Combating Poverty: Quebec's Pursuit of a Distinctive Welfare State

By Axel van den Berg, Charles Plante, Hicham Raïq, Christine Proulx, and Sam Faustmann

© 2017

Combating Poverty critically analyses the growing divergence between Quebec and other large Canadian provinces in terms of social and labour market policies and their outcomes over the past several decades. While Canada is routinely classified as a single, homogeneous ‘liberal market’ regime, social and labour market policy falls within provincial jurisdiction resulting in a considerable divergence in policy mixes and outcomes between provinces.

This volume offers a detailed survey of social and labour market policies since the early 2000s in Canada’s four largest provinces – Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, and Alberta – showing the full extent to which Canada’s major provinces have chosen diverging policy paths. Quebec has succeeded in emulating European and even Nordic social democratic levels of poverty for some groups, while poverty rates and patterns in the other provinces remain close to the high levels characteristic of the North American liberal, market-oriented regime. Combating Poverty provides a unique and timely reflection on the political implications and sustainability of Canada’s fragmented welfare state.

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Product Details

  • Series: Studies in Comparative Political Economy and Public Policy
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 232 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 38.0in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP004650

  • PUBLISHED AUG 2017

    From: $37.50

    Regular Price: $50.00

    ISBN 9781487501563
  • PUBLISHED AUG 2017

    From: $37.50

    Regular Price: $50.00

Quick Overview

Combating Poverty critically analyses the growing divergence between Quebec and other large Canadian provinces in terms of social and labour market policies and their outcomes over the past several decades.

Combating Poverty: Quebec's Pursuit of a Distinctive Welfare State

By Axel van den Berg, Charles Plante, Hicham Raïq, Christine Proulx, and Sam Faustmann

© 2017

Combating Poverty critically analyses the growing divergence between Quebec and other large Canadian provinces in terms of social and labour market policies and their outcomes over the past several decades. While Canada is routinely classified as a single, homogeneous ‘liberal market’ regime, social and labour market policy falls within provincial jurisdiction resulting in a considerable divergence in policy mixes and outcomes between provinces.

This volume offers a detailed survey of social and labour market policies since the early 2000s in Canada’s four largest provinces – Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia, and Alberta – showing the full extent to which Canada’s major provinces have chosen diverging policy paths. Quebec has succeeded in emulating European and even Nordic social democratic levels of poverty for some groups, while poverty rates and patterns in the other provinces remain close to the high levels characteristic of the North American liberal, market-oriented regime. Combating Poverty provides a unique and timely reflection on the political implications and sustainability of Canada’s fragmented welfare state.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Studies in Comparative Political Economy and Public Policy
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 232 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 38.0in x 9.3in
  • Reviews

    "Combating Poverty is a landmark contribution to our understanding of the development of social policy in Canada since the end of the 1980s. Few Canadians are aware of the strikingly divergent paths followed by Quebec and the rest of Canada since then. Combating Poverty tells the story in convincing fashion. A must read for educators, students, researchers, and policy makers who want to make a difference."


    John Myles, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Sociology and Senior Fellow in the School of Public Policy and Governance at the University of Toronto
  • Author Information

    Axel van den Berg is a professor in the Department of Sociology at McGill University.


    Charles Plante is a PhD candidate in the Department of Sociology at McGill University.


    Hicham Raïq is a Postdoctoral Researcher in the Department of Sociology at McGill University.


    Christine Proulx is a research professional at the Fédération québécoise des professeures et professeurs d'université (FQPPU).


    Samuel Faustmann is a data administrator at Real Food for Real Kids in Toronto.
  • Table of contents

    List of Figures
    List of Tables
    Acknowledgements

    Introduction: Quebec’s Exceptionalism in Context

    Chapter 1: Social and Employment Policies at the Provincial Level: A Survey of Four Provinces

    Chapter 2: Poverty: Measures and Trends

    Chapter 3: Poverty and the Changing Family

    Chapter 4: Chronic Poverty

    Chapter 5: Activation and Poverty

    Chapter 6: How Exceptional Is Quebec

    Conclusion: Towards the Provincialization of the Social Union? 

    Works Cited

    Notes