Printed Voices: The Renaissance Culture of Dialogue

By Dorothea Heitsch and Jean-Francois Vallee

© 2004

Prevalent but long-neglected genres such as dialogue have recently been attracting attention in Renaissance studies. In view of the pervasive and varied nature of this genre's use in the European Renaissance, it has become crucial to widen the perspective so as to take into account more diverse approaches to this hybrid form. For this reason, Dorothea Heitsch and Jean-François Vallée have assembled a broad collection of essays by international scholars that presents comparative, interdisciplinary, and theoretical inquiry into this neglected area.

The contributors – who bring with them different linguistic, cultural, and disciplinary backgrounds – examine dialogue from a variety of perspectives, taking into account various factors linked to the upsurge of the genre in the Renaissance. These factors include the emergence of a complex and multifarious subjectivity, the advent of modern utopias, the social and political importance of courtliness, the rise of print culture, religious and scientific controversy, the prevalence of pedagogy and rhetorical culture, the ethos of humanism, the gendering of dialogue, and Renaissance 'logocentrism.' Discussed are some of the most important works in Italian, French, German, Neo-Latin, and English, as well as some lesser known texts, making Printed Voices a truly essential volume for the Renaissance scholar.

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 280 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.2in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP002067

  • PUBLISHED OCT 2004

    From: $63.00

    Regular Price: $84.00

    ISBN 9780802087065
  • PUBLISHED OCT 2004

    From: $72.75

    Regular Price: $97.00

Quick Overview

Discussed are some of the most important works in Italian, French, German, Neo-Latin, and English, as well as some lesser known texts, making Printed Voices a truly essential volume for the Renaissance scholar.

Printed Voices: The Renaissance Culture of Dialogue

By Dorothea Heitsch and Jean-Francois Vallee

© 2004

Prevalent but long-neglected genres such as dialogue have recently been attracting attention in Renaissance studies. In view of the pervasive and varied nature of this genre's use in the European Renaissance, it has become crucial to widen the perspective so as to take into account more diverse approaches to this hybrid form. For this reason, Dorothea Heitsch and Jean-François Vallée have assembled a broad collection of essays by international scholars that presents comparative, interdisciplinary, and theoretical inquiry into this neglected area.

The contributors – who bring with them different linguistic, cultural, and disciplinary backgrounds – examine dialogue from a variety of perspectives, taking into account various factors linked to the upsurge of the genre in the Renaissance. These factors include the emergence of a complex and multifarious subjectivity, the advent of modern utopias, the social and political importance of courtliness, the rise of print culture, religious and scientific controversy, the prevalence of pedagogy and rhetorical culture, the ethos of humanism, the gendering of dialogue, and Renaissance 'logocentrism.' Discussed are some of the most important works in Italian, French, German, Neo-Latin, and English, as well as some lesser known texts, making Printed Voices a truly essential volume for the Renaissance scholar.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 280 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.3in x 1.2in x 9.3in
  • Author Information

    Dorothea Heitsch is an assistant professor in the Department of Modern Languages at Shippenburg University.



    Jean-François Vallée teaches at Collège de Maisonneuve and is a postdoctoral fellow at l’Université de Montréal.

  • Table of contents

    Foreword - Dorothea Heitsch and Jean-François Vallée

    Part One: The Fate of Dialogue
    1. Problematizing Exemplarity: The Inward Turn of Dialogue from Bruni to Montaigne. François Rigolot (Princeton University)
    Part Two: The Utopia of Dialogue
    1. Dialogue, Utopia, and the Agencies of Fiction. Nina Chordas (University of Alaska Southeast, Juneau)
    2. The Fellowship of the Book, Printed Voices and Written Friendships in More's Utopia. Jean-François Vallée (Collège de Maisonneuve, Montreal)
    3. Thomas More's Utopia and the Problem of Writing a Literary History of EnglishRenaissance Dialogue. Chris Warner (Kent State Uniersity – East Liverpool)
    Part Three: Dialogue and the Court
    1. The Development of Dialogue in Il libro del cortegiano: From the Manuscripts Drafts to the Definitive Version. Olga Pugliese (University of Toronto)
    2. Between the locus mendacii and the locus veritatis: Pietro Aretino's Ragionemento delle corti. Robert Buranello (Georgetown University)
    3. From Dialogue to Conversation: Marie de Gournay's Views on a Social Activity. Dorothea Heitsch (Shippensburg University)
    Part Four: Dialogues with History, Religion, and Science
    1. 'Truth Hath the Victory': Dialogue and Disputation in John Foxe's Acts and Monuments. Josef Puterbaugh (Independent Writer)
    2. Milton's Hence: Dialogue and the Shape of History in L'Allegro and Il Penseroso. W. Scott Howard (University of Denver)
    3. Hobbes, Rhetoric, and the Art of the Dialogue. Luc Borot (Université Paul Valéry, Montpellier)
    Part Five: The Purpose of Dialogue
    1. Francesco Barbaro'sDe Re Uxoria: A Silent Dialogue for a Young Medici Bride. Carole Collier Firck (Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville)
    2. Dialogue and German Language Learning in the Renaissance. Nicola McLelland (Trinity College, Dublin)
    Part Six: The Subject of Dialogue
    1. Renaissance Dialogue and Subjectivity. Eva Kushner (Victoria University, Toronto)

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