Death in the Peaceable Kingdom: Canadian History since 1867 through Murder, Execution, Assassination, and Suicide

By Dimitry Anastakis

© 2015

Death in the Peaceable Kingdom is an intelligent, innovative response to the incorrect assumption that Canadian history is dry and uninspiring. Using the "hooks" of murder, execution, assassination, and suicide, Dimitry Anastakis introduces readers to the full scope of post-Confederation Canadian history.

Beginning with the assassination of Thomas D'Arcy McGee, Anastakis recounts the deaths of famous Canadians such as Louis Riel, Tom Thomson, and Pierre Laporte. He also introduces lesser-known events such as the execution of shell-shocked deserter Pte. Harold Carter during the First World War and the suicide of suspected communist Herbert Norman in Cairo during the Cold War. The book concludes with recent Canadian deaths including the suicides of Amanda Todd and Rehtaeh Parsons as a result of cyberbullying.

Complementing the chapters are short vignettes—"Murderous Moments" and "Tragic Tales"—that point to broader themes and issues. The book also contains a number of "Active History" exercises such as activities, assignments, and primary document analyses. A timeline, 24 images, and further reading suggestions are included.

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Product Details

  • Division: Higher Education
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 336 pages
  • Dimensions: 7.5in x 0.8in x 9.2in
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SKU# HE000512

  • PUBLISHED MAY 2015
    From: $42.95
    ISBN 9781442606364
  • PUBLISHED MAY 2015
    From: $95.00
    ISBN 9781442634558
  • PUBLISHED MAY 2015
    From: $34.95

Quick Overview

Death in the Peaceable Kingdom is an intelligent, innovative response to the incorrect assumption that Canadian history is dry and uninspiring.

Death in the Peaceable Kingdom: Canadian History since 1867 through Murder, Execution, Assassination, and Suicide

By Dimitry Anastakis

© 2015

Death in the Peaceable Kingdom is an intelligent, innovative response to the incorrect assumption that Canadian history is dry and uninspiring. Using the "hooks" of murder, execution, assassination, and suicide, Dimitry Anastakis introduces readers to the full scope of post-Confederation Canadian history.

Beginning with the assassination of Thomas D'Arcy McGee, Anastakis recounts the deaths of famous Canadians such as Louis Riel, Tom Thomson, and Pierre Laporte. He also introduces lesser-known events such as the execution of shell-shocked deserter Pte. Harold Carter during the First World War and the suicide of suspected communist Herbert Norman in Cairo during the Cold War. The book concludes with recent Canadian deaths including the suicides of Amanda Todd and Rehtaeh Parsons as a result of cyberbullying.

Complementing the chapters are short vignettes—"Murderous Moments" and "Tragic Tales"—that point to broader themes and issues. The book also contains a number of "Active History" exercises such as activities, assignments, and primary document analyses. A timeline, 24 images, and further reading suggestions are included.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Higher Education
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 336 pages
  • Dimensions: 7.5in x 0.8in x 9.2in
  • Reviews

    Our country's past is many things, but never has it been boring. And neither is this book.
    Tim Cook, Canada's History

    Anastakis breathes new life into Canadian history in this innovative volume. Tragedy, conflict, and death lurk throughout Canada's past in ways that may surprise readers. Through captivating narratives of political assassinations, murders, and suicides, Anastakis finds exciting new ways to think about Canada and its history. This highly readable history will draw students into the dark corners of the past and make connections to primary themes of the development of Canada in the years after Confederation.
    Sean Kheraj, York University

    Death in the Peaceable Kingdom is an engaging, entertaining, and enlightening book. Learning Canadian history through murder, suicide, and even mass death is gruesome but fun. This is an excellent book for anyone wanting to learn more about Canada's history.
    James Muir, University of Alberta

    Anastakis aptly uses the conceits of violence and death to reveal the dark underside of Canadian history. Readers will learn about the socioeconomic realities of all classes and ethnicities in post-Confederation Canada. Extremely well done!
    Caroline-Isabelle Caron, Queen's University
  • Author Information

    Dimitry Anastakis teaches Canadian history at Trent University. He has published seven monographs and collections, including Smart Globalization: The Canadian Business and Economic History Experience (2014) and the prize-winning Autonomous State: The Struggle for a Canadian Car Industry from OPEC to Free Trade (2013).
  • Table of contents

    List of Illustrations
    Acknowledgments
    Timeline of Canadian History
    Introduction

    Part One: Our Violent, Bloody Confederation
    1. Thomas D'Arcy McGee, Assassinated, Ottawa, 1868: Terror and Invasion in Confederation-Era Canada
    Murderous Moment: Patrick James Whelan, Executed, Ottawa, 1869
    2. Thomas Scott, Executed or Murdered? Fort Garry, Winnipeg, 1870: The Red River Resistance and the Politics of Westward Expansion
    Murderous Moment: Elizabeth Workman, Executed, Sarnia, Ontario, 1873
    3. George Brown, Assassinated, Toronto, 1880: Dreams of an Emerging Canada
    4. Louis Riel, Executed, Regina, 1885: Open Rebellion and the Fate of the Canadian West
    Tragic Tales: The Frog Lake Massacre and the Execution of Eight First Nations Warriors, Fort Battleford, Present-Day Saskatchewan, 1885
    Murderous Moment: Killing the French Fact Outside of Quebec—Ending Separate (French) Schooling in New Brunswick, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta, and Ontario, 1871-1912

    Part Two: A Nation Forged in Blood?
    Murderous Moment: William C. Hopkinson, Immigration Officer and Secret Agent, Murdered, Vancouver, 1914
    5. Private Harold Carter, Executed, France, 1917: The Tragedy and Heroism of the First World War, 1914-18
    Tragic Tales: Collateral Damages—The Burning of Parliament Hill's Centre Block (1916) and the Halifax Explosion (1917)
    6. Four Rioters Killed by the Canadian Military, Quebec City, Easter 1918: Conscription and the Politics of the Great War at Home
    7. Michael Sokolowiski and Steven Skezerbanovicz, Murdered, Winnipeg, 1919: Capital and Labour Collide in Industrializing Canada
    Murderous Moment: Theatre Impresario Ambrose Small, Murdered? Toronto, 1919
    8. Tom Thomson, Murdered? Canoe Lake, Ontario, 1917: Art, Nationalism, and Americanization in the Interwar Period
    Murderous Moment: William Lyon Mackenzie King Commits Regicide by (Mostly) Killing the British Constitutional Connection to Canada, 1920s
    9. Filumena Lassandro, Executed, Edmonton, 1923: Women, the Roaring Twenties, and the Law
    Murderous Moment: Qallanaaq (White Man) Richard Janes, Killed by Inuit Hunters, Baffin Island, 1920
    Murderous Moment: Coalminer William Davis, Killed by Company Police, Cape Breton, Nova Scotia, 1925
    10. Peter Markunas, Nick Nargan, and Julian Gryshko, Murdered, Saskatchewan, 1931: Labour, the Great Depression, Regional Alienation, and State Response
    Tragic Tales: Two Killed as Police and Mounties Break up the On-to-Ottawa Trek, Regina, Dominion Day (July 1), 1935
    11. Eleven Canadian Soldiers, Murdered by the Nazis, France, 1944: Canada's War?

    Part Three: Postwar Canada—Peaceable, Prosperous, Yet Deadly
    Murderous Moment: John Dick, Murdered, Hamilton, 1946
    12. Death by Car: 2,921 Canadians Killed in Motor Vehicle Accidents, 1953: Cars, Consumption, and Postwar Canadian Society
    Murderous Moment: King Car Kills the Street Railway in Canada, ca. 1955
    13. Herbert Norman, Suicide, Cairo, Egypt, 1957: Cold War Diplomacy, Repression, and Relations with the United States
    Murderous Moment: Marguerite "Madame le Corbeau" Pitre, Conspirator in the 1949 Canadian Pacific Flight 108 Bombing, Last Woman Executed in Canada, Montreal, 1953
    14. Ronald Turpin and Arthur Lucas, Executed, Toronto, 1962: The Death Penalty, Diefenbaker, Pearson, and Social Change in Postwar Canada
    Tragic Tales: "To Kill the Indian in the Child"—Charlie Wenjack, Died in 1966 as Did over 3,000 Aboriginal Children in Indian Residential Schools, 1870s-1990s
    15. Pierre Laporte, Assassinated, Montreal, October 1970: Quebec, the Quiet Revolution, and the FLQ
    Murderous Moment: Victims, Police, Politicians, and Terrorists: What Happened After the October Crisis?
    16. Rochdale College's Cindy Lei Commits Suicide, Toronto, 1975: The Counterculture and the Sixties Revolutionary Moment in Canada
    Murderous Moment: Paul Joseph Chartier, Killed While Attempting to Blow up the House of Commons, 1966
    17. Three Employees of the Quebec National Assembly, Murdered, Quebec City, 1984: The Constitutional Wars Turn Deadly
    18. "Leap of Faith": Brian Mulroney (and Ronald Reagan) Kill the National Policy, 1989: Trade Policy and Postwar Economic Development
    Murderous Moment: Shidane Arone, Murdered by Canadian Troops, Somalia, 1993
    19. Fourteen Quebec Women, Murdered, Montreal, December 6, 1989: Women in Postwar Canada and Violence
    Tragic Tales: Tracy Latimer, "Mercy Killing," Saskatchewan, 1993
    20. Dudley George, Murdered, Ipperwash, Ontario, 1995: Aboriginal Rights and Resistance in Postwar Canada
    Tragic Tales: Sue Rodriguez, Death by Assisted Suicide, British Columbia, 1994
    21. The 329 People on Air India Flight 182, Murdered over the Atlantic Ocean, 1985: Challenges to Immigration and Multiculturalism in an Age of Terror
    Tragic Tales: Amanda Todd and Rehtaeh Parsons, Suicide, 2012 and 2013

    Conclusion: Canada, a Nation of Hope
    Index

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