Smart Globalization: The Canadian Business and Economic History Experience

Edited by Andrew Smith and Dimitry Anastakis

© 2014

Today's globalization debates pit neoliberals, who favour even deeper integration into the global economy, against neo-mercantilists, who call for a relatively selective approach to globalization and the return to more interventionist industrial policies. Both sides claim to have the facts on their side.

Inspired by the work of economists Ha-Joon Chang and Dani Rodrik, editors Andrew Smith and Dimitry Anastakis bring together essays from both historians and economists in this collection to test claims that wealth comes from either protectionism or free trade.

With empirical research that spans more than a century of Canadian history, Smart Globalization demonstrates that Canada’s success stemmed neither from complete openness to globalization or policies of isolation and self-sufficiency.

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 256 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.7in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP003776

  • PUBLISHED FEB 2014

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    Regular Price: $29.95

    ISBN 9781442616127
  • PUBLISHED FEB 2014

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    ISBN 9781442648043
  • PUBLISHED FEB 2014

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    Regular Price: $29.95

Quick Overview

Inspired by the work of economists Ha-Joon Chang and Dani Rodrik, editors Andrew Smith and Dimitry Anastakis bring together essays from both historians and economists in this collection to test claims that wealth comes from either protectionism or free trade.

Smart Globalization: The Canadian Business and Economic History Experience

Edited by Andrew Smith and Dimitry Anastakis

© 2014

Today's globalization debates pit neoliberals, who favour even deeper integration into the global economy, against neo-mercantilists, who call for a relatively selective approach to globalization and the return to more interventionist industrial policies. Both sides claim to have the facts on their side.

Inspired by the work of economists Ha-Joon Chang and Dani Rodrik, editors Andrew Smith and Dimitry Anastakis bring together essays from both historians and economists in this collection to test claims that wealth comes from either protectionism or free trade.

With empirical research that spans more than a century of Canadian history, Smart Globalization demonstrates that Canada’s success stemmed neither from complete openness to globalization or policies of isolation and self-sufficiency.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 256 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.7in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    ‘The editors and authors of Smart Globalization should be congratulated on a real contribution to the fields of both Canadian economics and history.’


    Mark Sholdice
    Canadian Historical Review vol 97:02:2016

    ‘This is a fascinating study of the approach taken to the international economy by decision makers in Canada …By bringing together essays from both historians and economists, editors Smith and Anastakis have given readers a set of studies that puts the Canadian case most instructively in the context of intelligent globalization… Highly recommended.’
    P.K. Kresl
    Choice vol 52:02:2014

    ‘This collection will be of interest to anyone interested in better understanding the historical complexities and contingencies of economic life in a globalizing world… Many scholars will find this book to be well worth a read.’


    Don Nerbas
    Labour/Le Travail, vol 76: Fall 2015

    "Smart Globalization offers an important starting point for Canadian historians to account for the steady march of openness rather than protectionism over the last century and half in Canada."


    Andrew Watson, University of Saskatchewan
    Canadian Business History Association Newlsetter, April 2018

    Smart Globalization is the first real Canadian analysis of selective globalization put into historical perspective. The theme of the book, that selective globalization works better, is one that is completely relevant and germane today. No other books address this particular subject the way these authors have done, as they begin to reclaim some of the field for those in Canada less enamoured of the effects of globalization.”


    Bruce Muirhead, Department of History, University of Waterloo

    “An important contribution to Canadian business and economic history.”


    Gregory P. Marchildon, Johnson-Shoyama Graduate School of Public Policy, University of Regina
  • Author Information

    Andrew Smith is a Lecturer in International Business at the University of Liverpool Management School.


    Dimitry Anastakis teaches Canadian history at Trent University. He has published seven monographs and collections, including Smart Globalization: The Canadian Business and Economic History Experience (2014) and the prize-winning Autonomous State: The Struggle for a Canadian Car Industry from OPEC to Free Trade (2013).
  • Table of contents

    Foreword – Joe Martin (University of Toronto, Rotman School of Management)

    Introduction – Andrew Smith (University of Liverpool, Management School) and Dimitry Anastakis (Trent University, History)

    Politics and Power in the British World: Ontario’s Hydro-Electric Policy, Canada and the City of London, 1905-1910 – Andrew Dilley (University of Aberdeen, History)

    “in the public interest to encourage the growth of this new industry”:  The Myth of Provincial Protectionism in Ontario’s Forest Industry, 1890-1930 – Mark Kuhlberg (Laurentian University, History)

    Managing a War Metal: The International Nickel Company’s First World War – Daryl White (Grande Prairie Regional College, History)

    Natural Resource Exports and Development in Settler Economies during the First Great Globalization Era:  Northwestern Ontario and South Australia, 1905-1915 – Livio Di Matteo (Lakehead University, Economics), J.C. Herbert Emery (University of Calgary, Economics) and Martin P. Shanahan ( University of South Australia, Dean of Research)

    Infant Industry Protection and the Growth of Canada’s Cotton Mills: A Test of the Chang Hypothesis – Michael Hinton (The Rimini Centre for Economic Analysis)      

    Imperialism, Continentalism and Multilateralism: The Making of a Modern Canadian Automotive Industry – Greig Mordue (Toyoto Canada, General Manager Corporate Planning and Communication)

    The Whisky Kings: The International Expansion of the Seagram Company 1933-1995 – Graham D. Taylor (Trent University, History)

    Am I Canadian? Globalization and the Canadian Brewing Industry since 1960 – Matthew J. Bellamy (Carleton University, History)