The Trial That Never Ends: Hannah Arendt's 'Eichmann in Jerusalem' in Retrospect

Edited by Richard J. Golsan and Sarah M. Misemer

© 2017

The fiftieth anniversary of the Adolf Eichmann trial may have come and gone but in many countries around the world there is a renewed focus on the trial, Eichmann himself, and the nature of his crimes. This increased attention also stimulates scrutiny of Hannah Arendt’s influential and controversial work, Eichmann in Jerusalem.

The contributors gathered together by Richard J. Golsan and Sarah M. Misemer in The Trial That Never Ends assess the contested legacy of Hannah Arendt’s famous book and the issues she raised: the "banality of evil", the possibility of justice in the aftermath of monstrous crimes, the right of Israel to kidnap and judge Eichmann, and the agency and role of victims. The contributors also interrogate Arendt’s own ambivalent attitudes towards race and critically interpret the nature of the crimes Eichmann committed in light of newly discovered Nazi documents. The Trial That Never Ends responds to new scholarship by Deborah Lipstadt, Bettina Stangneth, and Shoshana Felman and offers rich new ground for historical, legal, philosophical, and psychological speculation.

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Product Details

  • Series: German and European Studies
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 272 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
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SKU# SP004525

  • PUBLISHED MAR 2017

    From: $45.75

    Regular Price: $61.00

    ISBN 9781487501464
  • PUBLISHED MAR 2017

    From: $45.75

    Regular Price: $61.00

Quick Overview

The contributors gathered together by Richard J. Golsan and Sarah M. Misemer in The Trial That Never Ends assess the contested legacy of Hannah Arendt’s famous book and the issues she raised.

The Trial That Never Ends: Hannah Arendt's 'Eichmann in Jerusalem' in Retrospect

Edited by Richard J. Golsan and Sarah M. Misemer

© 2017

The fiftieth anniversary of the Adolf Eichmann trial may have come and gone but in many countries around the world there is a renewed focus on the trial, Eichmann himself, and the nature of his crimes. This increased attention also stimulates scrutiny of Hannah Arendt’s influential and controversial work, Eichmann in Jerusalem.

The contributors gathered together by Richard J. Golsan and Sarah M. Misemer in The Trial That Never Ends assess the contested legacy of Hannah Arendt’s famous book and the issues she raised: the "banality of evil", the possibility of justice in the aftermath of monstrous crimes, the right of Israel to kidnap and judge Eichmann, and the agency and role of victims. The contributors also interrogate Arendt’s own ambivalent attitudes towards race and critically interpret the nature of the crimes Eichmann committed in light of newly discovered Nazi documents. The Trial That Never Ends responds to new scholarship by Deborah Lipstadt, Bettina Stangneth, and Shoshana Felman and offers rich new ground for historical, legal, philosophical, and psychological speculation.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: German and European Studies
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 272 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 1.0in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "This is a collection well worth reading..."


    Ned Curthoys, The University of Western Australia
    Arendt Studies, vol. 2, 2018

    "As a reflection of current trends in a variety of disciplines, this essay collection serves as an apt contribution to a debate that, given the multifaceted nature of Arendt’s oeuvre and the pervasiveness of mass violence, is not likely to end any time soon."


    Jürgen Matthäus, Washington, D.C.
    American Historical Review, April 2019

    "The essays in The Trial That Never Ends are interesting, readable, and offer fresh takes on the ongoing controversy surrounding Hannah Arendt’s Eichmann in Jerusalem."


    Lida Maxwell, Associate Professor of Political Science, Trinity College

    "The Trial That Never Ends provides a comprehensive and definitive account of the true historical and philosophic meaning of Hannah Arendt’s Eichmann in Jerusalem. The essays respond to many of the charges levelled in recent years against Arendt and her work. We come to see that Eichmann in Jerusalem was not only a valiant attempt to grapple with the horrific past; it also peered prophetically into the evils that lurked ahead for the Jewish people, the state of Israel and indeed for civilization itself."


    Nalin Ranasinghe, Professor of Philosophy, Assumption College
  • Author Information

    Richard J. Golsan is a University Distinguished Professor in the Department of International Studies at Texas A & M University. He is also the director of the Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research.



    Sarah M. Misemer is an associate professor in the Department of Hispanic Studies at Texas A & M University. She is also the associate director of the Melbern G. Glasscock Center for Humanities Research.

  • Table of contents

    Introduction

    1 Judging the Past: The Eichmann Trial
    Henry Rousso

    2 Eichmann in Jerusalem: Conscience, Normality, and the "Rule of Narrative"
    Dana Villa

    3 Banality, Again
    Daniel Conway

    4 Eichmann on the Stand: Self-Recognition and the Problem of Truth
    Valerie Hartouni

    5. Arendt’s Conservatism and the Eichmann Judgement
    Russell A. Berman

    6 Eichmann’s Victims, Holocaust Historiography, and Victim Testimony
    Carolyn J. Dean

    7. Truth and Judgement in Arendt’s Writing
    Leora Bilsky

    8. Arendt, German Law and the Crime of Atrocity
    Lawrence Douglas

    9. Whose Trial? Adolf Eichmann’s or Hannah Arendt’s? The Eichmann Controversy Revisited
    Seyla Benhabib

    Contributors

    Index

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