Negotiating the Deal: Comprehensive Land Claims Agreements in Canada

By Christopher Alcantara

© 2013

This book provides the first systematic and comprehensive analysis of the factors that explain both completed and incomplete treaty negotiations between Aboriginal groups and the federal, provincial, and territorial governments of Canada. Since 1973, groups that have never signed treaties with the Crown have been invited to negotiate what the government calls “comprehensive land claims agreements,” otherwise known as modern treaties, which formally transfer jurisdiction, ownership, and title over selected lands to Aboriginal signatories. Despite their importance, not all groups have completed such agreements – a situation that is problematic not only for governments but for Aboriginal groups interested in rebuilding their communities and economies.

Using in-depth interviews with Indigenous, federal, provincial, and territorial officials, Christopher Alcantara compares the experiences of four Aboriginal groups: the Kwanlin Dün First Nation (with a completed treaty) and the Kaska Nations (with incomplete negotiations) in Yukon Territory, and the Inuit (completed) and Innu (incomplete) in Newfoundland and Labrador. Based on the experiences of these groups, Alcantara argues that scholars and policymakers need to pay greater attention to the institutional framework governing treaty negotiations and, most importantly, to the active role that Aboriginal groups play in these processes.

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 200 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.1in x 0.5in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP003383

  • PUBLISHED MAR 2013

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    Regular Price: $27.95

    ISBN 9781442612846
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    ISBN 9781442644779
  • PUBLISHED MAR 2013

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    Regular Price: $27.95

Quick Overview

This book provides the first systematic and comprehensive analysis of the factors that explain both completed and incomplete treaty negotiations between Aboriginal groups and the federal, provincial, and territorial governments of Canada.

Negotiating the Deal: Comprehensive Land Claims Agreements in Canada

By Christopher Alcantara

© 2013

This book provides the first systematic and comprehensive analysis of the factors that explain both completed and incomplete treaty negotiations between Aboriginal groups and the federal, provincial, and territorial governments of Canada. Since 1973, groups that have never signed treaties with the Crown have been invited to negotiate what the government calls “comprehensive land claims agreements,” otherwise known as modern treaties, which formally transfer jurisdiction, ownership, and title over selected lands to Aboriginal signatories. Despite their importance, not all groups have completed such agreements – a situation that is problematic not only for governments but for Aboriginal groups interested in rebuilding their communities and economies.

Using in-depth interviews with Indigenous, federal, provincial, and territorial officials, Christopher Alcantara compares the experiences of four Aboriginal groups: the Kwanlin Dün First Nation (with a completed treaty) and the Kaska Nations (with incomplete negotiations) in Yukon Territory, and the Inuit (completed) and Innu (incomplete) in Newfoundland and Labrador. Based on the experiences of these groups, Alcantara argues that scholars and policymakers need to pay greater attention to the institutional framework governing treaty negotiations and, most importantly, to the active role that Aboriginal groups play in these processes.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 200 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.1in x 0.5in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "Filling an important gap in both theoretical studies and practical knowledge, Negotiating the Deal is a significant work. It will make a lasting contribution to the literature on land claims, Aboriginal issues generally, and the Canadian political process."
    Kathy L. Brock, School of Policy Studies, Queen’s University
  • Author Information

    Christopher Alcantara is an associate professor in the Department of Political Science at Western University.

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