Social Theory, Volume I: From Classical to Modern Theory, Third Edition

Edited by Roberta Garner and Black Hawk Hancock

© 2014

The third edition of this popular reader reflects considerable changes. The framework for understanding theory as a set of conversations over time is maintained and deepened, pairing classical with contemporary readings to illustrate the ways in which theory continues to be reinterpreted over time. Volume I has been completely reorganized, with new contextual and biographical materials surrounding the primary readings, and end-of-chapter study guides that include key terms, discussion questions, and innovative classroom exercises. The result is a fresh and expansive take on social theory that foregrounds a plurality of perspectives and reflects contemporary trends in the field, while being an accessible and manageable teaching tool.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Page Count: 352 pages
  • Dimensions: 8.1in x 0.7in x 10.0in
Product Formats

SaveUP TO

Book Formats

SKU# HE000555

  • PUBLISHED MAY 2014
    From: $56.00
    ISBN 9781442607354
  • PUBLISHED MAY 2014
    From: $45.95

Quick Overview

This book is a fresh and expansive take on social theory that foregrounds a plurality of perspectives and reflects contemporary trends in the field, while being an accessible and manageable teaching tool.

Social Theory, Volume I: From Classical to Modern Theory, Third Edition

Edited by Roberta Garner and Black Hawk Hancock

© 2014

The third edition of this popular reader reflects considerable changes. The framework for understanding theory as a set of conversations over time is maintained and deepened, pairing classical with contemporary readings to illustrate the ways in which theory continues to be reinterpreted over time. Volume I has been completely reorganized, with new contextual and biographical materials surrounding the primary readings, and end-of-chapter study guides that include key terms, discussion questions, and innovative classroom exercises. The result is a fresh and expansive take on social theory that foregrounds a plurality of perspectives and reflects contemporary trends in the field, while being an accessible and manageable teaching tool.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Page Count: 352 pages
  • Dimensions: 8.1in x 0.7in x 10.0in
  • Reviews

    At a time when even some 'contemporary' theories are getting old, Garner and Hancock have given us something new: a reader that resists oversimplification and shows students the living relationships between classical and contemporary theory. The sheer number of authors presented here is impressive, and would be daunting if the organization of the book was not so ingenious. As a bonus, pedagogical materials at the end of each chapter help instructors to help their students become a part of these theoretical dialogues.
    David Yamane, Wake Forest University

    Garner and Hancock offer a selection of readings that are well chosen and wide reaching, providing theoretical materials which reflect the continuing relevance of the classics and the contemporary expansion of the discipline, but which also transcend strict disciplinary boundaries. Social Theory is an excellent resource for undergraduate and graduate instruction alike.
    Claire Laurier Decoteau, University of Illinois, Chicago

    Social Theory: A Reader is a sweeping review of sociological thought like no other.
    Jonathan R. Wynn, University of Massachusetts, Amherst

    This collection offers a dynamic juxtaposition of original text, biography, history, and practice-based exercises that allow readers to become apprentice-theorists, able to navigate the complex and contested meanings and mechanisms of society. Garner and Hancock's revised edition is an indispensable tool for teacher and student alike.
    Erin O'Connor, Marymount Manhattan College

    In this new edition, Garner and Hancock have established a forum for effective and productive learning, offering an exemplary balance between a comprehensive text that facilitates students' ability to read original statements, and a compendium of essential readings.
    Preston Rudy, San Jose State University
  • Author Information

    Roberta Garner is Professor of Sociology at DePaul University in Chicago. She is the author of The Joy of Stats: A Short Guide to Introductory Statistics in the Social Sciences, Second Edition (2010). She teaches courses on theory, research design, statistics, and Greek mythology.


    Black Hawk Hancock is Associate Professor of Sociology at DePaul University in Chicago. He is the co-author with Roberta Garner of Changing Theories: New Directions in Sociology (2009) and author of American Allegory: Lindy Hop and the Racial Imagination (2013).
  • Table of contents

    Preface
    Acknowledgments
    Reading Theory: A General Introduction

    Part I: Beginnings
    Introduction

    Chapter 1: Inventing the Lens
    Introduction
    1.1 Niccolo Machiavelli (1469-1527)
    Machiavelli's The Prince (1532)
    Reading 1.1: Excerpts from The Prince (1532)
    1.2 Irving M. Zeitlin (1928-), the Enlightenment, and the Conservative Reaction
    Reading 1.2: Excerpts from Ideology and the Development of Social Theory (1968)
    1.3 Edmund Burke (1729-1797)
    Burke's Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790)
    Reading 1.3: Excerpts from Reflections on the Revolution in France (1790)
    1.4 Immanuel Kant (1724-1804)
    Kant's "What is Enlightenment?" (1784)
    Reading 1.4: "What Is Enlightenment?" (1784)
    1.5 Friedrich Nietzsche (1844-1900)
    Nietzsche's On the Genealogy of Morals (1887)
    Reading 1.5: Excerpts from On the Genealogy of Morals (1887)
    1.6 A word about Auguste Comte (1798-1857)
    Suggested Readings
    Study Guide

    Part II: Classical Theory
    Introduction
    Suggested Readings: Part II

    Chapter 2: Marxist Theory
    2.1 Karl Marx (1818-1883) and Friedrich Engels (1820-1895)
    Marx and Engels on Capitalism and Communism: The Communist Manifesto (1848)
    Reading 2.1.1: Excerpts from The Communist Manifesto (1848)
    Marx and Engels on Ideas and Ideology: The German Ideology (written 1845-1846, published 1932)
    Reading 2.1.2: Excerpts from The German Ideology (written 1845-1846, published 1932)
    Marx's Early Writings: Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts (written 1844, published 1932)
    Reading 2.1.3: "Estranged Labour" from The Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts (written 1844, published 1932)
    Marx on Capitalism, Commodity Fetishism, and Machinery and Technology: Capital (1867)
    Reading 2.1.4: "The Fetishism of Commodities and the Secret Thereof" and "The Factory" from Capital (1867)
    2.2 The Legacy of Marx and Engels
    Stanley Aronowitz (1933-) and William DiFazio (1947-)
    Aronowitz and DiFazio's The Jobless Future (1994)
    Reading 2.2.1: Excerpts from The Jobless Future (1994)
    David Harvey (1935-)
    David Harvey's A Brief History of Neo-Liberalism (2005)
    Reading 2.2.2: "Why the Neoliberal Turn?" from A Brief History of Neo-Liberalism (2005)
    Suggested Readings
    Study Guide

    Chapter 3: The Social Theory of Emile Durkheim
    3.1 Emile Durkheim (1858-1917)
    Durkheim's Sociology: General Orientation, Early Works, and a Reflection on Crime—The Rules of Sociological Method (1895)
    Reading 3.1.1: The Rules of Sociological Method (1895)
    Durkheim's Suicide (1897) and the Concept of Anomie
    Reading 3.1.2: Excerpts from Suicide (1897)
    Durkheim's The Elementary Forms of Religious Life (1912) and the Social Production of Concepts
    Reading 3.1.3: Selection from the Conclusion of The Elementary Forms of Religious Life (1912)
    3.2 The Legacy of Durkheim
    Robert K. Merton (1910-2003)
    Merton's "Social Structure and Anomie" (1938)
    Reading 3.2: Merton's "Social Structure and Anomie" (1938)

    Suggested Readings
    Study Guide

    Chapter 4: The Social Theory of Max Weber
    Max Weber (1864-1920)
    Weber's Economy and Society: An Outline of Interpretive Sociology (1921-1922)
    Reading 4.1.1: Excerpts from Weber's Economy and Society: An Outline of Interpretive Sociology (1921-1922)
    Reading 4.1.2: Excerpt from "Science as a Vocation" (1919)
    4.2 The Legacy of Weber: George Ritzer and Theda Skocpol
    George Ritzer (1940-)
    Ritzer's The McDonaldization of Society (1993)
    Reading 4.2.1: Excerpts from George Ritzer's The McDonaldization of Society (1993)
    Theda Skocpol (1947-)
    Skocpol, Contemporary Political Life, and the Weberian Legacy
    Reading 4.2.2: Skocpol's "The Narrowing of Civic Life" (2004)
    Suggested Readings
    Study Guide

    Chapter 5: The Individual in Society: Simmel and Freud
    5.1 Georg Simmel (1858-1918)
    Simmel's Social Theory: The Philosophy of Money (1907) and "The Metropolis and Mental Life" (1903)
    Reading 5.1.1: "The Miser and the Spendthrift" from Simmel's The Philosophy of Money (1900)
    Reading 5.1.2: "The Metropolis and Mental Life" (1903)
    5.2 The Legacy of Simmel: David Riesman (1909-2002)
    Riesman's Analysis of an Emerging Character Type: The Lonely Crowd (1950)
    Reading 5.2: Excerpts from Riesman’s The Lonely Crowd (1950)
    5.3 Sigmund Freud (1856-1939)
    Freud on the Individual and Society: Introductory lectures on Psycho-Analysis (1915)
    Reading 5.3: Excerpts from Freud's Introductory lectures on Psycho-Analysis (1915)
    5.4 The Legacy of Freud: Juliet Mitchell and Others
    Freud's Legacy: Juliet Mitchell and Others
    Reading 5.4: Excerpts from Juliet Mitchell's Psychoanalysis and Feminism (1974)
    Suggested Readings
    Study Guide

    Part II: Questions and Exercises

    Part III: The Middle Years
    Introduction
    Suggested Readings: Part III

    Chapter 6: The American Emergence
    Introduction
    Charles Cooley (1864-1929) and George Herbert Mead (1863-1931)
    Cooley, Mead, and the Microsociological Tradition: Mead's Mind, Self, and Society (1934)
    Reading 6.1: Mead's Mind, Self, and Society (1934)
    6.2 The Legacy of Cooley and Mead: Patricia Adler (1951-) and Peter Adler (1951-)
    The Adlers and the Self in Society
    Reading 6.2: Patricia and Peter Adler's "The Gloried Self" (1989)
    6.3 W.E.B. Du Bois (1868-1983)
    The Social Theory of Du Bois: The Souls of Black Folk (1903)
    Reading 6.3.1: Du Bois's The Souls of Black Folk (1903)
    Reading 6.3.2: Du Bois's "The Souls of White Folk," Darkwater (1920)
    6.4 The Chicago School: St. Clair Drake (1911-1990) and Horace Cayton (1903-1970)
    The Chicago School and Drake and Cayton's The Black Metropolis (1945)
    Reading 6.4: Drake and Cayton's The Black Metropolis (1945)
    6.5 The Legacy of American Sociology: William Julius Wilson (1935-)
    Wilson's Analysis of Institutional Segregation and Joblessness: When Work Disappears (1996)
    Suggested Readings
    Study Guide

    Chapter 7: Reconstructed Marxism
    Introduction
    7.1 Walter Benjamin (1892-1940)
    Benjamin on Art and the Media: "The Work of Art in an Age of Mechanical Reproduction" (1936)
    Reading 7.1: Benjamin's "The Work of Art in an Age of Mechanical Reproduction" (1936)
    7.2 Adorno, Horkheimer, and Marcuse: Exiles in Paradise
    Adorno and Horkheimer's Critique of Culture: The Dialectic of Enlightenment (1944)
    Reading 7.2: Adorno and Horkheimer's "The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception" from The Dialectic of Enlightenment (1944)
    7.3 Antonio Gramsci (1891-1937)
    Gramsci's Analysis of Hegemony and the Formation of Intellectuals: The Prison Notebooks (written 1929-1935)
    Reading 7.3: Excerpts from Gramsci's Prison Notebooks (1929-1935)
    7.4 The Legacy of Gramsci: Jean Anyon (1941-2013)
    Gramsci's "Organizers of Society" and Anyon's "Executive Elite" Schools
    Reading 7.4: Anyon's "Social Class and the Hidden Curriculum of Work" (1980)
    Suggested Readings
    Study Guide

    Chapter 8: American Hegemony and Its Critics
    Introduction
    Structural Functionalism
    Conflict Theory
    Symbolic Interactionism

    8.1: Structural Functionalism: Talcott Parsons (1902-1979)
    Parsons and Structural-Functional Sociology
    Reading 8.1.1: Parsons's "An Outline of the Social System," from Theories of Society (1961)
    Parsons and the Sociology of Illness and Medicine
    Reading 8.1.2: Parsons's "Illness and the Role of the Physician" (1951)
    8.2 Conflict Theory: Critic of Hegemony C. Wright Mills (1916-1962)
    Mills and Conflict Theory: The Power Elite (1956)
    Reading 8.2: Mills's The Power Elite (1956)
    8.3 Symbolic Interactionism: An alternative to Structural Functionalism—Howard S. Becker (1928-)
    Symbolic Interactionism: The Social Theory of Howard S. Becker
    Reading 8.3: Excerpt from Becker's Outsiders (1963)
    8.4 Consumerism and "False Needs": The Critique of Modern Capitalist Culture—Herbert Marcuse (1898-1979)
    Marcuse's One Dimensional Man (1964)
    8.5 Structural Marxist Theory: Louis Althusser (1918-1990)
    Althusser and Structural Marxist Theory
    Reading 8.5: Excerpts from Althusser's "Ideology and Ideological State Apparatuses" (1970)

    Suggested Readings
    Study Guide

    Sources

By the Same Author(s)