The World of the Florentine Renaissance Artist: Projects and Patrons, Workshop and Art Market

By Martin Wackernagel
Translated by Alison Luchs

© 2011

First published in German in 1938 and later translated into English, this classic of Italian Renaissance historiography centres on the relationship between Florentine art and the conditions under which it was created. In rich detail, Martin Wackernagel explores the impact of patronage and function, widespread demand for art, workshop techniques, and businesses practices on artists' lives and the results they achieved

Wackernagel stresses the changing roles of commissions and patrons in the late fourteenth to the early fifteenth centuries, from small-scale enterprise under Lorenzo de Medici to the large-scale development of major Florentine monuments. Through this, he highlights the development of major civic and religious artistic complexes such as the Palazzo Vecchio, the Cathedral and Baptistery, and the convent of Santa Maria Novella. This volume also features a biography of the author and an essay on important later publications related to Wackernagel's themes and arguments.

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Product Details

  • Series: RSART: Renaissance Society of America Reprint Text Series
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 488 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.1in x 1.3in x 9.1in
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SKU# SP003170

  • PUBLISHED MAR 2011

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    Regular Price: $46.95

    ISBN 9781442611849

Quick Overview

Wackernagel stresses the changing roles of commissions and patrons in the late fourteenth to the early fifteenth centuries, from small-scale enterprise under Lorenzo de Medici to the large-scale development of major Florentine monuments.

The World of the Florentine Renaissance Artist: Projects and Patrons, Workshop and Art Market

By Martin Wackernagel
Translated by Alison Luchs

© 2011

First published in German in 1938 and later translated into English, this classic of Italian Renaissance historiography centres on the relationship between Florentine art and the conditions under which it was created. In rich detail, Martin Wackernagel explores the impact of patronage and function, widespread demand for art, workshop techniques, and businesses practices on artists' lives and the results they achieved

Wackernagel stresses the changing roles of commissions and patrons in the late fourteenth to the early fifteenth centuries, from small-scale enterprise under Lorenzo de Medici to the large-scale development of major Florentine monuments. Through this, he highlights the development of major civic and religious artistic complexes such as the Palazzo Vecchio, the Cathedral and Baptistery, and the convent of Santa Maria Novella. This volume also features a biography of the author and an essay on important later publications related to Wackernagel's themes and arguments.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: RSART: Renaissance Society of America Reprint Text Series
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 488 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.1in x 1.3in x 9.1in
  • Author Information

    Martin Wackernagel was professor emeritus of Art History at Münster University (Westfalen).


    Alison Luchs is curator of early European sculpture at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC.

  • Table of contents

    Translator's Acknowledgments

    Translator's Introduction

    Abbreviations

    Author's Preface

    Author's Introduction

    PART I The Commissions

    CHAPTER 1 Great Projects and Work on Them from 1420 to 1530

    • The Duomo and Baptistery
    • The Church and Convent of Santa Maria Novella
    • The Palazzo Vecchio

    CHAPTER 2 Sculptural Commissions

    • Sculpture for Church Buildings
    • Sculpture for Domestic Buildings

    CHAPTER 3 Painting Commissions

    • Wall Painting and Stained Glass in the Interior of Churches and Convent Buildings
    • Panel Painting in Sacred Settings
    • Banners and Vestments
    • Paintings in Domestic Interiors
    • Household Paintings on Wood and Canvas
    • Painting on the Exterior of Buildings and Throughout the Cityscape

    CHAPTER 4 Artistic Participation in the Staging of Public Festivities and Spectacles

    PART II The Patrons

    CHAPTER 5 The City Government and the Guilds

    CHAPTER 6 Private Patronage in the Early and Mid-Quattrocento

    • Representatives of the First Stage of the Early Renaissance
    • Giovanni Rucellai and Cosimo de' Medici
    • Cosimo’s Sons, Piero and Giovanni de' Medici

    Attitudes and Forms of Patronage

    CHAPTER 7 Lorenzo Magnifico, Piero di Lorenzo, and Lorenzo di Pierfrancesco de’ Medici

    CHAPTER 8 Patrons from the Medici Circle in Florence and the Netherlands: the Sassetti, Portinari, Tornabuoni, Filippo Strozzi, and Others

    CHAPTER 9 Patrons of the High Renaissance and Extra-Florentine Commissioners and Collectors

    CHAPTER 10 The General Attitude toward Art: The Public and the Artist

    PART III The Artist’s Workshop and the Art Market

    CHAPTER 11 The Artist Class: Its Numerical Strength, Professional Organization, and Occupational Divisions

    CHAPTER 12 Studios and their Working Procedures

    • Living and Working Places and the Organization of Work: Master, Assistants, and Apprentices
    • The Process of Sculpture
    • The Painter's Working Procedure: Drawing
    • Execution of Panel and Wall Paintings
    • The New Generation of Artists: Training for Apprentices and Assistants

    CHAPTER 13 Business Practices in the Workshop and Art Market

    • Price Formation and Forms of Payment
    • Economic Status of Artists

    CHAPTER 14 The Artists

    • Class Status and Class Consciousness
    • The Artist as a Person, his Social Circle, his Way of Life and Work
    • The Artistic Temperament and Range of Interests
    • The Artistic Type in Contemporary Society

    Author's Bibliography

    Translator's Bibliography

    Index

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