Lawyers and Legal Culture in British North America: Beamish Murdoch of Halifax

By Philip Girard

© 2011

From award-winning biographer Philip Girard, Lawyers and Legal Culture in British North America is the first history of the legal profession in Canada to emphasize its cross-provincial similarities and its deep roots in the colonial period. Girard details how nineteenth-century British North American lawyers created a distinctive Canadian template for the profession by combining the strong collective governance of the English tradition with the high degree of creativity and client responsiveness characteristic of U.S. lawyers — a mix that forms the basis of the legal profession in Canada today.

Girard provides a unique window on the interconnections between lawyers' roles as community leaders and as legal professionals. Centred on one pre-Confederation lawyer whose career epitomizes the trends of his day, Beamish Murdoch (1800-1876), Lawyers and Legal Culture in British North America makes an important and compelling contribution to Canadian legal history.

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Product Details

  • Series: Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 304 pages
  • Illustrations: 1
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 0.9in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP003248

  • PUBLISHED JUL 2011

    From: $50.25

    Regular Price: $67.00

    ISBN 9781442644106
  • PUBLISHED JUL 2011

    From: $60.75

    Regular Price: $81.00

Quick Overview

Centred on one pre-Confederation lawyer whose career epitomizes the trends of his day, Beamish Murdoch (1800-1876), Lawyers and Legal Culture in British North America makes an important and compelling contribution to Canadian legal history.

Lawyers and Legal Culture in British North America: Beamish Murdoch of Halifax

By Philip Girard

© 2011

From award-winning biographer Philip Girard, Lawyers and Legal Culture in British North America is the first history of the legal profession in Canada to emphasize its cross-provincial similarities and its deep roots in the colonial period. Girard details how nineteenth-century British North American lawyers created a distinctive Canadian template for the profession by combining the strong collective governance of the English tradition with the high degree of creativity and client responsiveness characteristic of U.S. lawyers — a mix that forms the basis of the legal profession in Canada today.

Girard provides a unique window on the interconnections between lawyers' roles as community leaders and as legal professionals. Centred on one pre-Confederation lawyer whose career epitomizes the trends of his day, Beamish Murdoch (1800-1876), Lawyers and Legal Culture in British North America makes an important and compelling contribution to Canadian legal history.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 304 pages
  • Illustrations: 1
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 0.9in x 9.3in
  • Author Information

    Philip Girard is a professor at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University.
  • Table of contents

    I Introduction

    II Antecedents

    III Apprenticeship

    IV The Legal Profession in Nova Scotia:  Organization and Mobility

    V The Making of a Colonial Lawyer, 1822-1827

    VI The Maturing of a Colonial Lawyer, 1828-1850

    VII The Politics of a Colonial Lawyer:  Murdoch, Howe, and Responsible Government   

    VIII Law and Politics in the Colonial City:  Murdoch as Recorder of Halifax, 1850-1860

    IX Law, Identity and Improvement:  Murdoch as Cultural Producer

    X Epilogue

    XI Conclusion

    Appendix A

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