The National Research Council in The Innovation Policy Era: Changing Hierarchies, Networks, and Markets

By G. Bruce Doern and Richard Levesque

© 2002

In this first in-depth examination of the governance of the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) in over twenty-five years, G. Bruce Doern and Richard Levesque show how the agency's history is interwoven with the evolution of Canada's economic and industrial development and with the fostering of science at Canada's universities, in industry, and within the federal government. Using a policy and institutional approach, the authors demonstrate the ways in which the NRC has had to simultaneously absorb significant budgetary and personnel cuts and become, in its own structure and operations, an innovating institution that helps support and facilitate an innovating Canadian economy - one increasingly characterized by knowledge-based industries. By reconfiguring itself in terms of its institutional mix of hierarchies, networks, and markets, the NRC has had to confront and change its own traditions, yet maintain itself as a complex government agency that still values research for its own sake as a public good.

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Product Details

  • Series: IPAC Series in Public Management and Governance
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 192 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 0.8in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP000504

  • PUBLISHED MAY 2002

    From: $43.50

    Regular Price: $58.00

    ISBN 9780802035363
  • PUBLISHED APR 2002

    From: $49.50

    Regular Price: $66.00

Quick Overview

The authors show how the NRC’s history is interwoven with the evolution of Canada’s economic and industrial development and with the fostering of science at Canada’s universities, in industry, and within the federal government.

The National Research Council in The Innovation Policy Era: Changing Hierarchies, Networks, and Markets

By G. Bruce Doern and Richard Levesque

© 2002

In this first in-depth examination of the governance of the National Research Council of Canada (NRC) in over twenty-five years, G. Bruce Doern and Richard Levesque show how the agency's history is interwoven with the evolution of Canada's economic and industrial development and with the fostering of science at Canada's universities, in industry, and within the federal government. Using a policy and institutional approach, the authors demonstrate the ways in which the NRC has had to simultaneously absorb significant budgetary and personnel cuts and become, in its own structure and operations, an innovating institution that helps support and facilitate an innovating Canadian economy - one increasingly characterized by knowledge-based industries. By reconfiguring itself in terms of its institutional mix of hierarchies, networks, and markets, the NRC has had to confront and change its own traditions, yet maintain itself as a complex government agency that still values research for its own sake as a public good.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: IPAC Series in Public Management and Governance
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 192 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 0.8in x 9.3in
  • Author Information

    G. Bruce Doern is a professor emeritus in the School of Public Policy and Administration, Carleton University. He is the author and co-author of numerous books on Canadian politics and policy, including Faith and Fear: The Free Trade Story, with Brian Tomlin, and Canadian Public Policy: Ideas, Structure, Process, with Richard Phidd.



    Richard Levesque is a PhD Candidate at the School of Public Policy and Administration, Carleton University.

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