Celebrity, Fame, and Infamy in the Hellenistic World

Edited by Riemer A. Faber

© 2020

Modern notions of celebrity, fame, and infamy reach back to the time of Homer's Iliad. During the Hellenistic period, in particular, the Greek understanding of fame became more widely known, and adapted, to accommodate or respond to non-Greek understandings of reputation in society and culture.

This collection of essays illustrates the ways in which the characteristics of fame and infamy in the Hellenistic era distinguished themselves and how they were represented in diverse and unique ways throughout the Mediterranean. The means of recording fame and infamy included public art, literature, sculpture, coinage, and inscribed monuments. The ruling elite carefully employed these means throughout the different Hellenistic kingdoms, and these essays demonstrate how they operated in the creation of social, political, and cultural values. The authors examine the cultural means whereby fame and infamy entered social consciousness, and explore the nature and effect of this important and enduring sociological phenomenon.

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Product Details

  • Series: Phoenix Supplementary Volumes
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 288 pages
  • Illustrations: 41
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP005503

  • AVAILABLE FEB 2020

    From: $63.75

    Regular Price: $85.00

    ISBN 9781487505226
  • AVAILABLE FEB 2020

    From: $63.75

    Regular Price: $85.00

Quick Overview

This book traces the roots of modern notions of celebrity, fame, and infamy back to the Hellenistic period of classical antiquity, when sensational personages like Cleopatra of Egypt and Alexander the Great became famous world-wide.

Celebrity, Fame, and Infamy in the Hellenistic World

Edited by Riemer A. Faber

© 2020

Modern notions of celebrity, fame, and infamy reach back to the time of Homer's Iliad. During the Hellenistic period, in particular, the Greek understanding of fame became more widely known, and adapted, to accommodate or respond to non-Greek understandings of reputation in society and culture.

This collection of essays illustrates the ways in which the characteristics of fame and infamy in the Hellenistic era distinguished themselves and how they were represented in diverse and unique ways throughout the Mediterranean. The means of recording fame and infamy included public art, literature, sculpture, coinage, and inscribed monuments. The ruling elite carefully employed these means throughout the different Hellenistic kingdoms, and these essays demonstrate how they operated in the creation of social, political, and cultural values. The authors examine the cultural means whereby fame and infamy entered social consciousness, and explore the nature and effect of this important and enduring sociological phenomenon.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Phoenix Supplementary Volumes
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 288 pages
  • Illustrations: 41
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Riemer A. Faber is a professor in the Department of Classical Studies at the University of Waterloo.
  • Table of contents

    List of Illustrations
    Abbreviations

    Introduction: Distinctives of Hellenistic Celebrity, Fame, and Infamy
    Riemer A. Faber

    1. Fama and Infamia: The Tale of Grypos and Tryphaina
    Sheila L. Ager

    2. Models of Virtue, Models of Poetry: The Quest for “Everlasting Fame” in Hellenistic Military Epitaphs
    Silvia Barbantani

    3. Can Powerful Women be Popular? Amastris: Shaping a Persian Wife into a Famous Hellenistic Queen
    Monica D’Agostini

    4. Remelted or Overstruck: Cases of Monetary Damnatio Memoriae in Hellenistic Times
    François de Callataÿ

    5. Ptolemaic Officials and Officers in Search of Fame
    Christelle Fischer-Bovet

    6. Lemnian Infamy and Masculine Glory in Apollonios’ Argonautica
    Judith Fletcher

    7. The “Good” Poros and the “Bad” Poros: Infamy and Honour in Alexander Historiography
    Timothy Howe

    8. Writing Monarchs of the Hellenistic Age: Renown, Fame, and Infamy
    Jacqueline Klooster

    9. Creating Alexander: The “Official” History of Kallisthenes of Olynthos
    Waldemar Heckel

    List of References
    List of Contributors

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