Jobs and Justice: Fighting Discrimination in Wartime Canada, 1939-1945

By Carmela K. Patrias

© 2011

Despite acute labour shortages during the Second World War, Canadian employers—with the complicity of state officials—discriminated against workers of African, Asian, and Eastern and Southern European origin, excluding them from both white collar and skilled jobs. Jobs and Justice argues that, while the war intensified hostility and suspicion toward minority workers, the urgent need for their contributions and the egalitarian rhetoric used to mobilize the war effort also created an opportunity for minority activists and their English Canadian allies to challenge discrimination.

Juxtaposing a discussion of state policy with ideas of race and citizenship in Canadian civil society, Carmela K. Patrias shows how minority activists were able to bring national attention to racist employment discrimination and obtain official condemnation of such discrimination. Extensively researched and engagingly written, Jobs and Justice offers a new perspective on the Second World War, the racist dimensions of state policy, and the origins of human rights campaigns in Canada.

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 256 pages
  • Illustrations: 12
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.0in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP003019

  • PUBLISHED JAN 2012

    From: $21.71

    Regular Price: $28.95

    ISBN 9781442611283
  • PUBLISHED MAR 2012

    From: $49.50

    Regular Price: $66.00

    ISBN 9781442642362
  • PUBLISHED JAN 2012

    From: $21.71

    Regular Price: $28.95

Quick Overview

Juxtaposing a discussion of state policy with ideas of race and citizenship in Canadian civil society, Carmela K. Patrias shows how minority activists were able to bring national attention to racist employment discrimination during the Second World War and obtain official condemnation of such discrimination.

Jobs and Justice: Fighting Discrimination in Wartime Canada, 1939-1945

By Carmela K. Patrias

© 2011

Despite acute labour shortages during the Second World War, Canadian employers—with the complicity of state officials—discriminated against workers of African, Asian, and Eastern and Southern European origin, excluding them from both white collar and skilled jobs. Jobs and Justice argues that, while the war intensified hostility and suspicion toward minority workers, the urgent need for their contributions and the egalitarian rhetoric used to mobilize the war effort also created an opportunity for minority activists and their English Canadian allies to challenge discrimination.

Juxtaposing a discussion of state policy with ideas of race and citizenship in Canadian civil society, Carmela K. Patrias shows how minority activists were able to bring national attention to racist employment discrimination and obtain official condemnation of such discrimination. Extensively researched and engagingly written, Jobs and Justice offers a new perspective on the Second World War, the racist dimensions of state policy, and the origins of human rights campaigns in Canada.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 256 pages
  • Illustrations: 12
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.0in x 9.3in
  • Author Information

    Carmela K. Patrias is an associate professor in the Department of History at Brock University.

  • Table of contents

    Introduction

    PART ONE: Invidious Distinctions

    1. Employment Discrimination and State Complicity

    PART TWO Discrimination Is Sabotage: Minority Accommodation, Protest and Resistance

    1. Jews
    2. Other Racialized Citizens
    3. The Disenfranchised

    PART THREE: Ambivalent Allies: Anglo-Saxon Critics of Discrimination

    1. Mainstream Critics and the Burden of Inherited Ideas    
    2. Labour and the Left

    PART FOUR: Anglo-Saxon Guardianship

    1. Anglo-Saxon Guardianship

    Conclusion

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