Searching for Justice: An Autobiography

By Fred Kaufman

© 2005

The Honourable Fred Kaufman has been a distinguished figure in Canadian law for a half century. Born into a middle-class Jewish family in mid-1920s Vienna, Kaufman escaped to England on the eve of the Second World War. In 1940, he was interned as an 'enemy alien' and sent to Canada. Released in 1942, Kaufman stayed in Canada where he went on to university and law school in Montreal.

Kaufman was called to the Bar of Quebec in 1955 and practiced criminal law for eighteen years, taking part in many of the famous cases of that period. In 1960, he secured the release of a young Pierre Elliott Trudeau from prison, and in 1973, Trudeau returned the favour by personally informing Kaufman of his appointment to the Quebec Court of Appeal, where he served for eighteen years, including one as Acting Chief Justice of Quebec. Since his retirement in 1991, Kaufman has led numerous commissions and inquiries, most notably the investigation into the wrongful conviction of Guy Paul Morin and the two-year reassessment of the Steven Truscott case.

Searching for Justice is Kaufman's remarkable story in his own words. It is the tale of adversity overcome in a crucial period of Canadian legal history.

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Product Details

  • Series: Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 320 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 1.2in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP002248

  • PUBLISHED NOV 2005

    From: $64.50

    Regular Price: $86.00

    ISBN 9780802090515
  • PUBLISHED APR 2006

    From: $74.25

    Regular Price: $99.00

Quick Overview

Searching for Justice is Kaufman's remarkable story in his own words. It is the tale of adversity overcome in a crucial period of Canadian legal history.

Searching for Justice: An Autobiography

By Fred Kaufman

© 2005

The Honourable Fred Kaufman has been a distinguished figure in Canadian law for a half century. Born into a middle-class Jewish family in mid-1920s Vienna, Kaufman escaped to England on the eve of the Second World War. In 1940, he was interned as an 'enemy alien' and sent to Canada. Released in 1942, Kaufman stayed in Canada where he went on to university and law school in Montreal.

Kaufman was called to the Bar of Quebec in 1955 and practiced criminal law for eighteen years, taking part in many of the famous cases of that period. In 1960, he secured the release of a young Pierre Elliott Trudeau from prison, and in 1973, Trudeau returned the favour by personally informing Kaufman of his appointment to the Quebec Court of Appeal, where he served for eighteen years, including one as Acting Chief Justice of Quebec. Since his retirement in 1991, Kaufman has led numerous commissions and inquiries, most notably the investigation into the wrongful conviction of Guy Paul Morin and the two-year reassessment of the Steven Truscott case.

Searching for Justice is Kaufman's remarkable story in his own words. It is the tale of adversity overcome in a crucial period of Canadian legal history.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Osgoode Society for Canadian Legal History
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 320 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 1.2in x 9.3in
  • Author Information

    Fred Kaufman is a former justice of the Quebec Court of Appeal.

  • Table of contents

    foreword
    preface

    1 In the Beginning
    2 Safe Haven
    3 Guest of His Majesty
    4 Freedom Regained
    5 Newspaper Days
    6 The Asbestos Strike
    7 Law School
    8 A New Career
    9 Insanity and Other Matters
    10 A Future Prime Minister
    11 To Be Hanged by the Neck
    12 St Vincent de Paul
    13 Of Heart Transplants and Other Things
    14 The Tax That Wasn't
    15 The Computer Riot
    16 McGill Français
    17 Apprehended Insurrection
    18 The Art of Cross-Examination
    19 Some Personal Notes
    20 Politics
    21 The Bench
    22 Return to Practice
    23 Guy Paul Morin
    24 Nova Scotia
    25 Four More Investigations
    26 The Truscott Case
    epilogue
    notes
    index

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