Sarra Copia Sulam: A Jewish Salonnière and the Press in Counter-Reformation Venice

By Lynn Lara Westwater

© 2020

For nearly a decade at the height of the Counter-Reformation in Italy, the Jewish poet and polemicist Sarra Copia Sulam (ca. 1592–1641) held a literary salon at her house in the Venetian ghetto, providing one of the most public and enduring forums for Jewish-Christian interaction in early modern Venice. Though Copia Sulam gained fame for her erudition, built a powerful intellectual network, and published a work on the immortality of the soul, her career later foundered under the weight of slanderous charges against her sexual, professional, and religious integrity.

This first biography of Copia Sulam examines the explosive relationship between gender, religion, and the press in seventeenth-century Venice through a study of her literary career. The backdrop to this inquiry is Venice’s tumultuous religious, cultural, and political climate and the competitive world of its presses, where men and women, Christians and Jews, alternately collaborated and clashed as they sought to gain a foothold in the most prestigious publishing capital in Europe.

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Product Details

  • Series: Toronto Italian Studies
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 376 pages
  • Illustrations: 22
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP005697

  • AVAILABLE JAN 2020

    From: $63.75

    Regular Price: $85.00

    ISBN 9781487505837
  • AVAILABLE JAN 2020

    From: $63.75

    Regular Price: $85.00

Quick Overview

The first biography of the Jewish poet and polemicist Sarra Copia Sulam situates her in the tradition of women’s writing in Venice and explores her rise and fall as a public intellectual in the tumultuous world of the city’s presses.

Sarra Copia Sulam: A Jewish Salonnière and the Press in Counter-Reformation Venice

By Lynn Lara Westwater

© 2020

For nearly a decade at the height of the Counter-Reformation in Italy, the Jewish poet and polemicist Sarra Copia Sulam (ca. 1592–1641) held a literary salon at her house in the Venetian ghetto, providing one of the most public and enduring forums for Jewish-Christian interaction in early modern Venice. Though Copia Sulam gained fame for her erudition, built a powerful intellectual network, and published a work on the immortality of the soul, her career later foundered under the weight of slanderous charges against her sexual, professional, and religious integrity.

This first biography of Copia Sulam examines the explosive relationship between gender, religion, and the press in seventeenth-century Venice through a study of her literary career. The backdrop to this inquiry is Venice’s tumultuous religious, cultural, and political climate and the competitive world of its presses, where men and women, Christians and Jews, alternately collaborated and clashed as they sought to gain a foothold in the most prestigious publishing capital in Europe.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Toronto Italian Studies
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 376 pages
  • Illustrations: 22
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Lynn Lara Westwater is an associate professor of Italian in the Department of Romance, German and Slavic Languages and Literatures at The George Washington University.
  • Table of contents

    Acknowledgements
    Dramatis Personae
    Timeline
    Note on the Text

    Introduction

    1. The Birth of a Salon (1618–21)
    2. A Rupture in the Salon (1619–21)
    3. The Salon and the Venetian Presses (1621)
    4. Copia Sulam Compromised (1622–23)
    5. Friends and Enemies (1621–26)
    6. The Salon’s Afterlife (post 1626)

    Biographical Note
    Appendix
    Bibliography

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