Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands: Kyiv, 1800-1905

By Serhiy Bilenky

© 2017

In the nineteenth and early twentieth century Kyiv was an important city in the European part of the Russian empire, rivaling Warsaw in economic and strategic significance. It also held the unrivaled spiritual and ideological position as Russia’s own Jerusalem. In Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands, Serhiy Bilenky examines issues of space, urban planning, socio-spatial form, and the perceptions of change in imperial Kyiv. Combining cultural and social history with urban studies, Bilenky unearths a wide range of unpublished archival materials and argues that the changes experienced by the city prior to the revolution of 1917 were no less dramatic and traumatic than those of the Communist and post-Communist era. In fact, much of Kyiv’s contemporary urban form, architecture, and natural setting were shaped by imperial modernizers during the long nineteenth century. The author also explores a general culture of imperial urbanism in Eastern Europe.  Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands is the first work to approach the history of Kyiv from an interdisciplinary perspective and showcases Kyiv’s rightful place as a city worthy of attention from historians, urbanists, and literary scholars.

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 612 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.5in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP004654

  • PUBLISHED APR 2018

    From: $71.25

    Regular Price: $95.00

    ISBN 9781487501723
  • PUBLISHED APR 2018

    From: $71.25

    Regular Price: $95.00

Quick Overview

Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands is the first work to approach the history of Kyiv from an interdisciplinary perspective and showcases Kyiv’s rightful place as a city worthy of attention from historians, urbanists, and literary scholars.

Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands: Kyiv, 1800-1905

By Serhiy Bilenky

© 2017

In the nineteenth and early twentieth century Kyiv was an important city in the European part of the Russian empire, rivaling Warsaw in economic and strategic significance. It also held the unrivaled spiritual and ideological position as Russia’s own Jerusalem. In Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands, Serhiy Bilenky examines issues of space, urban planning, socio-spatial form, and the perceptions of change in imperial Kyiv. Combining cultural and social history with urban studies, Bilenky unearths a wide range of unpublished archival materials and argues that the changes experienced by the city prior to the revolution of 1917 were no less dramatic and traumatic than those of the Communist and post-Communist era. In fact, much of Kyiv’s contemporary urban form, architecture, and natural setting were shaped by imperial modernizers during the long nineteenth century. The author also explores a general culture of imperial urbanism in Eastern Europe.  Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands is the first work to approach the history of Kyiv from an interdisciplinary perspective and showcases Kyiv’s rightful place as a city worthy of attention from historians, urbanists, and literary scholars.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 612 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.5in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "Examining novels, travel accounts, statistical data, and a myriad of archival sources, Bilenky displays a vast knowledge of obscure materials, as well as major works on global urbanism."


    Michael F. Hamm, Ewing T. Boles Professor of History, emeritus, Centre College

    "Bringing together literary and archival material, Bilenky unpacks a sophisticated knowledge of current trends in urban history."


    Theodore R. Weeks, professor of History, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale
  • Author Information

    Serhiy Bilenky is a research fellow in at the Chair of Ukrainian Studies at the University of Toronto. He has taught at Columbia University and Harvard University’s Ukrainian Research Institute.
  • Table of contents

    List of Illustrations and Tables

    Acknowledgements

    Maps

    Introduction

    Part I Representing the City

    Chapter 1 Mapping the city in transition

    Chapter 2 Using the past: The great cemetery of Rus’

    Part II Making the City

    Chapter 3 Municipal autonomy under the Magdeburg Law, 1800-1835

    Chapter 4 Planning a new city: empire transforms space, 1835-1870

    Chapter 5 Municipal autonomy reloaded: space for sale, 1871-1905

    Part III Peopling the City

    Chapter 6 Counting Kyivites: the language of class, religion, and ethnicity

    Chapter 7 Municipal elites and “urban regimes”: continuities and disruptions

    Part IV Living (in) the City

    Chapter 8 Sociospatial form and psychogeography

     Chapter 9 What language did the monuments speak?

    Conclusion: Towards a Theory of Imperial Urbanism in the Borderlands

    Notes

    Bibliography 560

    Index