Culturing Bioscience: A Case Study in the Anthropology of Science

By Udo Krautwurst

© 2014

Charting the rise and fall of an experimental biomedical facility at a North American university, Culturing Bioscience offers a fascinating glimpse into scientific culture and the social and political context in which that culture operates. Krautwurst nests the discussion of scientific culture within a series of levels from the lab to the global political economy. In the process he explores a number of topics, including: the social impact of technology; researchers' relationships with sophisticated equipment; what scientists actually do in a laboratory; what role science plays in the contemporary university; and the way bioscience interacts with local, regional, and global governments. The result is a rich case study that illustrates a host of contemporary issues in the social study of science.

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Product Details

  • Series: Teaching Culture: UTP Ethnographies for the Classroom
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 224 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.1in x 0.6in x 9.0in
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  • PUBLISHED AUG 2014
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Charting the rise and fall of an experimental biomedical facility at a North American university, Culturing Bioscience offers a fascinating glimpse into scientific culture and the social and political context in which that culture operates.

Culturing Bioscience: A Case Study in the Anthropology of Science

By Udo Krautwurst

© 2014

Charting the rise and fall of an experimental biomedical facility at a North American university, Culturing Bioscience offers a fascinating glimpse into scientific culture and the social and political context in which that culture operates. Krautwurst nests the discussion of scientific culture within a series of levels from the lab to the global political economy. In the process he explores a number of topics, including: the social impact of technology; researchers' relationships with sophisticated equipment; what scientists actually do in a laboratory; what role science plays in the contemporary university; and the way bioscience interacts with local, regional, and global governments. The result is a rich case study that illustrates a host of contemporary issues in the social study of science.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Teaching Culture: UTP Ethnographies for the Classroom
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 224 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.1in x 0.6in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    Culturing Bioscience draws readers into thinking about how science is practiced, organized, and invested in by different kinds of actors, and introduces a wealth of concepts and authors (from Evelyn Fox Keller, Sharon Traweek, and Annemarie Mol to Hannah Landecker), all framed by Karen Barad's conception of agential realism. The text moves from analyzing lab practices and knowledge forms (including embodied, tacit knowledge forms), to the organization and dynamics of an innovatively designed biomedical research center, and on to the forces shaping the university and research writ large before ending with an exploration of science-as-means-of-development. A great text for undergraduate teaching.
    Kim Fortun, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

    A witty tour of an innovative but marginalized effort in biomedical science, diffracted through the language of agential realism. Applying an ever-widening focus, from the lab bench and local institutional jockeying to efforts at economic development and international patent sales, Krautwurst uses this case study as a concise guide to contemporary issues in the anthropology of science.
    Sergio Sismondo, Queen's University
  • Author Information

    Udo Krautwurst is Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Prince Edward Island. He is a social theorist with a particular interest in the anthropology of representation, practice, and the historical confrontations between forms of knowledge production and technology.
  • Table of contents

    Acknowledgments

    Introduction Intraduction
    A Beginning Is Always in the Middle of Something
    Bioscience in an Out-of-the-Way Place: How It Got Started
    The Organization of the Book: Magnifying Currents
    Science Studies: A Brief Outline of Newtonian and Quantum Versions
    Thirty Years of Bioscience in Action

    A Theoretical and Methodological Intralude
    An Indeterminate List of Agential Realist Concepts
    Thinking through Methods, Thinking Methods through

    1. Intra-Action and Doing Science:
    Experiments, People, and Technology
    Investigating Neuroscience

    2. Re-Visioning Scientific Practice through the ACCBR
    A Vision: From Cooperation to Collaboration
    Structure and Practice, or, Space. . . . the Final Frontier?
    The Near Future of the ACCBR

    3. What Can You Do in, to, and with a University?
    Anthropology and the Call to "Study up"
    The University in Transformation

    4. Science and/as Development
    Science and/as Science Policy:
    The Triple Helix, Modes 1 and 2, and Business Clusters
    Culturing Bioscience on Prince Edward Island

    5. Globalizing Bioscience and/as Biocapital
    Global Biocapital and/as Community
    Bioscience, Biocapital, and Business Clusters: Intellectual Property on PEI

    Concluding:
    Lessons from an Open Concept Lab

    Appendix 1:
    A Parable on Changing Assumptions, or, How to Approximate Agential Realism

    Appendix 2:
    Fieldwork in the Academy, and the Ethics of Ethics

    References

    Index

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