Mannerist Fiction: Pathologies of Space from Rabelais to Pynchon

By William Donoghue

© 2014

In Mannerist Fiction, William Donoghue re-conceptualizes the history of formalism in western literature. Rather than presuming that literary experimentation with form – distorting space and time – began in the twentieth century with Modernism, Donoghue identifies the age of Copernicus as the crucible for the first experiments in spatial de-formation, which appeared in mannerist painting and literature. With wide-ranging erudition, Mannerist Fiction connects these literary and pictorial developments and traces their repetition and evolution over the next five hundred years.

Time and again, Donoghue explains, scientific and literary paradigm shifts have occurred in parallel. Rabelais and Jonson wrote in the aftermath of changes in the western sense of space wrought by Copernicus and the voyages of discovery, Jonathan Swift and the Marquis de Sade in the age of Newton, Thomas Pynchon in the age of Einstein. With his analysis, Donoghue establishes disfigurement and deformation as perennial sources of literary fascination.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 200 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.4in x 0.8in x 9.3in
Product Formats

SaveUP TO 9239

Book Formats

SKU# SP003779

  • PUBLISHED APR 2014

    From: $43.50

    Regular Price: $58.00

    ISBN 9781442648012
  • PUBLISHED MAR 2014

    From: $43.50

    Regular Price: $58.00

Quick Overview

In Mannerist Fiction, William Donoghue re-conceptualizes the history of formalism in western literature.

Mannerist Fiction: Pathologies of Space from Rabelais to Pynchon

By William Donoghue

© 2014

In Mannerist Fiction, William Donoghue re-conceptualizes the history of formalism in western literature. Rather than presuming that literary experimentation with form – distorting space and time – began in the twentieth century with Modernism, Donoghue identifies the age of Copernicus as the crucible for the first experiments in spatial de-formation, which appeared in mannerist painting and literature. With wide-ranging erudition, Mannerist Fiction connects these literary and pictorial developments and traces their repetition and evolution over the next five hundred years.

Time and again, Donoghue explains, scientific and literary paradigm shifts have occurred in parallel. Rabelais and Jonson wrote in the aftermath of changes in the western sense of space wrought by Copernicus and the voyages of discovery, Jonathan Swift and the Marquis de Sade in the age of Newton, Thomas Pynchon in the age of Einstein. With his analysis, Donoghue establishes disfigurement and deformation as perennial sources of literary fascination.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 200 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.4in x 0.8in x 9.3in
  • Reviews

    ‘Donoghue takes his readers on a vast tour that is sure to expose them to things they have never before contemplated in light of "mannerist" invention.’


    Jesse Wolfe
    Kritikon Litterarum vol 44:1-2:2017

    “There is a lot to like about William Donoghue’s Mannerist Fiction. The organizing theme is original and convincing, the readings of fiction in the context of the history of science are strong, and the book contains some wonderful surprises.”


    Michael D. Bristol, Greenshields Professor Emeritus in English Literature, McGill University

    Mannerist Fiction is an impressive piece of literary scholarship. William Donoghue displays a remarkably wide-ranging erudition, and his readings are deeply engaged, provocative, and even paradigm-bending in their own right.”


    David Porter, Department of English Language and Literature, University of Michigan
  • Author Information

    William Donoghue is an associate professor in the Writing, Literature, and Publishing Department at Emerson College.
  • Table of contents

    Introduction

    Part 1 – Big People and Little People: Two Cases of Disproportion

    Chapter 1 – Rabelais and Mannerism

    Chapter 2 – Swift and Commensuratio

    Part 2 – Pathologies of Deformation: Jonson, Sade, Pynchon

    Chapter 3 – Narcissism: Jonson and the Disfigured Self

    Chapter 4 – Sade and the Deformed Body

    Chapter 5 – Hysteria: Pynchon’s Cartoon Space

    Part 3 – Back to the Future: From Picasso to Aristotle

    Chapter 6 – Modernism and Mannerism

    Chapter 7 – Space and Time for the Ancients

    Notes

    Bibliography

    Index