The Social World of the Florentine Humanists, 1390-1460

By Lauro Martines

© 2011

Lauro Martines' exhaustive search of manuscript material in the state archives of Florence is the basis for a fascinating portrayal of representative humanists of the period. The Social World of the Florentine Humanists explores the wealth, family tradition, civic prominence, and intellectual achievements of these individuals while assessing the attitudes of other Florentines towards them. Martines demonstrates that humanists tended to be wealthy educated men from important families, challenging long-held assumptions about the status of humanisits in that society.

First published in 1963, this groundbreaking study provides a detailed picture of the social structure of Florence in the Quattrocento. Martines's work influenced a generation of scholars and illuminated a complex and multifaceted world.

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Product Details

  • Series: RSART: Renaissance Society of America Reprint Text Series
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 440 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.1in x 1.1in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP003168

  • PUBLISHED MAR 2011

    From: $31.46

    Regular Price: $41.95

    ISBN 9781442611825
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    Regular Price: $38.95

Quick Overview

First published in 1963, this groundbreaking study provides a detailed picture of the social structure of Florence in the Quattrocento. Martines's work influenced a generation of scholars and illuminated a complex and multifaceted world.

The Social World of the Florentine Humanists, 1390-1460

By Lauro Martines

© 2011

Lauro Martines' exhaustive search of manuscript material in the state archives of Florence is the basis for a fascinating portrayal of representative humanists of the period. The Social World of the Florentine Humanists explores the wealth, family tradition, civic prominence, and intellectual achievements of these individuals while assessing the attitudes of other Florentines towards them. Martines demonstrates that humanists tended to be wealthy educated men from important families, challenging long-held assumptions about the status of humanisits in that society.

First published in 1963, this groundbreaking study provides a detailed picture of the social structure of Florence in the Quattrocento. Martines's work influenced a generation of scholars and illuminated a complex and multifaceted world.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: RSART: Renaissance Society of America Reprint Text Series
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 440 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.1in x 1.1in x 9.0in
  • Author Information

    Lauro Martines is a professor emeritus at the University of California, Los Angeles.

  • Table of contents

    Contents

    Acknowledgments

    Abbreviation 

    I. Introduction: Program and Problems

    II. Social Place in Florence: Assumptions and Realities

    1. Wealth 
    2. Public Life 
    3. Family: The Significance of a Tradition 
    4. Marriage
    5. Ideal and Reality

    III. The Fortunes of the Florentine Humanists

    1. The Question in Scholarship 
    2. Source Problems
    3. Coluccio Salutati 
    4. Robert de’ Rossi 
    5. Cino Rinuccini
    6. Niccolò Niccoli
    7. Lionardo Bruni
    8. Poggio Bracciolini
    9. Carlo Marsuppini 
    10. Giannozzo Manetti  
    11. Matteo Palmieri  
    12. Leon Battista Alberti 

    IV. Public Office in the Humanist Circle

    1. Introductory Note
    2. Coluccio Salutati and His Sons
    3. Roberto de’ Rossi and Niccolò Niccoli
    4. Lionardo Bruni 
    5. Giannozzo Manetti
    6. Matteo Palmieri 

    V. Humanist Marriage: A Study of Five Families

    1. The Castellani 
    2. The Buondelmonti
    3. The Tebalducci
    4. The Corsini 
    5. The Serragli

    VI. The Florentine Attitude Towards the Humanist 

    1. Introductory Note
    2. The Testimony of the Public Funeral
    3. The Official View Analyzed
    4. “The Honor of Florence” 

    VII. The Relation Between Humanism and Florentine Society: An Essay

    1. Note
    2. A Retrospective Summary
    3. The Social Basis of Humanism: Appendix I 
    4. The Genesis of Civic Humanism 
    5. The Decline of Civic Humanism

    Appendix I. Forty-Five Profiles of Men Connected with Florentine Humanism

    1. Introductory Note 
    2. The Profiles

    Appendix II. Eight Tables on Wealth in Florence 

    Bibliography

    Index

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