications on ScholarOne Manuscripts.

    Manuscript Requirements

    The final revised manuscript in digital format should be single-spaced, preferably in a 12-point font, and must have a complete bibliography of all sources cited. Please keep the word count to approximately 10,000.

    Headings should follow the following format: First-order headings should be in bold typeface; second-order headings should be in italic typeface; third-order headings should be in roman typeface. If there are more than three subheadings, indicate the level as appropriate.

    Except in the most obvious instances (i.e., biblical references), abbreviations should be avoided. For abbreviations of biblical books, see the comprehensive listing compiled by the Journal of Biblical Studies. Please do not improvise on format.

    Use only one space after a period, colon, semicolon, and comma. Use an en dash for date and page ranges, and an em dash (without spaces on either side of it) as an interrupter. Refer to the Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition for further grammatical guidance.

    Avoid page-layout formatting. The text should be aligned flush left and ragged right; do not justify or centre.

    Use hard returns at the end of paragraphs only. Let your software make line breaks (word wrap), and do not add extra line spaces between paragraphs.

    Please do not include any running headers or footers (although page numbers are acceptable).

    Use Microsoft Word’s line-numbering feature (under the Page Layout tab in Office 2010, 2013) so that reviewers can easily reference your work.

    Book Reviews

    If you’re writing a book review, please limit your word count to approximately 1,800 words. It should be formatted as the following:

    Title of Book

    By (Edited by) Author’s First and Last Name OR Editor’s First Name and Last Name

    Publication City (or Cities): Publisher, Year, Roman numbered pages + Arabic numbered pages (includes illustrations, notes, tables, bibliography, and index)

    REVIEWED BY REVIEWER NAME, Affiliation

    Example:

    George Klein and American Cinema: The Movie Business and Film Culture in the Silent Era

    By Joel Frykholm

    London: BFI/Palgrave, 2015, 248pp.

    REVIEWED BY CHARLIE KEIL, University of Toronto

    Citations and Documentation

    All sources must be documented in Chicago Notes style according to the Chicago Manual of Style, latest edition. (Examples of Chicago Notes style follow.)

    Use endnotes, not footnotes, by using the automated feature in Word, which will place superscript numbers, for endnote references, in the main body of the article and then allow you to type your notes at the end of your text. Please add the heading NOTES to this section. Follow the directions for citations in endnotes in The Chicago Manual of Style.

    References to a previously cited work require only the author’s last name and relevant page number(s). Include the title of the work only if more than one work by the same author is cited in the notes. Do not use ‘op. cit.’ Use shortened citations instead of ibid.

    For journal articles list author(s), title, volume number, issue number, year, and page(s):

    Ghislain Thibault, “Filming Simondon: The National Film Board, Education, and Humanism,” Canadian Journal of Film Studies 26.1 (2017): 1–24.

    For an article in an anthology, use the following format:

    Melek Ortabasi, “National History as Otaku Fantasy: Satoshi Kon’s Millennium Actress,” in Japanese Visual Culture: Explorations in the World of Manga and Anime, ed. Mark W. MacWilliams (Armonk, NY and London: M.E. Sharpe, 2008), 274–294.

    For articles in a monthly, bi-monthly, or weekly, include month or month and day along with year and page(s); volume and issue numbers are optional:

    Ed Buscombe, “Man to Man,” Sight and Sound (January 2006): 34.

    Alternatively:

    Ed Buscombe, “Man to Man,” Sight and Sound 16.1 (January 2006): 34.

    For articles in a newspaper, include page number:

    Editorial, Philadelphia Inquirer, 30 July 1990, 2.

    Use full title of journals, not abbreviations.

    Titles of newspapers, books and journals should be italicized, not underlined.

    For reprints and translations of books, include original date of publication:

    Jacques Barzun, Simple and Direct: A Rhetoric for Writers, rev. ed. (1985; repr., Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1994), 152–153.

    • Please note this example is a revised edition; however, if the edition has a number, it would be used instead (e.g., 3rd).

    Pierre Bourdieu, Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgment of Taste (1979), trans. Richard Nice (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1984), 63.

    If the reference has a DOI number, the DOI number should be used in place of a URL.

    References to Films, Television Programs, Videos, or DVDs

    Titles of films, videos and DVDs should be italicized and identified (in parentheses) by name of director(s) and year of release: Exotica (Atom Egoyan, 1994).

    Titles of television series should be italicized: Seeing Things.

    Individual episodes within a series should be cited within double inverted commas: “Seeing in the Country.”  Additional information regarding director, producer and date should be included only if relevant.

    For DVD special editions, include date of release in parentheses.  Additional information regarding DVD editions should be included in an endnote.

    References to Electronic Sources

    Titles of articles in on-line journals should include name of author(s), title of article, name of journal in italics, volume/issue number and date, URL, and date accessed:

    Alain Kerzoncuf and Nándor Boker, “Alfred Hitchcock’s Trailers,” Senses of Cinema, http://www.sensesofcinema.com/contents/05/35/hitchcocks_trailers.html (accessed 6 June 2005).

    Websites should be identified by as much of the following information as is available: author of content, title of the page, title or owner of the site, URL, and date accessed:

    Fred Camper, “My Favorite Films,” Fred Camper’s Web Site, http://www.fredcamper.com/ Film/Filmmakers.html (accessed 5 November 2004).

    Contributions to electronic mail groups (listserves) should be identified by author, subject, name of group/listserve, email address, and date of message:

    Konrad, “Poets do Film: SF Cinematheque Screening,” Experimental Film Discussion List <frameworks@listserv.aol.com>, 28 November 2004.

    The following recommendations address some specific matters of style that arise frequently. For other recommendations concerning style use The Chicago Manual of Style.

    Hyphenation and Spelling

    Hyphenation: follow Concise Oxford if term appears there; if not, use hyphen unless solid form is considered a ‘term of art’

    Spelling dictionary is Canadian Oxford Dictionary.

    The following are preferred:

     

    Anglophone (as noun), anglophone as adjective

    cinemagoer, cinemagoing (as noun), cinema-going (as adjective: the cinema-going experience)

    close-up

    crosscutting (as noun), cross-cut (as verb: they are cross-cut with…)

    filmgoer, filmgoing (as noun), film-going (as adjective: the film-going experience)

    filmmaker, filmmaking

    Francophone (as noun), francophone (as adjective)

    intercutting (as noun), inter-cut (as verb: they are inter-cut with…)

    moviegoer, moviegoing (as noun), movie-going (as adjective: the movie-going public)

    off-screen (as adjective), off screen (as adverb: the action taking place off screen…)

    on-screen (as adjective), on screen (as adverb: it is seen on screen when…)

    outtake

    re-cut

    soundtrack

    sound-off

    videomaker, videomaking

    voice-off

    voice-over

    8mm, 16mm, 35mm, etc., but Super-8


    Numbers

    Spell out whole numbers from one through one hundred, round numbers, and any number beginning a sentence. The same rules apply to ordinal numbers: second, fifty-fourth, thousandth; but 125th, 152nd.

    French Usage in English Texts

    Do not italicize French terms if they are familiar and in general use: recherché, oeuvre, montage, otherwise they should be italicized:  film noir, mise en scène, nouvelle vague.

    For titles of films, books, etc., the first article and following word are capitalized: La Moitié gauche du frigo, but Deux femmes en or; L’Âge du roman américain, but Histoire comparée du cinéma. Accents on capital letters are maintained: L’Écran français.

    Geography

    Spell city and country names in English (e.g., Montreal, Munich), unless it is important to use the original spelling (e.g. Montréal, München).

    Abbreviations

    Use two-letter (postal) abbreviations for provinces and states: ON (not Ont.), MA (not Mass.). Do not use periods: the UK and the USA.

    Punctuation

    For italicized titles, punctuation marks are placed outside the italics command, unless they are part of the title.

    Quotations are indicated by double inverted commas (“ ”); quotations within quotations are indicated by single inverted commas (‘ ’).

    Periods, commas, question marks and ellipses in quotations are placed inside the quotation marks.

    Use double inverted commas as an indication of qualification or doubtfulness: In this case, “truth” was a matter of opinion.

    Use single inverted commas only in a quotation: Jones writes, “In this case, ‘truth’ was a matter of opinion.”

    Ellipses are indicated by three periods (not by an automatic ellipsis command) with spaces between them or on either side of them. A fourth period is added if the ellipsis ends the sentence: “Painting was forced, as it turned out, to offer us illusion . . . . Photography and cinema . . . satisfy, once and for all and in its very essence, our obsession with realism.”

    No space is left between dashes and the preceding and following words:

    It was discussed—indeed, hotly debated—everywhere.

    Use only an apostrophe to form the possessive of singular and plural nouns ending in s (the actors’ expressions) and nouns that are plural in form but singular in meaning (politics’ appeal, economics’ influence). Use an apostrophe and s to form the possessive of names ending in s (Peter Morris’s book, Charles Dickens’s novel) and nouns ending with a double s (a lass’s charms, the mass’s demands).

    For emphasis, use italics; do not underline or use bold font.

    Use serial or Oxford comma.

    Dates

    The order of day, month, year should be consistent throughout the article: 20 June 1935.

    Months should be spelled out and years designated in full: 10 March 2002, (not 10-03-02).

    Decades may be indicated according to either of the following examples: the 1970s (without an apostrophe), the seventies.

    Reminder

    It is the author’s responsibility to proofread the text carefully, as well as to verify the accuracy of titles, quotations and references, including accent marks and other diacritical markings for material in languages other than English.

    Additional Elements for Submission

    Abstract and Keywords

    Your abstract must be approximately 100–150 words and written in the language of the paper. It should be a brief summary of the key points of the article.

    Following your abstract, include a 4–8 keywords, which will enhance discoverability through the CJFS / RCÉC, search engines, and databases.

    Author Biography

    Use a separate document for a short author’s bio of under 100 words and upload it separately to ScholarOne as “Supplementary – not for review”. Begin with your name in bold. For books, give date of publication only. This document will not be seen by reviewers.

    Letters of Permission

    Provide a copy of permission to use copyrighted material, if applicable. Permission can include a signed form, or a copy of an email or letter indicating permission from the copyright holder. Please note that failure to include letters of permission to use copyrighted material will, at the very least, delay the publication of the manuscript until the letters of permission have been received by the University of Toronto Press.

    Tables and Figures

    Tables and figures should be included within the text upon initial submission. Once accepted for publication please remove the figures from the text and indicate exactly where each table and figure belongs. Keep the tables in the main file, but place them at the end of the file. Use the phrase “Table/Figure 1 about here” in the approximate places where your table or figure should appear in the final copy.

    Tables

    Use the Tables function in Word (under the Insert tab in Office 2010, 2013) to create your tables; please do not use tabs or spaces to align columns. Do not use paragraph breaks; each item should be in its own cell. Avoid using vertical lines in tables. Horizontal lines are acceptable.

    The title should be typed above the top horizontal line (outside of any table cell). The source and any notes should appear below the bottom horizontal line.

    Figures

    The font used for figures that include text should be Helvetica or Arial.

    Provide a separate EPS, JPEG, TIF, or PDF file in colour or black and white, as appropriate, for each figure (colour images preferred if possible for the online publication). All figures must have a minimum resolution of 300 dpi (600 dots per inch is preferred), or be at least 25 inches wide at 72 dpi.

    If you choose to submit figures (line drawings) produced in Adobe Illustrator, please “outline” the type prior to making the EPS files. This eliminates problems with font incompatibilities. If you are using CorelDRAW to produce figures (line drawings), convert the type to curves before making the EPS files. Converting type to artwork eliminates incompatibility problems with fonts.

    Images

    Authors are responsible for:

    1. providing images,
    2. providing captions,
    3. identifying where in the article the images should appear, and
    4. acquiring necessary permission to use selected images.

    Image Quality

    Images should be the highest possible quality. Please remember that your computer screen is 72 dpi (dots per inch) while a printed journal like CJFS is a minimum of 300 dpi.  This means that an image that looks big on your screen will look 3 times smaller on the printed page.

    You can check the number of pixels in your image by right clicking on the image (in the Explorer window on a Windows PC or using the Finder on a Mac) and selecting Properties (on a Windows PC) or Get Info (on a Mac).

    The minimum we will accept is DVD frame grab quality: around 720 pixels (width) by 480 pixels (height) at 300 dpi.

    If you have an image with a minimum of 14 inches in width and 9 inches in height at 300 dpi, it is an excellent candidate for our cover.

    Excellent Sources for High Resolution Images (1000–3000 pixels in height)

    • Filmmakers, production companies, distribution companies, DVD production companies
    • Scans from Press Kits
    • Cinematheques
    • The BFI online image archive

    All articles must clearly distinguish between the use of production stills or other promotional artefacts and the use of frame enlargements or video grabs. Production stills should only be used to illustrate a point that is being made about promotion or some connected issue, and the text must not conflate such images with actual visual evidence from a film offered in support of an analysis of those visuals.

    Adequate Source for Images (480–1000 pixels in height)

    Frame grabs from DVDs

    Please Remember: Some screen capture programs make it easy to accidentally capture the onscreen DVD player and mouse cursor.  Please double check your frame grabs to make sure they are mouse free.

    Also Remember: Authors are responsible for obtaining permission from copyright holders of all images, including frame grabs. A permission form is available if you need to send it to the copyright holder.

    Inadequate Sources for Images (less than 480 pixels in height)

    IMDb, film websites, frame grabs from online video

    Naming your Image Files

    Please name the images according to this format: Manuscript#_your-last-name_FigureNUMBER_FilmName (e.g., CJFS-2016-0001_smith_figure1_ThinRedLine.tif)

    Image Placement

    If you wish to reference images and illustrations directly, please do so in the body of the text, and refer to them as “figures” as shown below:

    . . . and thus we can see quite clearly how the shadow in this scene foreshadows Citizen Kane’s eventual demise (Figure 1).

    Captions

    Please provide captions in the text for all tables and figures. Once the manuscript is accepted for publication you will be required to resubmit tables and figures as supplementary files with the appropriate captions on ScholarOne Manuscripts.

    [FIGURE 1 about here]

    [CJFS-2016-0001_smith_figure1_ThinRedLine.tif]

    Figure 1: An allegorical reference to Thomas Hobbes’ Leviathan.  Sgt. Welsh (Sean Penn, on left) and Pvt. Bell (Ben Chaplin, on right) examine a crocodile in Terrence Malick’s The Thin Red Line (1998).

    Notes: Extensive notes go here.

    Source: Courtesy of ABC Company.

    Copyright Agreement

    Upon manuscript acceptance all authors will be expected to sign a copyright agreement.

    Queries

    How to Alienate Your Editor: A Practical Guide for Established Authors, written by Stephen K. Donovan and published in the Journal of Scholarly Publishing, is an excellent article on classic mistakes made during the submission process. Also useful is “Surviving Referees’ Reports” written by Brian Martin and also published in Journal of Scholarly Publishing.

    Contact Information

    Questions relating to any of the above details may be directed to the CJFS / RCÉC Editors at the addresses below:

    Marc Furstenau (marc.furstenau@carleton.ca) and Jerry White (jerry.white@Dal.Ca)

  • Permission information

    For permissions inquiries, please contact:

    Canadian Journal of Film Studies Permissions
    University of Toronto Press
    5201 Dufferin Street
    Toronto, ON M3H 5T8
    Canada
    Tel: (416) 667–7777 ext: 7849
    Fax: (416) 667–7881
    E-mail: journal.permissions@utpress.utoronto.ca

  • Comité de rédaction

    Directeurs

    Marc Furstenau, Carleton University

    Jerry White, Dalhousie University

    Directeur adjoint

    Germain Lacasse, Université de Montréal

    Rédacteur adjoint

    David Richler, Carleton University

    Comité de rédaction

    Michael Baker, Chair, Sheridan College

    Christie Milliken, Brock University

    Louis Pelletier, Concordia University

    Diane Burgess, University of British Columbia

    Responsable des comptes rendus

    Liz Czach, University of Alberta

    Traduction des résumés

    Henri Biahé, Dalhousie University

    Jerry White, Dalhousie University

    RCÉC Website

    Konstantinos Koutras, Carleton University

    Soutien administratif

    Mary-Beth MacIsaac, Dalhousie University

    Comité consultatif

    Jane Gaines, Columbia University

    André Gaudreault, Université de Montréal

    Charlie Keil, University of Toronto

    Janine Marchessault, York University

    Bill Marshall, University of Stirling

    Toby Miller, University of California at Riverside

    Bill Nichols, San Francisco State University

    Patrice Petro, University of Wisconsin

    Dana Polan, New York University

    Philip Rosen, Brown University

    Geneviève Sellier, Université de Caen

    Janet Staiger, University of Texas at Austin

  • Résumés et indexation

    The Canadian Journal of Film Studies | Revue canadienne d’études cinématographiques is indexed by the Federation Internationale des Archives du Film (FIAF) and its published listing, the International Index to Film/Television Periodicals, Film Literature Index, Media Review Digest, and Post Script and online in Canadian Index, Canadian Business, International Filmarchives Database, Film Index International, MLA International Bibliog-raphy, Post Script, ProQuest, and JSTOR.
  • Pour les auteurs

    Sujet et portée

    Canadian Journal of Film Studies | Revue canadienne d’études cinématographiques (CJFS / RCÉC) est la principale revue universitaire canadienne d’études cinématographiques dont les articles sont soumis à l’évaluation des pairs. Elle est publiée deux fois l’an depuis son lancement, en 1990.

    CJFS / RCÉC est publiée avec l’appui de l’Association canadienne des études cinématographiques / Film Studies Association of Canada et du CRSH / SSHRC. La publication bénéficie également du soutien de la School for Studies in Art and Culture de la Carleton University et du Department of English de la Dalhousie University. CJFS / RCÉC est publiée par l’University of Toronto Press.

    Évaluation par les pairs

    La publication dans CJFS / RCÉC est régie par un système en ligne bilingue de l’évaluation par les pairs appelé ScholarOne Manuscripts, en vertu duquel les auteurs, les pairs évaluateurs et les critiques littéraires peuvent soumettre des articles, des évaluations et des comptes rendus en ligne. De la soumission initiale du manuscrit à son acceptation définitive, ScholarOne Manuscripts simplifie le processus de publication afin d’en assurer l’efficacité tout en facilitant la tâche des auteurs, des pairs évaluateurs ainsi que des rédacteurs. Lorsque votre article est prêt à être soumis, vous devez le présenter par l’intermédiaire de l’interface ScholarOne Manuscripts.

    Masquage

    Le processus de l’évaluation par les pairs de CJFS / RCÉC se déroule en double anonymat.

    Le masquage d’un manuscrit exige la suppression de toute allusion au nom des auteurs et à leurs publications, ainsi qu’au contexte de la recherche et à l’identité des participants, le cas échéant. Afin que l’anonymat soit assuré, le nom de l’auteur (de même que celui de tous les coauteurs) doit être remplacé dans le texte, les notes ou les renvois par le mot « auteur ».

    Le mot « auteur » est ensuite intégré aux références bibliographiques à la section « A » de la liste. Les références aux ouvrages de l’« auteur » ne doivent pas être insérées dans la bibliographie par ordre alphabétique du nom de famille de l’auteur. Pour masquer le contexte de la recherche, des pseudonymes doivent être utilisés en remplacement du nom des établissements ou des participants, et la ville ou la municipalité dans laquelle les travaux de recherche se sont déroulés ne doit pas être désignée si ce renseignement est susceptible de permettre aux lecteurs de reconnaître les participants ou les établissements en question. Par exemple, la mention « une université bilingue à Ottawa » n’est pas un masquage approprié, car il n’existe qu’une seule université répondant à cette description. Évitez de fournir toute autre précision qui pourrait mener à l’identification des personnes ou des établissements en cause.

    Vous devez également supprimer tout renseignement qui dévoilerait votre identité dans la section « propriétés » de votre fichier Word.

    Les manuscrits qui n’ont pas été masqués seront retournés aux auteurs afin qu’ils procèdent au masquage avant que les textes ne soient acheminés aux lecteurs critiques, ce qui retardera le processus de publication. Si un article est accepté pour publication, l’auteur doit rétablir dans le texte tous les renseignements personnels et les références pertinents.

    Processus de présentation des manuscrits

    Avant de soumettre votre article, vous devrez vous inscrire au moyen du système en ligne de l’évaluation par les pairs de CJFS / RCÉC au moyen de l’application ScholarOne Manuscripts. Vous soumettrez la version définitive de votre manuscrit sous forme de fichier numérique à l’aide de ScholarOne Manuscripts.

    Outre des articles savants sur le cinéma, la télévision et les autres médias d’images animées, CJFS / RCÉC publie des critiques d’ouvrages et des essais critiques. Les demandes de renseignements peuvent être adressées à cjfsedit@filmstudies.ca.

    CJFS / RCÉC compte aussi au nombre de ses rubriques occasionnelles « Ciné-Documents » (documents rares et documents d’archives pertinents à l’étude des images animées) et « Ciné-Forum » sous lesquelles paraissent de courts articles (d’un maximum de 4 000 mots) sur tout sujet d’intérêt pour les étudiants, les professeurs et les chercheurs en cinéma. Parmi les sujets qui peuvent y être traités figurent les débats sur les apports récents à la théorie, l’histoire, la critique et la pédagogie du cinéma ; les données relatives aux archives, aux collections spéciales et aux autres sources d’information pour la recherche ; les traductions ; les entrevues ; les analyses de récentes sorties DVD ou multimédias en continu ayant une importance particulière sur les plans archivistique, critique ou pédagogique en études cinématographiques. Tous les articles doivent être l’œuvre originale de l’auteur, ne pas avoir été publiés auparavant et ne pas être à l’étude en vue de leur publication dans une autre revue.

    Après avoir été soumis, votre article sera examiné par des pairs, des universitaires spécialisés dans le domaine. À la suite de cette évaluation, votre texte sera soit accepté en l’état, soit rejeté soit retourné pour révision. L’ensemble du processus peut exiger plusieurs semaines, voire plusieurs mois ; nous sollicitons votre patience.

    Lors de la soumission initiale, tous les éléments complémentaires — figures et illustrations, tableaux et images — doivent être intégrés au texte. Une fois le manuscrit accepté pour publication, ces éléments devront être extraits du texte et soumis sous forme de fichiers complémentaires distincts, assortis d’indications précises, à l’aide de ScholarOne Manuscripts ; ils devront être remplacés dans le texte par la notation « Tableau/Figure 1 à peu près ici », à l’endroit approximatif où vous souhaitez que le tableau ou la figure apparaisse dans le document définitif.

    Exigences relatives aux manuscrits

    Le document revu définitif doit être présenté sous forme numérique à simple interligne, de préférence dans une police de 12 points, et comporter une bibliographie exhaustive des sources citées. Le compte de mots ne devrait pas excéder 10 000 environ.

    Les titres et intertitres doivent respecter la forme suivante : titres de premier niveau en caractère gras ; titres de deuxième niveau en italique ; titres de troisième niveau en caractère romain. Au-delà du troisième niveau, optez pour une forme appropriée.

    Sauf dans les cas les plus évidents (soit les références bibliques), les abréviations devraient être évitées. Dans le cas des abréviations d’ouvrages bibliques, consultez la liste exhaustive établie par le Journal of Biblical Studies. Veuillez vous abstenir d’improviser en matière de présentation.

    Le point, le deux-points, le point-virgule et la virgule ne doivent être suivis que d’une seule espace. Utilisez le tiret demi-cadratin dans les intervalles de dates et de pages et le tiret cadratin (précédé et suivi d’une espace) pour isoler une portion de texte. Reportez-vous au la France. Je suggérerais, plus près de nous, Le Ramat de la typographie (onzième édition) pour plus de détails quant aux règles typographiques.

    Évitez de procéder à la mise en pages du document. Le texte doit être justifié à gauche et composé en drapeau à droite ; abstenez-vous de justifier à droite (composition au carré) ou de centrer le texte.

    Utilisez le retour à la ligne forcé uniquement à la fin des paragraphes. Laissez votre logiciel se charger des sauts de ligne (retour automatique à la ligne) et n’ajoutez pas d’interlignes supplémentaires entre les paragraphes.

    Abstenez-vous d’insérer des titres courants en haut ou en bas de page (bien que la pagination soit acceptable).

    Utilisez la fonction de numérotation des lignes de Microsoft Word (sous l’onglet Mise en page d’Office 2010, 2013), de sorte que les lecteurs critiques puissent facilement se reporter à votre texte.

    Comptes rendus

    Si vous présentez un compte rendu, limitez-en le compte de mots à environ 1 800. Le compte rendu devrait respecter les règles suivantes :

    Titre de l’ouvrage

    Nom et prénom de l’auteur (ou « Sous la direction de » le nom du rédacteur)

    Lieu de publication suivi d’une espace insécable avant le deux-points, maison d’édition suivie d’une virgule, année de publication suivie d’une virgule, nombre de pages en chiffres romains + en chiffres arabes (incluant les illustrations, les notes, les tableaux, la bibliographie et l’index)

    COMPTE RENDU DU NOM ET PRÉNOM DE COMPTE RENDU DES LIVRES, Affiliation

    Exemple :

    Tourner le dos : sur l’envers du personnage au cinéma

     

    Sous la direction de Benjamin Thomas

    Saint-Denis : Presses Universitaires de Vincennes, 2013, 186 pp.

     

    Compte rendu de Stéphanie Croteau, Université de Montréal / Université Sorbonne Nouvelle – Paris 3

    Citations et documentation

    Toutes les sources consultées doivent être présentées conformément aux règles du Ramat de la typographie. (Voir les exemples qui suivent.)

    Les notes doivent figurer en fin d’ouvrage, et non en bas de page ; utilisez la fonction automatisée de Word grâce à laquelle les indices qui renvoient aux notes en fin d’ouvrage seront intégrés au corps du texte. Vous pourrez ainsi insérer vos notes à la fin de votre texte, dans la section que vous aurez pris soin d’intituler NOTES. Suivez les directives applicables aux notes en fin d’ouvrage que vous trouverez dans Le Ramat de la typographie (onzième édition).

    Dans les références à un ouvrage précédemment cité, il suffit d’indiquer le nom de famille de l’auteur et la ou les pages concernées. Ne mentionnez le titre de l’ouvrage que si un même auteur est cité pour plus d’un ouvrage dans les notes. N’utilisez pas le vocable « op. cit. ». Utilisez les citations abrégées plutôt que l’indication « ibid. ».

    Dans le cas d’articles de périodiques, indiquez le nom du ou des auteurs, le titre de l’article, le nom du périodique, les numéros de volume et d’édition, l’année de publication et la ou les pages concernées :

    Ghislain Thibault, « Filming Simondon: The National Film Board, Education, and Humanism », Revue canadienne d’études cinématographiques, vol. 26, no 1, 2017, p. 1-24.

    Dans le cas d’articles d’une anthologie, privilégiez la présentation suivante :

    Inka Mülder-Bach, « Réflexions sur la phénoménologie de la surface de Siegfried Kracauer », dans Weimar : le Tournant esthétique, sous la direction de Gérard Raulet et Josef Fürnkäs, Paris, Anthropos, 1989, p. 273-286.

    Dans le cas d’articles de publications mensuelles, bimensuelles ou hebdomadaires, indiquez le mois ou le mois et le jour, ainsi que l’année et la ou les pages concernées ; la mention des numéros de volume et d’édition est facultative :

    Ed Buscombe, « Man to Man », Sight and Sound, janvier 2006, p. 34.

    ou encore :

    Ed Buscombe, « Man to Man », Sight and Sound, vol. 16, no 1, janvier 2006, p. 34.

    Dans le cas d’articles de journal, indiquer la page :

    Éditorial, Philadelphia Inquirer, 30 juillet 1990, p. 2.

    Inscrivez le titre complet des périodiques, sans abréviations.

    Les titres de journaux, de livres et de périodiques doivent être inscrits en italique et non pas soulignés.

    Dans le cas de réimpressions et de traductions de livres, indiquez la date de publication initiale :

    Jacques Barzun, Simple and Direct: A Rhetoric for Writers, éd. rev. (1985 ; réimpr.), Chicago, University of Chicago Press, 1994, p. 152-153.

    • À noter : Il s’agit dans l’exemple qui précède d’une édition révisée ; si toutefois l’édition est numérotée, il convient d’utiliser plutôt ledit numéro (p. ex., 3eéd.).

    Pierre Bourdieu, Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgment of Taste (1979), trad. par Richard Nice, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University Press, 1984, p. 63.

    Si la référence comporte un numéro DOI, ce dernier doit être utilisé en remplacement de l’adresse URL.

    Références à des films, des émissions de télévision, des vidéos ou des DVD

    Les titres de films, de vidéos et de DVD doivent être composés en italique et identifiés (entre parenthèses) au moyen du nom du ou des réalisateurs et de l’année de sortie : Exotica (Atom Egoyan, 1994).

    Les titres de séries télévisées doivent être composés en italique : Unité 9.

    Les épisodes particuliers d’une série doivent être cités entre guillemets : « Épisode 1 ». Les renseignements supplémentaires relatifs au réalisateur, au producteur et à la date doivent être mentionnés uniquement lorsque les circonstances l’exigent.

    Dans le cas d’éditions spéciales de DVD, indiquez la date de sortie entre parenthèses et mentionnez les renseignements supplémentaires relatifs à l’édition dans une note en fin d’ouvrage.

    Références aux sources électroniques

    Les références aux articles de périodiques en ligne doivent comporter le nom de l’auteur ou des auteurs, le titre de l’article, le nom du périodique en italique, les numéros de volume et d’édition, ainsi que la date de publication, l’adresse URL et la date de consultation :

    Alain Kerzoncuf and Nándor Boker, « Alfred Hitchcock’s Trailers », Senses of Cinema, http://www.sensesofcinema.com/contents/05/35/hitchcocks_trailers.html (consulté le 6 novembre 2005).

    Les références aux sites Web doivent contenir un maximum de renseignements, notamment le nom de l’auteur du contenu, le titre de la page, le nom du propriétaire du site, l’adresse URL et la date de consultation :

    Fred Camper, « My Favorite Films », le site de Fred Camper, http://www.fredcamper.com/ Film/Filmmakers.html (consulté le 5 novembre 2004).

    Les contributions aux groupes de courrier électronique (listes de diffusion) doivent être identifiées au moyen du nom de l’auteur, du sujet, du nom du groupe ou de la liste de diffusion, l’adresse électronique et la date du message :

    Konrad, « Poets do Film: SF Cinematheque Screening », Experimental Film Discussion List <frameworks@listserv.aol.com>, le 28 novembre 2004.

    Les recommandations suivantes portent sur des questions de style précises qui se posent fréquemment. Pour d’autres recommandations en matière de style, reportez vous au Ramat de la typographie (onzième édition).

    Césure et orthographe

    Césure : appliquez les règles de césure du dictionnaire, si le mot y apparaît ; dans le cas contraire, respectez les règles de césure syllabique, à moins qu’il ne s’agisse d’un terme technique indivisible.

    Le dictionnaire orthographique de référence est GDT (Le grand dictionnaire terminologique).

     

    Nombres

    Composez en toutes lettres les chiffres de zéro à neuf, les nombres arrondis et les nombres en début de phrase. Les mêmes règles s’appliquent aux nombres ordinaux : deuxième, cinquantième, millième mais 125e, 152e.

    Utilisation de mots étrangers dans les textes français

    Composez les mots étrangers en italique — crescendo, fair-play, grosso modo —, à moins qu’ils ne soient passés dans la langue courante — best-seller, bluff, challenge, diva, imprimatur.

    Géographie

    Les noms des villes et des pays doivent être composés en français (p. ex., Montréal, Munich), à moins que le contexte ne justifie l’utilisation de l’orthographe d’origine (München).

    Abréviations

    Utilisez le code international ISO de deux lettres pour désigner les provinces et les États : ON (et non Ont.), MA (et non Mass.). N’utilisez pas de point dans ces abréviations : GB et US.

    Ponctuation

    Dans le cas des titres en italique, seuls les signes de ponctuation appartenant au titre doivent être composés en italique.

    Le deux-points, le point-virgule, le point d’exclamation et le point d’interrogation doivent être précédés d’une espace insécable. Une espace insécable doit suivre le guillemet français ouvrant et précéder le guillemet français fermant.

    Les citations de premier rang doivent être encadrées par des guillemets français (« »), les citations de deuxième rang, par des guillemets anglais (“ ”) et les citations de troisième rang, par des guillemets allemands ou simples (‘ ’).

    La ponctuation ne doit être à l’intérieur des guillemets que si elle fait partie de la citation.

    Utilisez les guillemets pour mettre en valeur ou en doute un mot ou un groupe de mots :

    Exemples :

    • La situation nous a poussés à nous interroger sur la « véracité » de cette affirmation.
    • « La situation, dit-il, nous a poussés à nous interroger sur la “véracité” de cette affirmation. »
    • « Voici comment le journaliste a rapporté ses paroles : “La situation nous a poussés à nous interroger sur la ‘véracité’ de cette affirmation”. »

    Les points de suspension, en plus d’exprimer une idée ou une énumération inachevée, signalent la suppression d’un passage dans un texte cité lorsqu’ils sont placés entre crochets. Si le passage omis se situe à la fin de la citation, le point final peut être supprimé : « Nous invitons les membres du conseil à s’exprimer sur cette question délicate […] »

    Les tirets sont précédés et suivis d’un espacement :

    Exemple :

    • La décision a soulevé une vive opposition – si ce n’est un tollé – chez les participants.

    Les symboles de pourcentage et de dollar doivent être précédés d’une espace insécable.

    La numérotation des notes doit être placée immédiatement après le mot, avant la ponctuation.

    Pour accentuer un mot ou un passage, utilisez l’italique et non le soulignement ou le gras.

    Dates

    L’ordre jour, mois, année doit être respecté uniformément dans l’expression des dates : 20 juin 1935.

    Les mois doivent être composés en toutes lettres et les années, indiquées en entier (10 mars 2002 (et non 10-03-02).

    Les décennies peuvent être indiquées selon l’un des deux modes suivants : les années 1970 ou les années soixante-dix.

    Rappel

    Il appartient aux auteurs de relire attentivement leur texte et de vérifier l’exactitude des titres, des citations et des références qu’il contient, y compris les accents et autres signes diacritiques des éléments du texte appartenant à une autre langue que le français.

    Éléments supplémentaires relatifs à la présentation

    Résumé et mots clés

    Votre résumé doit contenir approximativement 100 à 150 mots et être rédigé dans la langue du document. Il doit donner un bref aperçu des principaux éléments de l’article.

    À la suite de ce résumé, proposez 4 à 8 mots clés qui faciliteront le repérage au moyen des moteurs de recherche et des bases de données de CJFS / RCÉC.

    Biographie des auteurs

    Utilisez un document distinct pour présenter une courte biographie de l’auteur (moins de 100 mots) et téléchargez le document séparément à titre de complément ne nécessitant pas de révision (« Fichier supplémentaire non pour examen ») par l’intermédiaire de ScholarOne. Inscrivez en en-tête le nom de l’auteur en caractère gras. Dans le cas de livres, indiquez la date de publication seulement. Ce document ne sera pas transmis aux lecteurs critiques.

    Lettres d’autorisation

    Fournissez une copie des lettres vous autorisant à utiliser les documents assujettis à des droits d’auteur, le cas échéant. L’autorisation peut revêtir la forme d’un formulaire signé ou d’une copie d’un message courriel ou d’une lettre attestant que l’autorisation d’utiliser le document vous est accordée par le détenteur des droits. Veuillez noter que l’absence d’une lettre autorisant l’utilisation du document assujetti à des droits d’auteur aura à tout le moins pour conséquence de retarder la publication du manuscrit jusqu’à ce que l’University of Toronto Press reçoive ladite lettre.

    Tableaux et figures

    Les tableaux et figures doivent être insérés dans le texte lors de la soumission initiale. Une fois le texte accepté pour publication, vous devrez en retirer les figures et tableaux et indiquer avec précision à quel endroit chacun d’eux doit apparaître dans le texte. Conservez les tableaux et figures dans le fichier principal, mais placez-les à la fin du fichier. Utilisez l’indication « Tableau/Figure 1 à peu près ici » à l’endroit approximatif où votre tableau ou votre figure doit apparaître dans le document définitif.

    Tableaux

    Utilisez la fonction Tableaux dans Word (sous l’onglet Insertion dans Office 2010, 2013) afin de créer vos tableaux ; veillez à ne pas utiliser les tabulateurs ou les espacements pour aligner les colonnes. N’utilisez pas les alinéas ; chaque élément du contenu doit avoir sa propre cellule. Évitez d’utiliser les lignes verticales dans les tableaux. Les lignes horizontales sont acceptables.

    Le titre doit être inscrit au-dessus de la ligne horizontale supérieure (à l’extérieur des cellules du tableau). La source et les notes, le cas échéant, doivent apparaître au-dessous de la ligne horizontale inférieure du tableau.

    Figures

    Les polices de caractère Helvetica ou Arial doivent être utilisées dans les figures contenant du texte.

    Fournissez un fichier distinct EPS, JPEG, TIF ou PDF, couleur ou noir et blanc selon les besoins, pour chaque figure (les images couleur sont préférables, dans la mesure du possible, pour la publication en ligne). Toutes les figures doivent avoir une résolution d’au moins 300 points par pouce ou ppp (de préférence 600 ppp) ou avoir une largeur d’au moins 25 pouces en résolution de 72 ppp.

    Si vous choisissez de soumettre des figures (dessins au trait) produites dans Adobe Illustrator, veuillez en préciser le caractère avant de constituer les fichiers EPS. Cette précaution permettra d’éviter les problèmes d’incompatibilité de polices. Si vous utilisez CoreIDRAW pour produire les figures (dessins au trait), convertissez les caractères en courbes avant de constituer les fichiers EPS. La conversion des caractères en images éliminera les problèmes d’incompatibilité des polices.

    Images

    Les responsabilités suivantes incombent aux auteurs :

    1. fourniture des images,
    2. fourniture des légendes,
    3. indication de l’endroit où les images doivent être insérées dans l’article et
    4. obtention des autorisations nécessaires pour utiliser les images choisies.
    Qualité des images

    La qualité des images doit être la meilleure possible. Rappelez-vous que la résolution des images à l’écran de votre ordinateur est de 72 ppp, alors que celle d’un imprimé comme RCÉC est au minimum de 300 ppp, ce qui fait qu’une image de grande dimension à votre écran sera trois fois plus petite sur une page imprimée.

    Vous pouvez vérifier le nombre de pixels de votre image en cliquant à la droite de l’image (dans la fenêtre Explorer d’un PC Windows ou en utilisant le Finder d’un Mac) et en choisissant Propriétés (sur un PC Windows) ou Information (sur un Mac).

    Le minimum acceptable dans le cas de la saisie d’images vidéo est d’environ 720 pixels (largeur) sur 480 pixels (hauteur), à 300 ppp.

    Si vous proposez une image d’un minimum de 14 pouces de largeur et de 9 pouces de hauteur d’une résolution de 300 ppp, elle fera un excellent choix pour notre couverture.

    Excellentes sources d’images de haute résolution (1000 à 3000 pixels de hauteur)
    • Sociétés cinématographiques, sociétés de production, sociétés de distribution, sociétés de production de DVD
    • Reproductions par numérisation de documents de dossier de presse
    • Cinémathèques
    • Banque d’images en ligne BFI

    Dans tous les articles, la distinction doit être clairement faite entre l’utilisation de photographies de plateau ou autres documents promotionnels et celle d’agrandissements d’images ou de saisies d’images vidéo. Les photographies de plateau ne doivent être utilisées que pour illustrer un propos tenu au sujet d’une promotion ou d’un élément connexe quelconque, et le texte ne doit pas associer ces images à une donnée visuelle réelle tirée d’un film, présentée à l’appui d’une analyse de ces éléments visuels.

    Sources d’images adéquates (480 à 1000 pixels de hauteur)

    Captures d’images de DVD

    Rappelez-vous : Avec certains programmes de capture d’écran, il est facile de capturer accidentellement le lecteur DVD et le curseur de la souris apparaissant à l’écran. Vérifiez bien vos captures d’écran afin de vous assurer qu’elles sont libres de ces encombrements.

    Rappelez-vous également : La responsabilité d’obtenir l’autorisation d’utiliser des images auprès des détenteurs des droits, y compris les captures d’images, incombe aux auteurs. Un formulaire de demande d’autorisation est à votre disposition si vous devez faire parvenir cette demande à un détenteur de droits.

    Sources d’images inadéquates (moins de 480 pixels de hauteur)

    IMDb, sites de films, captures d’images de vidéos en ligne.

    Attribution d’un nom aux fichiers d’images

    Veuillez attribuer un nom aux images selon les modalités suivantes : N˚Manuscrit_votre-nom-de-famille_N˚figure_Titrefilm (p. ex., RCÉC-2016-0001_tremblay_figure1_Lalignerouge.tif)

    Emplacement de l’image

    Si vous souhaitez renvoyer les lecteurs aux images et aux illustrations directement, veuillez le faire dans le corps du texte en mentionnant qu’il s’agit de « figures », comme dans l’exemple qui suit :

    … et nous pouvons donc constater comment l’ombre dans cette scène laisse deviner la disparition éventuelle du personnage (voir la figure 1).

    Légendes

    Veuillez insérer dans le texte des légendes pour tous les tableaux et figures. Une fois le manuscrit accepté pour publication, vous devrez présenter de nouveau les tableaux et figures dans des fichiers complémentaires, accompagnés des légendes appropriées, par l’intermédiaire de ScholarOne Manuscripts.

    [FIGURE 1 à peu près ici]

    [CJFS-2016-0001_smith_figure1_ThinRedLine.tif]

    Figure 1 : Gilles Groulx, Carol Faucher, Jean Chabot et Maurice Bulbulian (1976).

    Notes : Insérer les notes détaillées.

    Source : Avec l’aimable autorisation de la Société ABC.

    Contrat d’exploitation de droits d’auteur

    Une fois leur manuscrit accepté pour publication, tous les auteurs doivent signer un contrat d’exploitation de droits d’auteur.

    Renseignements complémentaires

    Publier dans une revue savante — Les 10 règles du chercheur convaincant, deuxième édition, de Pierre Cossette, paru par les Presses de l’Université du Québec en 2016, est un excellent livre sur les erreurs fréquemment commises dans le cadre du processus de soumission. Cet article par le même auteur est également utile.

    Coordonnées

    Les questions relatives à l’un des sujets traités dans le présent document peuvent être adressées aux rédacteurs de CJFS / RCÉC :
     

    Marc Furstenau (marc.furstenau@carleton.ca) et Jerry White (jerry.white@Dal.Ca)