Reading Archaeology: An Introduction

Edited by Robert J. Muckle

© 2007

Designed as a supplement to introductory texts in archaeology, Reading Archaeology offers selections from scholarly journals and books as well as from semi-scientific periodicals and the popular press. Readings are chosen based on their potential to stimulate student interest and introduce a diversity of archaeological literature in all its major forms.

Reading Archaeology pairs well with Muckle's core text, Introducing Archaeology, which uses the same thematic organization, but can easily be used with any other introductory archaeology text.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 366 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.9in x 0.9in x 9.0in
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SKU# HE000180

  • PUBLISHED AUG 2007

    From: $45.90

    Regular Price: $54.00

    ISBN 9781551118765

Quick Overview

"Not many archaeology books are as useful and well written, with both faculty and student in mind." - Mark Lewine, Cuyahoga Community College

Reading Archaeology: An Introduction

Edited by Robert J. Muckle

© 2007

Designed as a supplement to introductory texts in archaeology, Reading Archaeology offers selections from scholarly journals and books as well as from semi-scientific periodicals and the popular press. Readings are chosen based on their potential to stimulate student interest and introduce a diversity of archaeological literature in all its major forms.

Reading Archaeology pairs well with Muckle's core text, Introducing Archaeology, which uses the same thematic organization, but can easily be used with any other introductory archaeology text.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 366 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.9in x 0.9in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    This thoughtfully assembled collection of readings provides students with an accessible introduction to the intellectual richness of archaeology today. Brief introductions and study questions accompany each article providing excellent guidance to the reader.


    Michael Chazan, University of Toronto

    Reading Archaeology is so well conceived and constructed that it can stand alone as an effective source for understanding archaeology with both depth and breadth. Unlike most readers, or even many texts, Muckle provides an interesting historical development of the field in context with well-chosen illustrative readings. He offers a striking view of the great diversity in sub-field concentration, as well as contrasting perspectives involved in the discipline. I recommend this reader for optimal use with his new and equally outstanding text, Introducing Archaeology, which follows the same strong construction. However, I also plan to use its sound pedagogy as a teaching guide for new social science professors! Not many archaeology books are as useful and well written, with both faculty and student in mind.


    Mark Lewine, Cuyahoga Community College, and Carnegie Associate Professor of the Year, 2006
  • Author Information

    Robert J. Muckle is Professor of Anthropology at Capilano University.
  • Table of contents

    Preface

    Acknowledgements

    Introduction: Recognizing and Reading Archaeological Literature

    Part 1: Situating Archaeology: Past and Present

    ""Ethnical Periods""
    Lewis Henry Morgan
     

    ""The Curse of the Curse of the Pharoahs""
    David Silverman

    ""From Theory to Theme Parks and the Man on the Moon: Archaeology in Contemporary Academia, Industry, and Popular Culture""
    Robert J. Muckle

    ""Garbology: The Archaeology of Fresh Garbage""
    W.L. Rathje

    ""Using the Past to Protect the Future: Marking Nuclear Waste Disposal Sites""
    Maureen F. Kaplan and Mel Adams 

    ""Identifying Victims after a Disaster""
    Dick Gould

    ""The Craft of Archaeology""
    Michael Shanks and Randall H. McGuire

    Part 2: Ethics, Legislation, and Intellectual Property Rights

    ""Private Property—National Legacy""
    Mark Michel 

    ""Can You Dig It? The Growing Importance of Ethical Considerations is Transforming Archaeology""   
    Anonymous

    ""Society for American Archaeology Principles of Archaeological Ethics""
    Society for American Archaeology  

    ""Copyrighting the Past? Emerging Intellectual Property Rights Issues in Archaeology""
    George P. Nicholas and Kelly P. Bannister

    Part 3: Working in the Field and Laboratory 

    ""Historical Archaeology Methods: Much More Than Digging with Small Tools""
    Kelly J. Dixon

    ""Looking for Sites in All the Right Places""
    Ronald D. Lippi

    ""Studying Archaeological Fieldwork in the Field: Views from Monte Polizzo""
    Cornelius Holtorf

    ""Notes on the Life History of a Pot Sherd""
    Cornelius Holtorf

    ""Microwear Polishes on Early Stone Tools from Koobi Fora, Kenya""
    Lawrence H. Keeley and Nicholas Toth

    ""Pottery and Its History""
    Prudence M. Rice

    Part 4: Reconstructing Culture History and Past Lifeways 

    ""Chronology and the Human Narrative""
    J.A.J. Gowlett

    ""Archaeology and Age of a New Hominin from Flores in Eastern Indonesia""
    M.J. Morwood et al.  

    ""Gender in Inuit Burial Practices""
    Barbara A. Crass

    ""Women and Men at Catalhoyuk""
    Ian Hodder

    ""African American Ethnicity""
    Timothy Baumann

    ""Pirate Imagery""
    Lawrence E. Babits, Joshua B. Howard, and Matthew Brenckle

    ""The Archaeology of Religion""
    Colin Renfrew

    Part 5: Explaining Things of Archaeological Interest

    ""The Epistemology of Archaeology""
    Peter Kosso

    ""The Ancient Maya and the Political Present""
    Richard R. Wilk

    ""War in the Southwest, War in the World""
    Steven H. Lekson

    ""Were Luxury Foods the First Domesticates? Ethnoarchaeological Perspectives from Southeast Asia""
    Brian Hayden

    ""The Maya Collapses""
    Jared Diamond

    Appendix: Periodicals of Interest to Archaeologists

    Sources

    "

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