Class and Race Formation in North America

By James W. Russell

© 2008

On August 13, 1521, the largest and most developed of North America's societies, the Aztec empire, fell to Spanish invaders who, along with later European colonizers, built new societies in which they occupied the dominant class positions and forced Indians, imported African slaves, and Asians into subordinate positions. As a result of the conquest, race has become an enduring issue in the class structuring of North American societies.

Originally published as After the Fifth Sun: Class and Race in North America, this new, significantly expanded edition offers a comparative exploration of how patterns of class and racial inequality developed in the United States, Mexico, and Canada from colonial pasts to the beginning of the North American Free Trade Agreement and the post-NAFTA environment. What Russell reveals is a continent of diverse historical experiences, class systems, and ways of thinking about race.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 208 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.5in x 9.0in
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SKU# HE000063

  • PUBLISHED NOV 2008

    From: $30.56

    Regular Price: $35.95

    ISBN 9780802096784
  • PUBLISHED NOV 2008
    From: $28.95

Quick Overview

"Russell's meticulously researched and highly detailed book presents a critically important people's history of North America. It provides rich insights and demonstrates the potential of comparative research to broaden our perspective." - Dan Zuberi, University of British Columbia

Class and Race Formation in North America

By James W. Russell

© 2008

On August 13, 1521, the largest and most developed of North America's societies, the Aztec empire, fell to Spanish invaders who, along with later European colonizers, built new societies in which they occupied the dominant class positions and forced Indians, imported African slaves, and Asians into subordinate positions. As a result of the conquest, race has become an enduring issue in the class structuring of North American societies.

Originally published as After the Fifth Sun: Class and Race in North America, this new, significantly expanded edition offers a comparative exploration of how patterns of class and racial inequality developed in the United States, Mexico, and Canada from colonial pasts to the beginning of the North American Free Trade Agreement and the post-NAFTA environment. What Russell reveals is a continent of diverse historical experiences, class systems, and ways of thinking about race.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 208 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.5in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    Russell's meticulously researched and highly detailed book presents a critically important people's history of North America. For those interested in how class and race emerged and diverged among the three countries sharing this continent, this book provides rich insights and demonstrates the potential of comparative research to broaden our perspective.


    Dan Zuberi, University of British Columbia, author of Differences That Matter: Social Policy and the Working Poor in the United States and Canada

    ...a very important contribution to comparative studies of race and class.


    Richard Griswold del Castillo, Professor of Chicana and Chicano Studies, San Diego University

    This comprehensive analysis of North American societies should be read by anyone interested in making sense of current social issues. It illustrates, through an examination of class and race, that today's conditions are the result of choices made over the last 500 years and that building better social structures in each country remains a choice today and in the future.


    Carlos Salas, El Colegio de Tlaxcala
  • Author Information

    James W. Russell is University Professor of Sociology and directs the Latin American Studies Program at Eastern Connecticut State University. He was formerly Fulbright Research Professor at the North America Research Center of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México in Mexico City. He is the author of six books, including Double Standard: Social Policy in Europe and the United States (2006: Rowman and Littlefield) and Societies and Social Life: An Introduction to Sociology (2009: Sloan Publishing).

  • Table of contents

    Maps

    Preface

    1. Introduction
    2. Origins of Inequality and Uneven Development
    3. A New Empire
    4. Immigration
    5. Race Mixture
    6. Accumulation of Capital and Dependent Development
    7. NAFTA
    8. Comparative Economic and Social Classes
    9. Racial Contours of North America
    10. A North American Social Model?

    Notes

    Bibliography

    Index

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