Drawing Out Law: A Spirit's Guide

by John Borrows

© 2010

The Anishinabek Nation's legal traditions are deeply embedded in many aspects of customary life. In Drawing Out Law, John Borrows (Kegedonce) skillfully juxtaposes Canadian legal policy and practice with the more broadly defined Anishinabek perception of law as it applies to community life, nature, and individuals.

This innovative work combines fictional and non-fictional elements in a series of connected short stories that symbolize different ways of Anishinabek engagement with the world. Drawing on oral traditions, pictographic scrolls, dreams, common law case analysis, and philosophical reflection, Borrows' narrative explores issues of pressing importance to the future of indigenous law and offers readers new ways to think about the direction of Canadian law.

Shedding light on Canadian law and policy as they relate to Indigenous peoples, Drawing Out Law illustrates past and present moral agency of Indigenous peoples and their approaches to the law and calls for the renewal of ancient Ojibway teaching in contemporary circumstances.

This is a major work by one of Canada's leading legal scholars, and an essential companion to Canada's Indigenous Constitution.

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 272 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 1.1in x 9.1in
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SKU# SP002702

  • PUBLISHED APR 2010

    From: $22.46

    Regular Price: $29.95

    ISBN 9781442610095
  • PUBLISHED MAY 2010

    From: $47.25

    Regular Price: $63.00

    ISBN 9781442640689
  • PUBLISHED APR 2010

    From: $24.61

    Regular Price: $28.95

Quick Overview

Shedding light on Canadian law and policy as they relate to Indigenous peoples, Drawing Out Law illustrates past and present moral agency of Indigenous peoples and their approaches to the law and calls for the renewal of ancient Ojibway teaching in contemporary circumstances.

Drawing Out Law: A Spirit's Guide

by John Borrows

© 2010

The Anishinabek Nation's legal traditions are deeply embedded in many aspects of customary life. In Drawing Out Law, John Borrows (Kegedonce) skillfully juxtaposes Canadian legal policy and practice with the more broadly defined Anishinabek perception of law as it applies to community life, nature, and individuals.

This innovative work combines fictional and non-fictional elements in a series of connected short stories that symbolize different ways of Anishinabek engagement with the world. Drawing on oral traditions, pictographic scrolls, dreams, common law case analysis, and philosophical reflection, Borrows' narrative explores issues of pressing importance to the future of indigenous law and offers readers new ways to think about the direction of Canadian law.

Shedding light on Canadian law and policy as they relate to Indigenous peoples, Drawing Out Law illustrates past and present moral agency of Indigenous peoples and their approaches to the law and calls for the renewal of ancient Ojibway teaching in contemporary circumstances.

This is a major work by one of Canada's leading legal scholars, and an essential companion to Canada's Indigenous Constitution.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 272 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 1.1in x 9.1in
  • Reviews

    Drawing Out Law is a book with wide appeal. It is accessible to those with little or no training in either Anishinabek or common law traditions… It will also be of interest to anyone who believes that there is room in law for whole people.’


    Heather Hoiness
    Saskatchewan Law Review, vol 76: 2013

    'Drawing Out Law is a thoughtful, moving, surprising, and highly original book—as much a work of literature as a study in Indigenous law. It is honest and insightful, funny and serious, tragic and hopeful, blending personal narrative with acute observations about the dilemmas facing many Indigenous peoples and individuals today. A profound symbolism is woven throughout the work, which gives it deeper layers of meaning that engage the emotions and resonate in the mind. There is nothing else quite like this terrific book.'
    Brian Slattery, Osgoode Hall Law School, York University

    'In this creative and sophisticated work, John Borrows makes an "academic" type of argument in an Indigenous voice. Weaving together Anishinabek and Western European understandings of the meaning of law, Borrows pursues a unique vision, one that should lead to more fruitful and enlightening ways of thinking about and understanding the Aboriginal-Canadian legal and political relationship.'
    Dale Turner, Department of Government, Dartmouth College
  • Author Information

    John Borrows is the Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law in the Faculty of Law at the University of Victoria.
  • Table of contents

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    PART I: ZEEGWUNIssues: The First Hill
    CHAPTER ONE: DAEBAUJIMOOT..........................................................8
    CHAPTER TWO: W'AUD-ISSOOKAE.......................................................28
    CHAPTER THREE: PAUWAUWAEWIN...................................................46
    CHAPTER FOUR: DAEB-AWAEWIN.......................................................72
    Part II: NEEBINIndividuals: The Second Hill
    CHAPTER FIVE: PAUGUK..........................................................................107
    CHAPTER SIX: AUD-WAUDJIMOOWIN.................................................129
    CHAPTER SEVEN: ANIMIKEEK & MISHI-BIZHEU.............................141
    CHAPTER EIGHT: W'PISHEBAUBEE-AUSHIH......................................158
    Part III: TIKWAUKIKInstitutions: The Third Hill
    CHAPTER NINE: AUGOONAET-WAENDUMOOWIN...........................172
    CHAPTER TEN: ASHAWA-MUNISSOOWIN..........................................201
    CHAPER ELEVEN: MAEMAEGAWAHSESSIWUK................................218
    CHAPTER TWELVE: ISKUGAEWIN.........................................................232
     
    Part IV: BEEBON Ideas: The Fourth Hill
    CHAPTER THIRTEEN: MAUZ-AUBINDUMOOWIN.............................259
    CHAPTER FOURTEEN: AUNAGWAUM-IZIWIN....................................273
    CHAPTER FIFTEEN: WINDIGOS..............................................................296
    CHAPTER SIXTEEN: CHEEBY-AKEENG.................................................312




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