Information in the Labour Market: Job-Worker Matching and Its Implications for Education in Ontario

By James B. Davies and Glenn M.T. MacDonald

© 1984

This study uses a simple model of information gathering to generate policy recommendations concerning education in Ontario, especially at the post-secondary level. The schools are viewed as helping students discover jobs matched to their abilities, and policy prescriptions are offered from that standpoint.

After examining earlier economic models of education – seeing it in terms of human capital and signalling – the authors analyse their informational model. In the light of the three theories of education, they then proceed to examine the appropriate role of government in the education market, and offer their policy recommendations. In addition, trends in the structure of education over the last two decades are studied and explained from the economic point of view. They argue that too much has been spent on formal education and not enough on on-the-job-training, but the answer is not more government intervention or vocationalism. Education policy should encourage free choice and an increasing ability to match interests or skills with jobs. Vocationalism merely hinders the latter and endangers economic well-being in the long term.

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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 200 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.5in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP004628

  • PUBLISHED AUG 1984

    From: $20.96

    Regular Price: $27.95

    ISBN 9780802034038
  • PUBLISHED DEC 1984

    From: $20.96

    Regular Price: $27.95

Quick Overview

This study uses a simple model of information gathering to generate policy recommendations concerning education in Ontario, especially at the post-secondary level.

Information in the Labour Market: Job-Worker Matching and Its Implications for Education in Ontario

By James B. Davies and Glenn M.T. MacDonald

© 1984

This study uses a simple model of information gathering to generate policy recommendations concerning education in Ontario, especially at the post-secondary level. The schools are viewed as helping students discover jobs matched to their abilities, and policy prescriptions are offered from that standpoint.

After examining earlier economic models of education – seeing it in terms of human capital and signalling – the authors analyse their informational model. In the light of the three theories of education, they then proceed to examine the appropriate role of government in the education market, and offer their policy recommendations. In addition, trends in the structure of education over the last two decades are studied and explained from the economic point of view. They argue that too much has been spent on formal education and not enough on on-the-job-training, but the answer is not more government intervention or vocationalism. Education policy should encourage free choice and an increasing ability to match interests or skills with jobs. Vocationalism merely hinders the latter and endangers economic well-being in the long term.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 200 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.5in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    James B. Davies is a member of the Department of Economics at the University of Western Ontario.



    Glenn M.T. MacDonald is the John M. Olin Distinguished Professor of Economics and Strategy at the Olin Business School, Washington University in St. Louis.