The Idea of a Colony: Cross-culturalism in Modern Poetry

By Edward Marx

© 2004

In The Idea of a Colony, Edward Marx provides a comprehensive approach to the question of cross-culturalism in modern poetry. He situates the work of canonical British and American modernist poets - Eliot, Pound, Stevens, Brooke, Kipling, and Flecker - in dialogue with the work of non-Western, colonial, and minority poets - Tagore, Naidu, Violet Nicolson - and brings into the discussion the poets of the Harlem Renaissance.

Drawing on psychological and cultural theory, Marx argues that primitivism and exoticism were the main forms of cross-culturalism in the modern period, and that these forms were organized around repression of the unconscious and irrational. To the psychological scene of the primitive/exotic poem and its reception, which is explored through substantial archival research, Marx brings an array of approaches including the theories of Freud, Jung, Lacan, Said, Foucault, Bhabha, Fanon, and others. The result is a series of powerful new readings of canonical modernists and a welcome expansion of the field of modern poetry into the age of multiculturalism and postcoloniality.

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Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 260 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 0.9in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP002119

  • PUBLISHED JUN 2004

    From: $50.25

    Regular Price: $67.00

    ISBN 9780802087997
  • PUBLISHED JUN 2004

    From: $58.50

    Regular Price: $78.00

Quick Overview

To the psychological scene of the primitive/exotic poem and its reception, which is explored through substantial archival research, Marx brings an array of approaches including the theories of Freud, Jung, Lacan, Said, Foucault, Bhabha, Fanon, and others.

The Idea of a Colony: Cross-culturalism in Modern Poetry

By Edward Marx

© 2004

In The Idea of a Colony, Edward Marx provides a comprehensive approach to the question of cross-culturalism in modern poetry. He situates the work of canonical British and American modernist poets - Eliot, Pound, Stevens, Brooke, Kipling, and Flecker - in dialogue with the work of non-Western, colonial, and minority poets - Tagore, Naidu, Violet Nicolson - and brings into the discussion the poets of the Harlem Renaissance.

Drawing on psychological and cultural theory, Marx argues that primitivism and exoticism were the main forms of cross-culturalism in the modern period, and that these forms were organized around repression of the unconscious and irrational. To the psychological scene of the primitive/exotic poem and its reception, which is explored through substantial archival research, Marx brings an array of approaches including the theories of Freud, Jung, Lacan, Said, Foucault, Bhabha, Fanon, and others. The result is a series of powerful new readings of canonical modernists and a welcome expansion of the field of modern poetry into the age of multiculturalism and postcoloniality.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Division: Scholarly Publishing
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 260 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 0.9in x 9.3in
  • Author Information

    Edward Marx is an independent scholar who has taught literature at the City University of New York, the University of Minnesota, and Kyoto University.

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