The Unfolding of Words: Commentary in the Age of Erasmus

Edited by Judith Rice Henderson

© 2012

Leading sixteenth-century scholars such as Martin Luther and Desiderius Erasmus used print technology to engage in dialogue and debate with authoritative contemporary texts. By what Juan Luis Vives termed 'the unfolding of words,' these humanists gave old works new meanings in brief notes and extensive commentaries, full paraphrases, or translations. This critique challenged the Middle Ages' deference to authors and authorship and resulted in some of the most original thought - and most violent controversy - of the Renaissance and Reformation.

The Unfolding of Words brings together international scholarship to explore crucial changes in writers' interactions with religious and classical texts. This collection focuses particularly on commentaries by Erasmus, contextualizing his Annotations and Paraphrases on the New Testament against broader currents and works by such contemporaries as François Rabelais and Jodocus Badius. The Unfolding of Words tracks humanist explorations of the possibilities of the page that led to the modern dictionary, encyclopedia, and scholarly edition.

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Product Details

  • Series: Erasmus Studies
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 304 pages
  • Illustrations: 16
  • Dimensions: 6.1in x 1.0in x 9.3in
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Quick Overview

The Unfolding of Words brings together international scholarship to explore crucial changes in writers' interactions with religious and classical texts.

The Unfolding of Words: Commentary in the Age of Erasmus

Edited by Judith Rice Henderson

© 2012

Leading sixteenth-century scholars such as Martin Luther and Desiderius Erasmus used print technology to engage in dialogue and debate with authoritative contemporary texts. By what Juan Luis Vives termed 'the unfolding of words,' these humanists gave old works new meanings in brief notes and extensive commentaries, full paraphrases, or translations. This critique challenged the Middle Ages' deference to authors and authorship and resulted in some of the most original thought - and most violent controversy - of the Renaissance and Reformation.

The Unfolding of Words brings together international scholarship to explore crucial changes in writers' interactions with religious and classical texts. This collection focuses particularly on commentaries by Erasmus, contextualizing his Annotations and Paraphrases on the New Testament against broader currents and works by such contemporaries as François Rabelais and Jodocus Badius. The Unfolding of Words tracks humanist explorations of the possibilities of the page that led to the modern dictionary, encyclopedia, and scholarly edition.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Erasmus Studies
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 304 pages
  • Illustrations: 16
  • Dimensions: 6.1in x 1.0in x 9.3in
  • Reviews

    ‘This is an excellent volume — an education for the novice and a provocation to further scholarship to the expert.’
    R. Ward Holder
    Renaissance Quarterly vol 66:04:2013

    ‘The great value of present collection is the degree to which these essays demonstrate the indispensability of commentary in the Renaissance, how integral theories and practices of commentary were to a vibrant intellectual world.’
    Russ Leo
    Sixteenth Century Journal vol 65:02:2014
  • Author Information

    Judith Rice Henderson is a professor in the Department of English and is active in the Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance Studies Program at the University of Saskatchewan.

  • Table of contents

    Preface

    Acknowledgements

    Part One: Genres of Sixteenth-Century Commentary

    One: Theory and Practices of Commentary in the Renaissance
    Jean Céard, Université Paris-Ouest Nanterre La Défense

    Part Two: The Biblical Scholarship of Erasmus

    Two: Erasmus's Paraphrases: A 'New Kind of Commentary'?
    Jean-François Cottier, Université Paris-7 Diderot and Université de Montréal

    Editor's Addendum: Translating an Erasmian Definition of Paraphrase
    Judith Rice Henderson, University of Saskatchewan

    Three: The Actor in the Story: Horizons of Interpretation in Erasmus's Annotations on Luke
    Mark Vessey, University of British Columbia

    Four: The Function of Ambrosiaster in Erasmus's Annotations on the Epistle to the Galatians
    Riemer Faber, University of Waterloo, Ontario

    Five: Erasmus's Biblical Scholarship in the Toronto Project
    Robert D. Sider, Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania and University of Saskatchewan

    Part Three: Religious Contexts of Printed Commentary

    Six: 'Virtual Classroom': Josse Bade's Commentaries for the Pious Reader
    Mark Crane, Nipissing University, North Bay, Ontario

    Seven: Embedded Commentary in Luther's Translation of Romans 3
    Gordon A. Jensen, Lutheran Theological Seminary, Saskatoon

    Eight: Commenting on Hatred of Commentaries: Les Censures des Théologiens Revised by Robert Estienne
    Hélène Cazes, University of Victoria, British Columbia

    Part Four: Developments in Humanist Philology

    Nine: Rabelais's Lost Stratagemata (ca. 1539): A Commentary on Frontinus?
    Claude La Charité, Université du Québec à Rimouski

    Ten: Commentaries on Tacitus by Justus Lipsius: Their Editing and Printing History

    Appendix I: A Survey of Lipsius's Editions of Tacitus (Text and/or Commentary)
    Appendix II: The Praenomen of Tacitus: Why Lipsius Preferred Caius to Publius
    Appendix III: The Annotations in Leiden UL, 762 C 4 as Source of the Curae secundae
    Appendix IV: Lipsius's Evolving Commentaries: Two Examples in the 1585 Edition, Curae secundae, and 1588 Edition

    Jeanine De Landtsheer, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Belgium

    Bibliography

    List of Contributors

    Index

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