Living with Strangers: The Nineteenth-Century Sioux and the Canadian-American Borderlands

David G. McCrady

© 2009

Now in paperback, Living with Strangers tells the story of the Sioux who moved into the Canadian-American borderlands in the later years of the nineteenth century. David G. McCrady's award-winning study crosses national boundaries to examine how Native peoples on both sides of the border reacted to the arrival of the Sioux. Using material from archives across North America, including Canadian and American government documents, Lakota winter counts, and oral histories, McCrady reveals that the nineteenth-century Sioux acted with spirited self-interest across the Canadian-American border.

The Sioux's shifting tactical use of the Canada-United States boundary helped them to create cross-border trading competitions, to open negotiations with both governments to determine which country would accord them better treatment, and to use the border as a shield in times of war with the United States. Living with Strangers takes readers beyond the traditional dichotomy of the Canadian and the American West to reveal significant and previously unknown strands in Sioux history.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 200 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.6in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP002762

  • PUBLISHED NOV 2009

    From: $20.96

    Regular Price: $27.95

    ISBN 9781442609907

Quick Overview

Living with Strangers tells the story of the Sioux who moved into the Canadian-American borderlands in the later years of the nineteenth century. David G. McCrady's award-winning study crosses national boundaries to examine how Native peoples on both sides of the border reacted to the arrival of the Sioux.

Living with Strangers: The Nineteenth-Century Sioux and the Canadian-American Borderlands

David G. McCrady

© 2009

Now in paperback, Living with Strangers tells the story of the Sioux who moved into the Canadian-American borderlands in the later years of the nineteenth century. David G. McCrady's award-winning study crosses national boundaries to examine how Native peoples on both sides of the border reacted to the arrival of the Sioux. Using material from archives across North America, including Canadian and American government documents, Lakota winter counts, and oral histories, McCrady reveals that the nineteenth-century Sioux acted with spirited self-interest across the Canadian-American border.

The Sioux's shifting tactical use of the Canada-United States boundary helped them to create cross-border trading competitions, to open negotiations with both governments to determine which country would accord them better treatment, and to use the border as a shield in times of war with the United States. Living with Strangers takes readers beyond the traditional dichotomy of the Canadian and the American West to reveal significant and previously unknown strands in Sioux history.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 200 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.6in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    'In this intensively researched and tightly executed book, David McCrady illuminates important aspects of the much-neglected history of Sioux people living in the Canadian-American borderlands in the late-nineteenth century ... Living With Strangers not only makes a valuable contribution to the literature on the Sioux, it challenges all historians of North America to overcome the limitations of remaining on one side of the continent's national borders.'


    Jeffrey Ostler, Western Historical Quarterly

    'There is much to compliment in Living with Strangers. It shifts the historical border focus from Canada-United States national studies by uncovering northern Sioux border history and explaining tribal relationship with the international boundary.'


    Richmond L. Clow, Journal of American History

    'Living with Strangers serves as a valuable corrective lens to the national blinkers that limit some historians' vision. It suggests the need for further studies of Native peoples divided by European-imposed boundaries in North America and on other continents.'


    William A. Dobak, American Indian Culture and Research Journal

    'This [book] will work well for courses on the Northern Plains, the North American West, and Native American/First Nations history. Especially useful for class settings will be the introductory and concluding chapters that spell out reasons to study comparative and transnational history ... [Living with Strangers] presents a deep sense of place and adds significantly to historians' growing understanding of the borderlands of the American and Canadian Wests.'


    Sterling Evans, American Historical Review
  • Author Information

    David G. McCrady is an independent historian living in Winnipeg.

  • Table of contents

    CONTENTS

     List of Illustrationix
     Prefacexi
     A Note on Sioux
    Groups and Leaders
    xv
    1.Introduction:
    Partitioning Sioux History
    1
    2.From Contested Ground
    to Borderlands, 1752-1862
    8
    3.The Dakota Conflict of 1862
    and the Migration to the
    Plains Borderlands
    17
    4.The Migration of the Sioux
    to the Milk River Country
    31
    5.The Sioux, the Surveyors, and the
    North-West Mounted Police, 1872-1874
    49
    6.The Great Sioux War, 1876-187761
    7.The Lakotas and Métis
    atWood Mountain, 1876-1881
    76
    8.The Failure of Peace
    in Canada, 1878-1881
    86
    9.Overview: The Northern Borderlands103
     Notes115
     Bibliography145
     Index159

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