Fighting Words: Imperial Censorship and the Russian Press, 1804-1906

Charles A. Ruud

© 2009

Censorship took many forms in Imperial Russia. First published in 1982, Fighting Words focuses on the most common form: the governmental system that screened written works before or after publication to determine their acceptability. Charles A. Ruud shows that, despite this system, the nineteenth-century Russian Imperial government came to grant far more extensive legal publishing freedoms than most Westerners realize, adopting a more liberal attitude towards the press by permitting it a position recognized by law.

Fighting Words also reveals, however, that the government fell far short of implementing these reforms, thus contributing to the growth of opposition to the Tsarist regime in the second half of the nineteenth century and the first few years of the twentieth. Now back in print with a new introduction by the author, Fighting Words is a classic work offering insight into the press, censorship, and the limits of printed expression in Imperial Russia.

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 330 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.8in x 8.9in
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SKU# SP002789

  • PUBLISHED JUL 2009

    From: $35.21

    Regular Price: $46.95

    ISBN 9781442610248
  • PUBLISHED JUL 2009

    From: $33.71

    Regular Price: $44.95

Quick Overview

First published in 1982, Fighting Words focuses on the most common form of censorship in Imperial Russia: the governmental system that screened written works before or after publication to determine their acceptability.

Fighting Words: Imperial Censorship and the Russian Press, 1804-1906

Charles A. Ruud

© 2009

Censorship took many forms in Imperial Russia. First published in 1982, Fighting Words focuses on the most common form: the governmental system that screened written works before or after publication to determine their acceptability. Charles A. Ruud shows that, despite this system, the nineteenth-century Russian Imperial government came to grant far more extensive legal publishing freedoms than most Westerners realize, adopting a more liberal attitude towards the press by permitting it a position recognized by law.

Fighting Words also reveals, however, that the government fell far short of implementing these reforms, thus contributing to the growth of opposition to the Tsarist regime in the second half of the nineteenth century and the first few years of the twentieth. Now back in print with a new introduction by the author, Fighting Words is a classic work offering insight into the press, censorship, and the limits of printed expression in Imperial Russia.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 330 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.8in x 8.9in
  • Reviews

    'Fighting Words is an intelligent, unpretentious, and compact monograph, and scholars dealing with Imperial Russia will find it helpful ... Fighting Words is thoroughly documented, well written, and carefully researched. Students of the period will use it often and with confidence for some time to come.'


    Abbott Gleason
    Russian Review

    'Fighting Words is the best study by far of the legal and political aspects of censorship in the Russian Empire. Charles A. Ruud brings detail, rigour, and legal expertise to his subject, and all students of Russian literature and history should be familiar with this book. The new introduction brings the book up to date on several key issues.'


    William Mills Todd III, Harry Tuchman Levin Professor of Literature, Harvard University
  • Author Information

    Charles A. Ruud is professor emeritus in the Department of History at the University of Western Ontario.

  • Table of contents

    Preface

    Introduction to the 2009 Edition

    Introduction

    1 The European Pattern and the Beginnings of Russian Censorship
    2 The Early Administrative System and the Rise of Mysticism, 1801-17
    3 Golitsyn's Fall and the Decline of Mysticism
    4 Nicholas I's Censorship Innovations, 1825-32
    5 Censorship and the New Journalism, 1832-48
    6 A System under Siege, 1848-55
    7 Confused Steps towards Reform, 1855-61
    8 The Dilemmas of Liberal Censorship, 1862-63
    9 The Reform of 6 April 1865
    10 The First Year of the Reformed System, 1865-66
    11 Control of Press Freedom: Warnings, Court Cases, and Libel Laws, 1867-89
    12 Censorship, Repression, and the Emergence of a 'European' Press, 1869-89
    13 The Last Years of the Administrative System, 1889-1906
    14 Autocracy and the Press: The Historical Conflict

    Appendix 1 Regulations on the Press, 6 April 1865

    Appendix 2 Tables

    Notes

    Bibliography

    Index