Spenser's Famous Flight

By Patrick Cheney

© 1993

In Spenser's famous Flight, Patrick Cheney challenges the received wisdom about the shape and goal of Spenser's literary career. He contends that Spenser's idea of a literary career is not strictly the convential Virgilian pattern of pastoral to epic, but a Christian revision of that pattern in light of Petrarch and the Reformation.

Cheney demonstrates that, far from changing his mind about his career as a result of disillusionment, Spenser embarks upon and completes a daring progress that secures his status as an Orphic poet.

In October, Spenser calls his idea of a literary career the 'famous flight.' Both classical and Christian culture has authorized the myth of the winged poet as a primary myth of fame and glory. Cheney shows that throughout his poetry Spenser relies on an image of flight to accomplish his highest goal.

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Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 390 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP000417

  • PUBLISHED OCT 2017

    From: $29.96

    Regular Price: $39.95

    ISBN 9781487598181
  • PUBLISHED DEC 1993

    From: $63.00

    Regular Price: $84.00

    ISBN 9780802029348
  • PUBLISHED DEC 1993

    From: $31.46

    Regular Price: $41.95

Quick Overview

Cheney shows that throughout his poetry Spenser relies on an image of flight to accomplish his highest goal.

Spenser's Famous Flight

By Patrick Cheney

© 1993

In Spenser's famous Flight, Patrick Cheney challenges the received wisdom about the shape and goal of Spenser's literary career. He contends that Spenser's idea of a literary career is not strictly the convential Virgilian pattern of pastoral to epic, but a Christian revision of that pattern in light of Petrarch and the Reformation.

Cheney demonstrates that, far from changing his mind about his career as a result of disillusionment, Spenser embarks upon and completes a daring progress that secures his status as an Orphic poet.

In October, Spenser calls his idea of a literary career the 'famous flight.' Both classical and Christian culture has authorized the myth of the winged poet as a primary myth of fame and glory. Cheney shows that throughout his poetry Spenser relies on an image of flight to accomplish his highest goal.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Heritage
  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 390 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in

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