Hegel and Canada: Unity of Opposites?

Edited by Susan M. Dodd and Neil G. Robertson

© 2018

Hegel has had a remarkable, yet largely unremarked, role in Canada's intellectual development. In the last half of the twentieth-century, as Canada was coming to define itself in the wake of World War Two, some of Canada’s most thoughtful scholars turned to the work of G.W.F. Hegel for insight.

Hegel and Canada is a collection of essays that analyses the real, but under-recognized, role Hegel has played in the intellectual and political development of Canada. The volume focuses on the generation of Canadian scholars who emerged after World War Two: James Doull, Emil Fackenheim, George Grant, Henry S. Harris, and Charles Taylor. These thinkers offer a uniquely Canadian view of Hegel's writings, and, correspondingly, of possible relations between situated community and rational law. Hegel provided a unique intellectual resource for thinking through the complex and opposing aspects that characterize Canada. The volume brings together key scholars from each of these five schools of Canadian Hegel studies and provides a richly nuanced account of the intellectually significant connection of Hegel and Canada.

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 408 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP003345

  • PUBLISHED FEB 2018

    From: $60.00

    Regular Price: $80.00

    ISBN 9781442644472
  • PUBLISHED FEB 2018

    From: $63.75

    Regular Price: $85.00

Quick Overview

Hegel and Canada is a collection of essays that analyses the real, but under-recognized, role Hegel has played in the intellectual and political development of Canada. The volume focuses on the generation of Canadian scholars who emerged after World War Two: James Doull, Emil Fackenheim, George Grant, Henry S. Harris, and Charles Taylor.

Hegel and Canada: Unity of Opposites?

Edited by Susan M. Dodd and Neil G. Robertson

© 2018

Hegel has had a remarkable, yet largely unremarked, role in Canada's intellectual development. In the last half of the twentieth-century, as Canada was coming to define itself in the wake of World War Two, some of Canada’s most thoughtful scholars turned to the work of G.W.F. Hegel for insight.

Hegel and Canada is a collection of essays that analyses the real, but under-recognized, role Hegel has played in the intellectual and political development of Canada. The volume focuses on the generation of Canadian scholars who emerged after World War Two: James Doull, Emil Fackenheim, George Grant, Henry S. Harris, and Charles Taylor. These thinkers offer a uniquely Canadian view of Hegel's writings, and, correspondingly, of possible relations between situated community and rational law. Hegel provided a unique intellectual resource for thinking through the complex and opposing aspects that characterize Canada. The volume brings together key scholars from each of these five schools of Canadian Hegel studies and provides a richly nuanced account of the intellectually significant connection of Hegel and Canada.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 408 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "Hegel and Canada provides critical insights into the development of Canadian political thought, and into debates on modernity, technology, globalization, multiculturalism, and imperialism. The volume is innovative in its scope and its formulation of central problems in contemporary political theory. It is a significant contribution to the understanding of Hegel’s receptions and influences in Canada."


    Douglas Moggach, Department of Philosophy, University of Ottawa and University of Sydney
  • Author Information

    Susan Dodd is an associate professor of humanities and social sciences at the University of King’s College, in Halifax.


    Neil G. Robertson is an associate professor of humanities and social sciences and Director of the Foundation Year Program at University of King’s College, in Halifax.
  • Table of contents

    Contents

    1. Introduction: Unity of Opposites? Hegel and Canada, by Susan Dodd

    HEGEL AND CANADIAN POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY

    2. Hegel in Canada, by John Burbidge

    3. Jewish and Post-Christian Interpretations of Hegel: Emil Fackenheim and Henry S. Harris, by George di Giovanni

    4. Fackenheim on Self-making, Divine and Human, by Daniel Brandes

    5. Conscience, Religion, and Multiculturalism: A Canadian Hegel, by John Russon

    6. Conquering Finitude: Towards a Renewed Hegelian Middle, by Jim Vernon

    7. Hegel’s Theory of Mind, by Charles Taylor

    8. Negativity: Charles Taylor, Hegel and the Problem of Modern Freedom, by Kenneth Kierans

    HEGEL IN CANADIAN POLITICS

    9. Early Canadian Political Culture: Hegelian Adaptations and John Watson, by Elizabeth Trott

    10. Idealism and Empire: John Watson, Michael Ignatieff and the moral warrant for "liberal imperialism," by Robert Sibley

    11. Beyond ‘Hegel’s time’: Made in the USA. Not Available in Canada, by David

    MacGregor

    12. Freedom and the Tradition: George Grant, James Doull and the Character of Modernity, by

    Neil Robertson

    13.Grant, Hegel and the ‘Impossibility of Canada,’ by Robert Sibley

    14. Hegel and Canada’s Constitution, by Graeme Nicholson

    15. Hegel’s Laurentian Fragments, by Barry Cooper

    16. Hegel and the Challenges of Cross-Cultural Feminism, by Shannon Hoff

    17. Conclusion Canada and the Unity of Opposites?, by Neil Robertson

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