"I AM": Monotheism and the Philosophy of the Bible

By Mark Glouberman

© 2019

For whom was the Hebrew Bible written? How much truth does it contain? What, according to the Bible, is the place of men and women in the world? What connection is there between the Bible and morality? In "I AM" Mark Glouberman supplies new answers to these old questions. He does this by establishing that the foundational scripture of the West is, first and foremost, a philosophical document, not a theological tract, nor yet the religious history of a nation.

The author identifies the Bible’s fundamental principle, the ontological principle of particularity. This principle, he shows, is what makes the Bible the revolutionary text that it is. God’s "I AM WHO I AM" asserts the principle, of which the Bible’s deity is a personified form. God’s self-identification also points to the real, anthropological, meaning of the ism called "monotheism." A portion of Glouberman’s book is devoted to illustrating the Bible’s live relevance in many of the areas where modern philosophers congregate, including moral philosophy, political philosophy, metaphysics, and epistemology.

Isn’t it a bit late in the day for the Bible’s meaning to be revealed? Glouberman says that it’s about time.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 264 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.0in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP005061

  • PUBLISHED FEB 2019

    From: $56.25

    Regular Price: $75.00

    ISBN 9781487503406
  • PUBLISHED FEB 2019

    From: $56.25

    Regular Price: $75.00

Quick Overview

The Bible is philosophy. God’s "I AM WHO I AM" asserts its principle, an ontological principle having to do with the nature of persons. Western religion, confusing the principle for a person, rests on a mistake. Greek-based philosophy, missing the principle, is deficient.

"I AM": Monotheism and the Philosophy of the Bible

By Mark Glouberman

© 2019

For whom was the Hebrew Bible written? How much truth does it contain? What, according to the Bible, is the place of men and women in the world? What connection is there between the Bible and morality? In "I AM" Mark Glouberman supplies new answers to these old questions. He does this by establishing that the foundational scripture of the West is, first and foremost, a philosophical document, not a theological tract, nor yet the religious history of a nation.

The author identifies the Bible’s fundamental principle, the ontological principle of particularity. This principle, he shows, is what makes the Bible the revolutionary text that it is. God’s "I AM WHO I AM" asserts the principle, of which the Bible’s deity is a personified form. God’s self-identification also points to the real, anthropological, meaning of the ism called "monotheism." A portion of Glouberman’s book is devoted to illustrating the Bible’s live relevance in many of the areas where modern philosophers congregate, including moral philosophy, political philosophy, metaphysics, and epistemology.

Isn’t it a bit late in the day for the Bible’s meaning to be revealed? Glouberman says that it’s about time.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 264 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.0in x 9.3in
  • Reviews

    "Multidisciplinary, Mark Glouberman’s research and analysis range from Jewish studies, through biblical studies and theology, and into both Continental and analytic philosophy. Representing a lifetime of thought, ‘I AM’ is a stimulating investigation on important thinkers, representing a new direction in philosophy."


    Roger Ebertz, Department of Philosophy, University of Dubuque

    "‘I AM’ is innovative and intriguing. Mark Glouberman develops the text with considerable scholarship, wit, and subtlety and makes a serious contribution to the philosophical study of biblical texts."


    Shalom Lappin, Department of Philosophy, King’s College London
  • Author Information

    Mark Glouberman is an instructor in the Department of Philosophy at Kwantlen Polytechnic University.
  • Table of contents

    1. Philosophy: Pagan and Jewish
    2. The Inaugural Lecture
    3. Natural Philosophy: System and Humankind
    4. Philosophical Anthropology: First Person, Singular
    5. Moral Philosophy: The Commandments
    6. Axiology and Ecology
    7. Political Philosophy: The City and the Tower
    8. Epistemology and Metaphysics: Naming and Being
    9. Philosophy of Mind: Straddling Jordan
    10. Suffering and Logic
    Conclusion: Does Western Religion Rest on a Mistake?

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