Capitalizing Knowledge: Essays on the History of Business Education in Canada

By Barbara Austin

© 2000

Interpreting the path of the future is made easier by understanding the past. In light of this adage, Capitalizing Knowledge examines the history of Canadian business faculties in their search for professional legitimacy. As the title suggests, this volume is an overview of the development of business schools in Canadian universities. Business faculties have different characteristics; some are noted for generating management research, while others generate interaction with the business community. Some programs are famous for their MBA graduates, others for their undergraduate students. This collection of essays describes the critical events that have defined the character of these faculties and societies of business education in Canada over the course of the twentieth century. Eight universities are profiled, including Queen's, York, and the University of Toronto. In addition, the development of the Administrative Sciences Association of Canada (ASAC) is traced.

The first book of its kind, Capitalizing Knowledge contains original research by some of the leading Canadian business school academics, who describe how these programs have evolved. The contributors all note the particular importance of organization culture and values in moulding the actions of faculty members. They also highlight the difficulties associated with establishing a body of knowledge in business management and transforming that knowledge to suit ever-changing business organizations and industry at large.

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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 386 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.4in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP000961

  • PUBLISHED JUL 2000

    From: $39.75

    Regular Price: $53.00

    ISBN 9781442638860
  • PUBLISHED JUL 2000

    From: $63.00

    Regular Price: $84.00

    ISBN 9780802042347
  • PUBLISHED JUL 2000

    From: $39.75

    Regular Price: $53.00

Quick Overview

The history of eight Canadian business faculties are examined through a series of essays in their search for professional legitimacy.

Capitalizing Knowledge: Essays on the History of Business Education in Canada

By Barbara Austin

© 2000

Interpreting the path of the future is made easier by understanding the past. In light of this adage, Capitalizing Knowledge examines the history of Canadian business faculties in their search for professional legitimacy. As the title suggests, this volume is an overview of the development of business schools in Canadian universities. Business faculties have different characteristics; some are noted for generating management research, while others generate interaction with the business community. Some programs are famous for their MBA graduates, others for their undergraduate students. This collection of essays describes the critical events that have defined the character of these faculties and societies of business education in Canada over the course of the twentieth century. Eight universities are profiled, including Queen's, York, and the University of Toronto. In addition, the development of the Administrative Sciences Association of Canada (ASAC) is traced.

The first book of its kind, Capitalizing Knowledge contains original research by some of the leading Canadian business school academics, who describe how these programs have evolved. The contributors all note the particular importance of organization culture and values in moulding the actions of faculty members. They also highlight the difficulties associated with establishing a body of knowledge in business management and transforming that knowledge to suit ever-changing business organizations and industry at large.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 386 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.4in x 9.3in
  • Author Information

    Barbara Austin is a professor at Brock University. She has taught university management courses for twenty years.