Law's Indigenous Ethics

By John Borrows

© 2019

Law’s Indigenous Ethics examines the revitalization of Indigenous peoples’ relationship to their own laws and, in so doing, attempts to enrich Canadian constitutional law more generally. Organized around the seven Anishinaabe grandmother and grandfather teachings of love, truth, bravery, humility, wisdom, honesty, and respect, this book explores ethics in relation to Aboriginal issues including title, treaties, legal education, and residential schools.

With characteristic depth and sensitivity, John Borrows brings insights drawn from philosophy, law, and political science to bear on some of the most pressing issues that arise in contemplating the interaction between Canadian state law and Indigenous legal traditions. In the course of a wide-ranging but accessible inquiry, he discusses such topics as Indigenous agency, self-determination, legal pluralism, and power. In its use of Anishinaabe stories and methodologies drawn from the emerging field of Indigenous studies, Law’s Indigenous Ethics makes a significant contribution to scholarly debate and is an essential resource for readers seeking a deeper understanding of Indigenous rights, societies, and cultures.

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 392 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.5in x 1.3in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP005428

  • PUBLISHED APR 2019
    From: $39.95
    ISBN 9781487523558
  • PUBLISHED APR 2019

    From: $71.25

    Regular Price: $95.00

    ISBN 9781487504915
  • AVAILABLE MAY 2019
    From: $39.95

Quick Overview

Law's Indigenous Ethics seeks to strengthen the relationship between Indigenous rights and legal traditions by exploring a set of crucial topics through the lens of the seven Anishinaabe grandmother and grandfather teachings: love, truth, bravery, humility, wisdom, honesty, and respect.

Law's Indigenous Ethics

By John Borrows

© 2019

Law’s Indigenous Ethics examines the revitalization of Indigenous peoples’ relationship to their own laws and, in so doing, attempts to enrich Canadian constitutional law more generally. Organized around the seven Anishinaabe grandmother and grandfather teachings of love, truth, bravery, humility, wisdom, honesty, and respect, this book explores ethics in relation to Aboriginal issues including title, treaties, legal education, and residential schools.

With characteristic depth and sensitivity, John Borrows brings insights drawn from philosophy, law, and political science to bear on some of the most pressing issues that arise in contemplating the interaction between Canadian state law and Indigenous legal traditions. In the course of a wide-ranging but accessible inquiry, he discusses such topics as Indigenous agency, self-determination, legal pluralism, and power. In its use of Anishinaabe stories and methodologies drawn from the emerging field of Indigenous studies, Law’s Indigenous Ethics makes a significant contribution to scholarly debate and is an essential resource for readers seeking a deeper understanding of Indigenous rights, societies, and cultures.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 392 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.5in x 1.3in x 9.3in
  • Reviews

    "Law’s Indigenous Ethics addresses very controversial topics in Canada, not just in Indigenous legal studies, but far beyond that. John Borrows employs story work methodology, along with thorough legal research, ensuring that his work is truly leading edge. Law’s Indigenous Ethics will further advance Indigenous studies in Canada and beyond. Borrows’s work moves beyond the binary, divisive, and linear ideologies dominating the Indigenous intellectual landscape in Canada. He provides nuance, complicates dominate narratives, and gives the reader much food for thought and, more importantly, asks the reader to think, reflect, and embrace the principles embedded in the seven grandmother and grandfather teachings as a whole."


    Deborah McGregor, Osgoode Hall Law School, Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Environmental Justice, York University

    "Law’s Indigenous Ethics is extremely novel, important, and has the potential for great influence. Demonstrating tremendous expertise and fluency with its subjects, John Borrows’s arguments are sound and thoughtful, providing a number of important insights that lead me to adjust the way I think about issues that are very familiar to me."


    Bethany Berger, Wallace Stevens Professor of Law, University of Connecticut
  • Author Information

    John Borrows is Professor and Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Law at the University of Victoria Law School.
  • Table of contents

    Acknowledgements \

    Introduction: Niizhwaaswi-Miigiwewinan (Seven Gifts): Nokomis’ Constitution Nitam-Miigiwewin: Zaagidiwin (Gift 1: Love)

    1. Love: Law & Land in Canada’s Indigenous Constitution
    Niizho-Miigiwewin: Debwewin (Gift 2: Truth)

    2. Truth: Origin Stories, Metaphysics, and Law
    Niso-Miigiwewin: Zoongide’iwin (Gift 3: Bravery)

    3. Bravery: Challenging the Durability of Terra Nullius: Tsilhqot’in v. British Columbia
    Niiyo-Miigiwewin: Dabaadendizowin (Gift 4: Humility)

    4. Humility: Entanglement, Aboriginal Title and ‘Private’ Property
    Naano-Miigiwewin: Nibwaakaawin (Gift 5: Wisdom)

    5. Wisdom: Outsider Education and Indigenous Law
    Ningodwaaso-Miigiwewin: Gwayakwaadiziwin (Gift 6: Honesty)

    6. Honesty: Legal Education, and Heroes, Tricksters, Monsters and Caretakers
    Niizhwaaso-Miigewewin: Manaaji’idiwin (Gift 7: Respect)

    7. Respect: Residential Schools, Responsibilities for Past Harms

    Conclusion

    Nookomis’ Re-Constitution

    Endnotes