Journal of Scholarly Publishing

Edited by Alex Holzman & Robert Brown

Published Quarterly | E-ISSN 1710-1166 | ISSN 1198-9742

This Journal is online at:

JSP Online and Project MUSE

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The Journal of Scholarly Publishing targets the unique issues facing the scholarly publishing industry today. It is the indispensable resource for academics and publishers that addresses the new challenges resulting from changes in technology, funding and innovations in publishing. In serving the wide-ranging interests of the international academic publishing community, JSP provides a balanced look at the issues and concerns, from solutions to everyday publishing problems to commentary on the philosophical questions at large.

JSP has also examined the future of scholarly publishing, scholarship on the web, digitization, copyright, editorial policies, computer applications, marketing, and pricing models.

JSP was launched in October 1969 by staff at University of Toronto Press to explore scholarly publishing in the world of the university press. In the inaugural editorial, Marsh Jeanneret, then Director of the Press, outlined the purpose of the journal, discussing the university press’s relationship to its parent institution, the business structure of academic publishing, the nature of copyright, and the rapidly evolving technology of communication – concerns still paramount for university presses today.

Forty-five years later, JSP continues to confront and document the challenges and achievements of academic publishers and serve the wide-ranging interests of the international academic publishing community. Articles examine the age-old problems in publishing as well as contemporary challenges resulting from changes in technology and funding through the exploration of topics such as editorial and publishing policy, computer applications, electronic publishing, effective marketing, and business management. Through balanced analysis of industry issues and concerns, JSP offers a unique blend of philosophical analysis and practical advice that has attracted readers around the world.

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Quick Overview

The Journal of Scholarly Publishing targets the unique issues facing the scholarly publishing industry today. It is the indispensable resource for academics and publishers that addresses the new challenges resulting from changes in technology, funding and innovations in publishing. In serving the wide-ranging interests of the international academic publishing community, JSP provides a balanced look at the issues and concerns, from solutions to everyday publishing problems to commentary on the philosophical questions at large.

JSP has also examined the future of scholarly publishing, scholarship on the web, digitization, copyright, editorial policies, computer applications, marketing, and pricing models.

JSP was launched in October 1969 by staff at University of Toronto Press to explore scholarly publishing in the world of the university press. In the inaugural editorial, Marsh Jeanneret, then Director of the Press, outlined the purpose of the journal, discussing the university press’s relationship to its parent institution, the business structure of academic publishing, the nature of copyright, and the rapidly evolving technology of communication – concerns still paramount for university presses today.

Journal of Scholarly Publishing

Edited by Alex Holzman & Robert Brown

Published Quarterly | E-ISSN 1710-1166 | ISSN 1198-9742

This Journal is online at:

JSP Online and Project MUSE

Sign up for JSP Alerts

Join the conversation
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email

The Journal of Scholarly Publishing targets the unique issues facing the scholarly publishing industry today. It is the indispensable resource for academics and publishers that addresses the new challenges resulting from changes in technology, funding and innovations in publishing. In serving the wide-ranging interests of the international academic publishing community, JSP provides a balanced look at the issues and concerns, from solutions to everyday publishing problems to commentary on the philosophical questions at large.

JSP has also examined the future of scholarly publishing, scholarship on the web, digitization, copyright, editorial policies, computer applications, marketing, and pricing models.

JSP was launched in October 1969 by staff at University of Toronto Press to explore scholarly publishing in the world of the university press. In the inaugural editorial, Marsh Jeanneret, then Director of the Press, outlined the purpose of the journal, discussing the university press’s relationship to its parent institution, the business structure of academic publishing, the nature of copyright, and the rapidly evolving technology of communication – concerns still paramount for university presses today.

Forty-five years later, JSP continues to confront and document the challenges and achievements of academic publishers and serve the wide-ranging interests of the international academic publishing community. Articles examine the age-old problems in publishing as well as contemporary challenges resulting from changes in technology and funding through the exploration of topics such as editorial and publishing policy, computer applications, electronic publishing, effective marketing, and business management. Through balanced analysis of industry issues and concerns, JSP offers a unique blend of philosophical analysis and practical advice that has attracted readers around the world.

Continue Reading Read Less
  • Editorial board

    Editors
    Alex Holzman comes to JSP from a long and accomplished career in scholarly publishing. He was the director of Temple University Press and president of the Association of American University Presses from 2008-2009. Alex also manages a scholarly communications consultant firm, Alex Publishing Solutions.

    Robert Brown has a Ph.D. in English and has completed the Scholarly Publishing Program at Arizona State University. A published contributor to past issues of JSP, Robert also has lent his skills to the Journal of Neurosurgery and Science Editor, in addition to his freelance editorial work.

    Contact the Editors: jsp@utpress.utoronto.ca

    Editorial Advisory Board
    Al Greco, Fordham Business School
    Rich Hendel, Freelance Designer
    Penny Kaiserlian, Director Emerita, University of Virginia Press
    Nicole Mitchell, Director, University of Washington Press
    Ian Montagnes, Editor Emeritus
    Jane Potter, Oxford Brookes University, UK
    Bill Regier, Director, University of Illinois Press
    William W. Savage Jr., Emeritus, University of Oklahoma
    Bill Sisler, Director, Harvard University Press
    Michael F. Suarez, S.J., Director, Rare Book School, University of Virginia
    Sandy Thatcher, Director Emeritus, Penn State University Press

  • Open Access Policy

    In response to the Tri-Agency Open Access Policy on Publications, the Journal of Scholarly Publishing has developed a plan to ensure our authors are able to comply with the policy. There are two open access options allowed by the Tri-Agency, green and gold:

    Green Open Access
    Twelve (12) months after publication of the version of record (i.e., the article after copyediting, tagging, typesetting, etc.), the author may deposit a copy of the accepted article in their institutional repository with a DOI or direct link to the version of record. Please let us know when the deposit is made so that we can update our records.

    Gold Open Access
    At publication, the final version of record will become freely available on our primary platform, utpjournals.press. The Author Publication Charge is $3,000.

  • Abstracting and indexing

  • Advertising

    A must for anyone who crosses the scholarly publishing path—authors, editors, marketers, and publishers of books and journals—JSP is the indispensable resource for academics and publishers that addresses the new challenges resulting from changes in technology, funding, and innovations in publishing.

    Frequency: published 4 times per year by University of Toronto Press

    Distribution: available through UTP Journals Online and in print

    Production Requirements for Print Ads:

    • Digital file is required for all display advertisements
    • High-Res PDF, PC Adobe Photoshop (tiff or eps), Adobe Illustrator (eps), or InDesign files
    • All support files and fonts must be embedded
    • Support files must be saved as tiff or eps files at a minimum resolution of 300 dpi

    Web ads:

    • Electronic files of company logo and/or image should be supplied by the advertiser.
    • Banner ads must be supplied as GIF files (containing images and text) to a maximum file size of 15K.
    • The banner ad should have no more than 3 rotations.
    • Web ads should be in the RGB colour space.
    • Please also supply the URL for the linking page to your ad.
    • Web ad bookings will be accepted until the 15th of each month and ads will be posted to the web by the first business day of the following month.

    Contact
    Advertising Inquiries
    University of Toronto Press
    5201 Dufferin Street
    Toronto, Ontario Canada M3H 5T8
    Email: advertising@utpress.utoronto.ca

  • Author resources

    Updated 30 March 2017
    Download PDF

    Send submissions to:
    Alex Holzman and Robert Brown
    jsp@utpress.utoronto.ca

    Manuscript Preparation

    • Manuscript must be in MS Word (.doc or .docx), be 1500 to 6000 words long (endnotes included), and should have no formatting or styles added only to enhance its appearance; plainer is easier to edit.
    • Use hard returns only at the end of paragraphs; do not use space bar to indent or to center text; do not add extra space between paragraphs, insert headers or footers, or put two spaces after periods.
    • Manuscript must include an 1) abstract of around 150 words; 2) up to five subject keywords (word or short phrase); 3) biographical note of fifteen to fifty words for each author, written in complete sentences, which may include an email address.
    • References are endnotes that run consecutively at the end of the manuscript. Use MS Word’s automatic endnote function to insert a superscript Arabic number; these numbers appear after punctuation and closing quotation mark, with no intervening space: e.g., ‘Superscript number goes outside.’14
    • Explanatory notes that are not references are also inserted as consecutive endnotes using a superscript Arabic number; they are interspersed with, not separated from, reference endnotes.
    • Figures must be sent as separate high-resolution (minimum of 300 pixels per inch) JPEG, TIFF, or EPS files in colour if possible (images will be published in greyscale in print and colour online; low-resolution figures may also be inserted in the manuscript for convenience of reading); figures need to have a descriptive caption (e.g., Figure 1. Bar graph representing . . .) and a callout (e.g., see Figure 1) in the manuscript; image files downloaded from the Internet or screenshots taken from the Internet or from proprietary software must have written permission for reproduction from the copyright owner if protected by copyright; authors are responsible for obtaining this permission. The image permission form is available upon request.
    • Tables should be designed as simple grids, free of all but basic formatting; tables need to have a descriptive title (e.g., Table 2. Publisher titles classified by . . .) and a callout (e.g., see Table 2).
    • First-level headings are bold; second-level headings are bold italics; third-level headings are italic.
    • Numbers: write out numbers one to ninety-nine except for percentages (24 per cent), units of measure (8 kilograms), money ($100 USD), and numbers in figures and tables. Use numerals for all numbers 100 and higher.
    • Use single quotation marks; only use double marks for quotes ‘inside’ other quotes: e.g., The author instructions say, ‘use double marks for quotes “inside” other quotes.’
    • Spelling follows the Canadian Oxford Dictionary; hyphenation follows the Concise Oxford Dictionary.

    Endnote References

    • JSP uses ‘notes’ style from the Chicago Manual of Style, 17th ed. (see chap. 14). Unlike APA or MLA style, which must provide some bibliographic information inside parentheses in the body of the text (author last name, publication date, or page number), Chicago notes provide the bibliographic information in the endnotes, each matched to a superscript number in the text.
    • Do not insert references using software such as EndNote, which adds a layer of embedded coding to the manuscript; use only MS Word’s built-in endnote function to insert references.
    • Use a shortened citation to cite a reference again that has already been cited once in full. A shortened citation includes only author(s) last name, abbreviated title, and page number(s) [optional: page number needed only when note refers to particular page(s)].

    Example of a shortened citation:

    Full citation

    1 Ann Denver and Frank C. Post, ‘Models for Open Access Publishing: The Virtues of Gold and Green Considered,’ Journal of Scholarly Publishing 45, no. 2 (2013): 114–25.

    Shortened citation

    2 Denver and Post, ‘Models for Open Access Publishing,’ 118.

    Endnote References continued, with examples by type of source

    Book

    3 John R. Lander and Geraldine Prow, Libraries through the Stacks, 2nd ed. (Waterloo, ON: Studious Press, 2016), 97, 101–3, 107.

    [A reference to the book as a whole would not need a page number at the end of the reference. But a reference that points to particular page(s) in the source (and this goes for any type of paginated source) ends with page number(s). If a reference refers to separate or discontinuous pages in a source, put commas between the page numbers.]

    Essay or chapter in an edited book

    4 Amy M. Merchant, ‘The Slow Evolution of Electronic Publishing,’ in Electronic Publishing: New Models and Opportunities, ed. April J. Meadows and Frank Rowland (Cheyenne, WY: Frontier College Publishing, 2001), 171–200.

    [The page numbers above are the inclusive range that corresponds to this chapter in the collection.]

    Journal article in print

    5 Edward Fraser Beschler, E. Lauren Carr, and Walter Hall, ‘A Commercial Publisher’s Point of View,’ Proceedings of Learned Societies International 45, no. 10 (1998): 101–17.

    Journal article online

    6 S. Marco Hitchcock Jr., ‘Web Journals Publishing: A UK Perspective,’ Serials Quarterly Online (November 2015), doi:10.1081/545507.

    [Volume and issue number and page numbers are useful to include when an online journal article has them (see print journal article example). No ‘accessed by’ date is needed before URL or DOI when there is a date of publication. URL can substitute for DOI.]

    Newspaper article

    7 Abigail N. Owens, ‘A High-Tech Rescue for Out-of-Print Books,’ New York Times, June 4, 1998.

    Magazine article

    8 Richard A. Melcher, ‘Dusting Off the Britannica,’ Book Trader, Fall 2007, 143, 145.

    Website, for a titled webpage or authored document

    9 Ad Hoc Committee for Digitization, ‘Preservation Strategies for Digital Archives,’ Association of Independent Libraries, accessed July 17, 2014, https://www.ail.org/home/index.

    [Add access date before the URL for an undated online source or one that has been or may be updated; “last modified” can substitute for “accessed” if the source specifies such a date.]

    Website, as a whole

    10 Association of Science Journalists Accreditation Program, http://www.asj/accrediationprogram.htm.

    Blog

    11 Gary Cleaves, ‘Diversifying One’s Publication Portfolio,’ Climbing the Ivied Walls (blog), August 5, 2015, http://www.huh.edu/faculty/backpages/8-5.

    Lecture or conference presentation

    12 Simone Carter, ‘Be “Stingy” with Commas’ (panel presentation, Annual Meeting of British Academic Publishers, Leeds, UK, March 2016).

    Message to an electronic mailing list

    13 Hermione Hopkins to L-LIBS listserv, April 23, 2014, http://listserv.adacam.org/script/wa.April.

    [A personal email is cited similarly: Hermione Hopkins, email message to author, April 23, 2014.]

  • Permission information

    Permissions Inquiries
    University of Toronto Press
    5201 Dufferin Street
    Toronto, ON M3H 5T8 Canada
    Tel: (416) 667–7777 ext. 7762
    Fax: (416) 667–7881
    Email: journal.permissions@utpress.utoronto.ca

  • Calls for papers

    Journal of Scholarly Publishing targets the unique issues facing the scholarly publishing industry today. It is the indispensable resource for academics and publishers that addresses the new challenges resulting from changes in technology, funding and innovations in publishing. In serving the wide-ranging interests of the international academic publishing community, JSP provides a balanced look at the issues and concerns, from solutions to everyday publishing problems to commentary on the philosophical questions at large.

    JSP welcomes cutting-edge articles and essays for consideration which address issues surrounding the publishing world in a time of great change. Materials for publication may be from either an academic or a practitioner perspective but should contribute to the current publishing debate. Submissions are accepted on a rolling basis.

    Please send submissions to the editors:
    Alex Holzman and Robert Brown
    jsp@utpress.utoronto.ca