Entangled Territorialities: Negotiating Indigenous Lands in Australia and Canada

Edited by Françoise Dussart and Sylvie Poirier

© 2017

Entangled Territorialities offers vivid ethnographic examples of how Indigenous lands in Australia and Canada are tangled with governments, industries, and mainstream society. Most of the entangled lands to which Indigenous peoples are connected have been physically transformed and their ecological balance destroyed. Each chapter in this volume refers to specific circumstances in which Indigenous peoples have become intertwined with non-Aboriginal institutions and projects including the construction of hydroelectric dams and open mining pits. Long after the agents of resource extraction have abandoned these lands to their fate, Indigenous peoples will continue to claim ancestral ties and responsibilities that cannot be understood by agents of capitalism. The editors and contributors to this volume develop an anthropology of entanglement to further examine the larger debates about the vexed relationships between settlers and indigenous peoples over the meaning, knowledge, and management of traditionally-owned lands.

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 272 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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Quick Overview

Entangled Territorialities offers vivid ethnographic examples of how Indigenous lands in Australia and Canada are tangled with governments, industries, and mainstream society.

Entangled Territorialities: Negotiating Indigenous Lands in Australia and Canada

Edited by Françoise Dussart and Sylvie Poirier

© 2017

Entangled Territorialities offers vivid ethnographic examples of how Indigenous lands in Australia and Canada are tangled with governments, industries, and mainstream society. Most of the entangled lands to which Indigenous peoples are connected have been physically transformed and their ecological balance destroyed. Each chapter in this volume refers to specific circumstances in which Indigenous peoples have become intertwined with non-Aboriginal institutions and projects including the construction of hydroelectric dams and open mining pits. Long after the agents of resource extraction have abandoned these lands to their fate, Indigenous peoples will continue to claim ancestral ties and responsibilities that cannot be understood by agents of capitalism. The editors and contributors to this volume develop an anthropology of entanglement to further examine the larger debates about the vexed relationships between settlers and indigenous peoples over the meaning, knowledge, and management of traditionally-owned lands.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 272 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "This is an excellent collection of essays by Australian and Canadian anthropologists on the interaction of Aboriginal peoples with the dominant settler society in their countries."


    Peter Russell, University Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto

    "Entangled Territorialities advances discussions of the position of Indigenous people in contemporary liberal nation-states, exemplified by Canada and Australia. In particular, the volume attacks the complexities of attempts to consider continued Indigenous presence and rights to territory and it moves beyond claims of pure sociocultural continuity towards an understanding of the ways in which Indigenous people pursue life-projects which embody some kind of autonomy for themselves."


    Fred R. Myers, Silver Professor of Anthropology, New York University
  • Author Information

    Françoise Dussart is a professor in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Connecticut.


    Sylvie Poirier is a professor in the Department of Anthropology at Université Laval.
  • Table of contents

    Foreword
    John Borrows

    1. Knowing and Managing the Land: The Conundrum of Coexistence and Entanglement
    Françoise Dussart and Sylvie Poirier

    2. Dialogues on Surviving: Eeyou Hunters’ Ways of Engaging Developers and Eeyou Youth
    Harvey A. Feit

    3. The Endurance of Relational Ontology: Encounters between Eeyouch and Sport Hunters
    Colin H. Scott

    4. Australia’s Indigenous Protected Areas: Resistance, Articulation and Entanglement in the Context of Natural Resource Management
    Frances Morphy

    5. Mediation between Indigenous and Non-Indigenous Knowledge Systems: Another Analysis of "two-way" Conservation in Northern Australia
    Elodie Fache

    6. Cultural Politics of Land and Animals in Treaty Eight Territory (Northern Alberta, Canada)
    Clinton N. Westman

    7. Entanglements in Coast Salish Ancestral Territories
    Brian Thom

    8. Transmission of Knowledge, Clans and Lands among the Yolŋu  (Northern Territory, Australia)
    Sachiko Kubota

    9. Alien relations: Ecological and Ontological Dilemmas Posed for Indigenous Australians in the Management of "Feral" Camels on their Lands
    Petronella Vaarzon-Morel

    10. Nehirowisiw Territoriality: Negotiating and Managing Entanglement and Co- existence.
    Sylvie Poirier

    11. Is There a Role for Anthropology in Cultural Reproduction? Maps, Mining and the ‘Cultural Future’ in Central Australia
    Nicolas Peterson

    Afterword
    Michael Asch

    Contributors