Queering Urban Justice: Queer of Colour Formations in Toronto

Edited by Jin Haritaworn, Ghaida Moussa, and Syrus Marcus Ware, with Río Rodríguez

© 2018

Queering Urban Justice foregrounds visions of urban justice that are critical of racial and colonial capitalism, and asks: What would it mean to map space in ways that address very real histories of displacement and erasure? What would it mean to regard Queer, Trans, Black, Indigenous, and People of Colour (QTBIPOC) as geographic subjects who model different ways of inhabiting and sharing space?

The volume describes city spaces as sites where bodies are exhaustively documented while others barely register as subjects. The editors and contributors interrogate the forces that have allowed QTBIPOC to be imagined as absent from the very spaces they have long invested in. From the violent displacement of poor, disabled, racialized, and sexualized bodies from Toronto’s gay village, to the erasure of queer racialized bodies in the academy, Queering Urban Justice offers new directions to all who are interested in acting on the intersections of social, racial, economic, urban, migrant, and disability justice.

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 240 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.5in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP005295

  • PUBLISHED JUN 2018

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    Regular Price: $24.95

    ISBN 9781487522858
  • PUBLISHED JUN 2018

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    ISBN 9781487503741
  • PUBLISHED AUG 2018

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    Regular Price: $24.95

Quick Overview

Queering Urban Justice foregrounds visions of urban justice that are critical of racial and colonial capitalism, and asks: What would it mean to map space in ways that address very real histories of displacement and erasure?

Queering Urban Justice: Queer of Colour Formations in Toronto

Edited by Jin Haritaworn, Ghaida Moussa, and Syrus Marcus Ware, with Río Rodríguez

© 2018

Queering Urban Justice foregrounds visions of urban justice that are critical of racial and colonial capitalism, and asks: What would it mean to map space in ways that address very real histories of displacement and erasure? What would it mean to regard Queer, Trans, Black, Indigenous, and People of Colour (QTBIPOC) as geographic subjects who model different ways of inhabiting and sharing space?

The volume describes city spaces as sites where bodies are exhaustively documented while others barely register as subjects. The editors and contributors interrogate the forces that have allowed QTBIPOC to be imagined as absent from the very spaces they have long invested in. From the violent displacement of poor, disabled, racialized, and sexualized bodies from Toronto’s gay village, to the erasure of queer racialized bodies in the academy, Queering Urban Justice offers new directions to all who are interested in acting on the intersections of social, racial, economic, urban, migrant, and disability justice.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 240 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.5in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "Expanding traditional queer and critical race studies towards a vital dialogue with urban cultural geographers, Queering Urban Justice presents powerful reflections that transgress national boundaries. Not only is this volume original and well written, it also responds to the lack of course literature regarding emerging communities of belonging. Queering Urban Justice is central for both undergraduate and post-graduate education in several fields, including, gender studies, queer studies, ethnic and racial studies, and urban studies."


    Diana Mulinari, Department of Gender Studies, Lund University

    "Queering Urban Justice is an intellectually astute and provocative collection of critical studies of difference. It brings together historical and contemporary investigations of sexual politics as they interlock with the dynamic conditions of indigeneity, racialization, heteropatriarchy, diaspora, and capitalism. By locating its analysis in Toronto, Queering Urban Justice offers a deeply focused perspective on local resistance. At the same time, the book connects with national and transnational vectors that link Toronto to other parts of the world, thereby revealing the city’s multi-dimensional influences of activist work."


    Roland Sintos Coloma, Division of Teacher Education, Wayne State University

    "Compellingly articulated, Queering Urban Justice collects and makes space for the memories, reflections, and activisms of subaltern communities on the urban landscape of our city. Queer and trans Toronto needs this book."


    Dina Georgis, Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto
  • Author Information

    Jin Haritaworn is an associate professor in the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University.


    Ghaida Moussa is a PhD Candidate in the Social and Political Thought Program at York University.


    Syrus Marcus Ware is a PhD Candidate in the Faculty of Environmental Studies at York University.


    Rio Rodriguez is a Toronto-based latinx queer educator working in queer, trans and POC communities.
  • Table of contents

    Acknowledgments

    Introduction: Queering Urban Justice
    JIN HARITAWORN, GHAIDA MOUSSA, RÍO RODRÍGUEZ, AND SYRUS MARCUS WARE

    Part One: Mapping Community

    1. "Our Study Is Sabotage": Queering Urban Justice, from Toronto to New York
    A ROUNDTABLE BY JIN HARITAWORN, WITH CHE GOSSETT, RÍO RODRÍGUEZ, AND SYRUS MARCUS WARE

    2. "We Had to Take Space, We Had to Create Space": Locating Queer of Colour Politics in 1980s Toronto
    JOHN PAUL CATUNGAL

    3. Má-ka Juk Yuh: A Genealogy of Black Queer Liveability in Toronto
    OMISOORE H. DRYDEN

    4. Diasporic Intimacies: Queer Filipinos/as and Canadian Imaginaries
    ROBERT DIAZ, MARISSA LARGO, AND FRITZ LUTHER PINO

    5. On "Gaymousness" and "Calling Out": Affect, Violence, and Humanity in Queer of Colour Politics
    MATTHEW CHIN

    Part Two: Cartographies of Resistance

    6. Calling a Shrimp a Shrimp: A Black Queer Intervention in Disability Studies
    NWADIOGO EJIOGU AND SYRUS MARCUS WARE

    7. Black Lives Matter Toronto Teach-In
    JANAYA KHAN AND LEROI NEWBOLD

    8. Black Picket Signs/White Picket Fences: Racism, Space, and Solidarity
    TARA ATLURI

    9. Becoming through Others: Western Queer Self-Fashioning and Solidarity with Queer Palestine
    NAYROUZ ABU HATOUM AND GHAIDA MOUSSA

    10. Compulsory Coming Out and Agentic Negotiations: Toronto QTPOC Narratives
    AZAR MASOUMI

    11. The Sacred Uprising: Indigenous Creative Activisms
    AN INTERVIEW WITH REBEKA TABOBONDUNG BY SYRUS MARCUS WARE

    Epilogue: Caressing in Small Spaces
    JIN HARITAWORN

    Contributors