Remembering Mass Violence: Oral History, New Media and Performance

Edited by Steven High, Edward Little, and Thi Ry Duong

© 2013

Remembering Mass Violence breaks new ground in oral history, new media, and performance studies by exploring what is at stake when we attempt to represent war, genocide, and other violations of human rights in a variety of creative works. A model of community-university collaboration, it includes contributions from scholars in a wide range of disciplines, survivors of mass violence, and performers and artists who have created works based on these events.

This anthology is global in focus, with essays on Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and North America. At its core is a productive tension between public and private memory, a dialogue between autobiography and biography, and between individual experience and societal transformation. Remembering Mass Violence will appeal to oral historians, digital practitioners and performance-based artists around the world, as well researchers and activists involved in human rights research, migration studies, and genocide studies.

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 376 pages
  • Illustrations: 19
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.9in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP003630

  • PUBLISHED JAN 2014

    From: $27.71

    Regular Price: $36.95

    ISBN 9781442614659
  • PUBLISHED JAN 2014

    From: $61.50

    Regular Price: $82.00

    ISBN 9781442646803
  • PUBLISHED FEB 2014

    From: $27.71

    Regular Price: $36.95

Quick Overview

Remembering Mass Violence breaks new ground in oral history, new media, and performance studies by exploring what is at stake when we attempt to represent war, genocide, and other violations of human rights in a variety of creative works.

Remembering Mass Violence: Oral History, New Media and Performance

Edited by Steven High, Edward Little, and Thi Ry Duong

© 2013

Remembering Mass Violence breaks new ground in oral history, new media, and performance studies by exploring what is at stake when we attempt to represent war, genocide, and other violations of human rights in a variety of creative works. A model of community-university collaboration, it includes contributions from scholars in a wide range of disciplines, survivors of mass violence, and performers and artists who have created works based on these events.

This anthology is global in focus, with essays on Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America, and North America. At its core is a productive tension between public and private memory, a dialogue between autobiography and biography, and between individual experience and societal transformation. Remembering Mass Violence will appeal to oral historians, digital practitioners and performance-based artists around the world, as well researchers and activists involved in human rights research, migration studies, and genocide studies.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 376 pages
  • Illustrations: 19
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.9in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    Remembering Mass Violence weaves together a diverse and fascinating series of narratives, be they academic, creative, or witness accounts, while also highlighting media-enhanced and art-inspired appropriations and interpretations of trauma testimonies.”


    Natalia Khanenko-Friesen, Department of Religion and Culture, St Thomas More College, University of Saskatchewan

    “This is an innovative, interesting project. The investments of each of the authors are admirable; their concerns are important. Drawing on ‘new media’ and other innovative art forms, the contributors bridge personal memory, public knowledge, and history.”


    Pamela Sugiman, Department of Sociology, Ryerson University
  • Author Information

    Steven High is professor of History at Concordia University and co-founder of the Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling.


    Edward Little is a professor in the Department of Theatre at Concordia University.


    Thi Ry Duong is the coordinator of the Cambodian Working Group with the Montreal Life Stories Project.
  • Table of contents

    INTRODUCTION. Edward Little (Concordia University, Theatre) and Steven High (Concordia University, History)

    I Turning Private History into Public Knowledge

    Chapter 1. Voices, Places and Spaces. Henry Greenspan (University of Michigan, Social Psychology and Social Ethics)

    Chapter 2. So Far from Home. Lorne Shirinian (Royal Military College of Canada, Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature)

    II Performing Human Rights

    Chapter 3. Soldiers’ Tales Untold: Trauma, Narrative and Remembering through Performance. Michael Kilburn (Endicott College, Political Science)

    Chapter 4. Lamentations: A Gestural Theatre in the Realm of Shadows. Sandeep Bhagwati (Concordia University, Theatre and Music)

    Chapter 5. Turning Together: Playback Theatre, Oral History, and Arts-Based Research in the Montreal Life Stories Project. Nisha Sajnani (New York University, Drama Therapy), Alan Wong (Concordia University, Special Individualized Program), Warren Linds (Concordia University, Applied Human Sciences), Lisa Ndejuru (Concordia University, Special Individualized Program)

    Chapter 6. Stories Scorched From the Desert Sun: Performing Testimony, Narrating Process. Hourig Attarian (Concordia University, Centre for Oral History and Digital Storytelling) and Rachael Van Fossen (Concordia University, Theatre)

    III Oral History and Digital Media

    Chapter 7. Oral History in the Age of Social Media Networks: Life Stories on CitizenShift and Parole Citoyenne. Reisa Levine (The Banff Centre, Arts)

    Chapter 8. Co-Creating Our Story: Making a Documentary Film. Noelia Gravotta (Life in the Open Prison) and Megan Webster (Life in the Open Prison)

    Chapter 9. Connecting the Dots: Memory, Multimedia and Community Information Integration in Northern Uganda. Jessica Anderson (George Washington University, Political Science) and Rachel Bergenfield (Yale University, International Relations)

    Chapter 10. Arrival Stories: Using Media to Create Connections in a Refugee Residence. Michele Luchs (Ministry of Education) and Liz Miller (Concordia University, Communications)

    IV Life Stories

    Chapter 11. “So you want to hear our ghetto stories?”: Oral History at Ndinawe Youth Resource Centre. Robin Jarvis Brownlie (University of Manitoba, History) and Roewan Crowe (University of Winnipeg, Women’s and Gender Studies)

    Chapter 12. Dishonour, Dispersion, and Dispossession: Race and Rights in 21st-Century North America—A View from the Lower Ninth Ward. D’Ann Penner (University of California at Berkeley, History)

    Chapter 13. The Romance of Reminiscence: Problems Posed in Life Histories with Activist Pensioners in Argentina. Lindsay DuBois (Dalhousie University, Sociology and Social Anthropology)

    Chapter 14. Mémoires des Migrations de juifs marocains à Montréal. Yolande Cohen (Université du Québec à Montréal, History)

    V Rwanda in the Aftermath of Genocide

    Chapter 15. Viols des femmes Tutsi pendant le génocide: témoignage de Mme Athanasie. Athanasie Mukarwego (Village of Hope)

    Chapter 16. Les viols pendant le génocide des Tutsi: un crime d’envie. Emmanuel Habimana (The Children Who Lived), Carole Vacher (Montreal Life Stories), Berthe Kayitesi (University of Ottawa) and Callixte Kabayiza (Rwanda Working Group)

    Chapter 17. Hearing the Untold Story: Documenting LGBTI Lives in Rwanda. Valerie Love (Human Rights Collections at University of Connecticut Thomas J. Dodd Research Center)

    AFTERWORD. Thi Ry Duong (Montreal Life Stories)

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