Ultimate Reality and Meaning

Edited by Tom Krettek

Published Quarterly | ISSN 0709-549

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Ultimate Reality and Meaning is published quarterly by an International association of thinkers who have an interest in research on human efforts to find meaning in our world. It publishes studies dealing with those facts, things, ideas, axioms, persons and values which people throughout history have considered ultimate (i.e., that to which human mind reduces and relates everything and that which one does not reduce or relate to anything else) or as horizons (i.e., world views in the light of which humans understand whatever they understand) or as supreme value (i.e., for which someone would sacrifice everything and which one would not lose for anything).

It covers humanity’s entire history, from the earliest preliterate groupings to contemporary society. Beliefs, world views and conceptualizations of an ultimate reality and meaning of human existence will be identified and analyzed through the culture they represent and the period from which they are taken. The analytical and critical description of all that the human mind ever thought about the ultimate reality and meaning of human existence is expected to initiate systematic and structural studies of the most universal dynamics that have driven human consciousness from its dawn until the present day.

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Quick Overview

Ultimate Reality and Meaning is published quarterly by an International association of thinkers who have an interest in research on human efforts to find meaning in our world. It publishes studies dealing with those facts, things, ideas, axioms, persons and values which people throughout history have considered ultimate (i.e., that to which human mind reduces and relates everything and that which one does not reduce or relate to anything else) or as horizons (i.e., world views in the light of which humans understand whatever they understand) or as supreme value (i.e., for which someone would sacrifice everything and which one would not lose for anything).

It covers humanity’s entire history, from the earliest preliterate groupings to contemporary society. Beliefs, world views and conceptualizations of an ultimate reality and meaning of human existence will be identified and analyzed through the culture they represent and the period from which they are taken. The analytical and critical description of all that the human mind ever thought about the ultimate reality and meaning of human existence is expected to initiate systematic and structural studies of the most universal dynamics that have driven human consciousness from its dawn until the present day.

Ultimate Reality and Meaning

Edited by Tom Krettek

Published Quarterly | ISSN 0709-549

Sign up for URAM Alerts

Join the conversation
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Email

Ultimate Reality and Meaning is published quarterly by an International association of thinkers who have an interest in research on human efforts to find meaning in our world. It publishes studies dealing with those facts, things, ideas, axioms, persons and values which people throughout history have considered ultimate (i.e., that to which human mind reduces and relates everything and that which one does not reduce or relate to anything else) or as horizons (i.e., world views in the light of which humans understand whatever they understand) or as supreme value (i.e., for which someone would sacrifice everything and which one would not lose for anything).

It covers humanity’s entire history, from the earliest preliterate groupings to contemporary society. Beliefs, world views and conceptualizations of an ultimate reality and meaning of human existence will be identified and analyzed through the culture they represent and the period from which they are taken. The analytical and critical description of all that the human mind ever thought about the ultimate reality and meaning of human existence is expected to initiate systematic and structural studies of the most universal dynamics that have driven human consciousness from its dawn until the present day.

Continue Reading Read Less
  • Editorial board

    Founding Editor
    Tibor Horvath, S.J.

    Editor-in-Chief
    Thomas Krettek S.J. has a S.T.M. from Regis College of the Toronto School of Theology of the University of Toronto. It was at this time that he first worked with Tibor Horvath and became involved with URAM. He received his PhD in Philosophy from Catholic University of America where he wrote his dissertation on the relation between the metaphysics and political philosophy of Paul Weiss. He taught philosophy in Nairobi, Kenya before joining the philosophy faculty at Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska, where he also served as Director of the Jesuit Humanities Program. In 2000 he joined the philosophy department at Marquette University and taught at Marquette for five years. In 2012 he became the Loyola Chair Holder and Visiting Associate Professor of Philosophy at Fordham, where he also serves as Director of the Master of Arts (Philosophical Resources) Program. He has served as Philosophy Section Editor for the URAM Journal and President of the URAM Society.

    Editorial Address
    Tom Krettek S.J.
    Philosophy Department
    Collins Hall Room B27
    Fordham University
    441 East Fordham Road
    Bronx, NY 10458
    USA
    Phone: 718-817-5896
    Fax: 718-817-3300

    Co-Editor
    Stephen M. Modell
    University of Michigan
    4605 SPH Tower, 109 S. Observatory
    Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029
    Tel (734) 615-3141
    Fax. (734) 764-1357
    E-mail: mod@umich.edu

    Associate Editor
    David J. Leigh S.J.
    Seattle University
    901 12th Ave. CASEY 502
    Seattle, WA 98122 USA
    Tel (206) 296-5414
    Fax (206) 296-5997
    E-mail: dleigh@seattleu.edu

    Associate Editor
    Mark DeStephano, S.J.
    Department of Modern and Classical Languages and Literature
    Saint Peter's University
    2641 John F. Kennedy Blvd.
    Jersey City, NJ 07306
    201-761-6232
    mdestephano@saintpeters.edu

    Section Edtiors
    African Studies

    Eugene Goussikindy SJ
    Hekima College Jesuit School of Theology
    P.O. Box 21215
    Nairobi, Kenya

    American Literature
    Adam Crowley
    Husson University
    1 College Circle
    Bangor, ME 04401

    Anthropological Studies
    Thomas Bargatzy
    Universitait Bayreuth
    Geschwister-School-Platz 3
    8580 Bayreuth
    Germany

    Biochemistry
    George Panco
    8 rue Bochart de Saron
    75009 Paris
    France

    Biology
    Joseph Svoboda
    University of Toronto
    Erindale Campus
    Mississauga, ON L5L 1C6
    Canada

    Chemistry
    Allen R. Utke
    University of Wisconsin
    Oshkosh, WI 54901-8645
    USA

    Computer Studies
    Julia A. Johnson
    Laurentian University
    Sudbury, ON
    P3E 2C6
    Canada

    Economics
    Abraham Rotstein
    University of Toronto
    Toronto, ON
    M5S 1A1
    Canada

    English Literature
    David J. Leigh
    Seattle University
    Seattle, WA 98112-4340
    USA

    Genome Studies
    Stephen M. Modell
    University of Michigan,
    School of Public Health,
    4605 SPH-I Tower,
    109 S. Observatory,
    Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029
    USA

    Hellenic and Roman Classic Studies
    David Sider
    Fordham University
    Bronx, NY 10485-5154
    USA

    History
    Terence J. Fay
    Toronto School of Theology/UT
    10 St. Mary Street,Suite 508
    Toronto, ON M4Y 1P9
    Canada

    Hindu Studies
    Shiv Talwar
    408 Tamarack Drive
    Waterloo, ON N2L 2G6
    Canada

    Legal Studies
    D. Mclean
    25 Main St. W. Suite 2100
    Hamilton, ON L8P 1H1
    Canada

    Media Studies
    Anthony Cristiano
    Digital Media and Journalism Programs
    Wilfrid Laurier University
    73 George Street
    Brantford, ON N3T 2Y3
    Canada

    Nahua Studies
    James Maffie
    Colorado State University
    Fort Collins, CO 80523-1781
    USA

    Neurophysiology
    Andrew B. Newberg
    1750 Oakwood Terrace, #16H
    Penn Valley, PA 19072
    USA

    Philosophy
    Lisa O’Neill
    Saint Peter’s University
    Jersey City, NJ 07306-4606
    USA

    Physics
    A.A. Berezin
    McMaster University
    Hamilton, ON L8S 4L7
    Canada

    Psychology
    J.G. Schner
    Regis College
    15 St. Mary St.
    Toronto, ON M4Y 1R5
    Canada

    Religious Studies
    Gerhold K. Becker
    Hong Kong Baptist University
    Kowloon Tong
    Hong Kong, China

    Roman Classical Studies
    David Sider
    New York University
    25 Waverly Place
    New York, NY 10003
    USA

    Semiotics
    A. Makolkin
    Frank Iacobucci Centre for Italian Canadian Studies
    University of Toronto
    100 St. Joseph St.
    Toronto, ON M5S 1J4
    Canada

    Sociobiology
    Marcel Roele
    European Sociobiological Society
    Meeuwenlaan 111a 1021 HX
    Amsterdam, The Netherlands

    Spanish Studies
    Mark DeStephano, S.J.
    St. Peter's College
    Jersey City, NJ 07306-4606
    USA

    Theological Studies
    Hans Weldenfels
    Universitat Bonn
    5300 Bonn 1
    Germany

  • Abstracting and indexing

  • Author resources

    Ultimate Reality and Meaning Submission Guidelines

    Notes for Contributors
    It is recommended that potential contributors first write either to the editor or to the section editor to determine whether or not the subjects on which they wish to write have already been assigned.

    Contributions concerning methods and approaches for studying the areas under discussion are desired.

    Structural and systematic reflection on the articles already published in the journal are welcome.

    Reviews and assessments of articles published in the journal are invited in order to stimulate further research. Such reviews and assessments will form the content of a special section called Reviews and Evaluations of Articles. Contributors are requested to follow the following guidelines for content and format:

    Content:
    Essential Information

      (a) if about a man or woman: date and country of birth; geographical and historical setting; education; major influences; important stages in life and thought; influence, important writings and publications (commentaries, studies, books or articles).
      (b) if about doctrine, system of ideas and/or school: definitions; leading exponents, most important ideas; historical period of influence; listing of important writings and commentaries on the doctrine, system and school.
      (c) if about tribes, peoples or countries: name and geographical setting; history of studies and sources; origin and history; major influences, social structure, commerce, industry, government, language, religion, art, music, etc., influence on other people, contributions, questions to be studied, description of how life is seen by the group; description of the corresponding symbols, images and the network of their correlative function, description of how the group tries to survive by adapting itself to or by manipulating the patterns of life.
    Ultimate Reality and Meaning of Subject Matter Studies in Depth and Social Impact
      (a) description and definition of important names, terms, symbols, metaphors used to express ultimate reality and meaning of human existence.
      (b) elaboration of basic idea or ideas: here the contributor should be guided by such questions as:
      • Is the ultimate reality and meaning dealt with directly or indirectly?
      • How is it expressed: as space model, e.g., milieu, horizon, context, etc.: time model, e.g. origin, cause, ultimate, final, etc.: person model, e.g. God, spirit, spirits, etc.?
      • What is the final horizon, the central idea in terms of which the meaning of human existence is understood?
      • What is the conception of the universe, its origin and destiny, if there is one? What is the role of man/woman, his/her moral ends and moral relations to the universe and its creator(s), if any, or to the totality of existence?
      • What is the logicogenetic development of what is taken as ultimate? Are these ideas original or derivative? If derivative, from whom and how?
      • What is the meaning of the universe? What is the meaning of human existence? What does man/woman expect from life? What are the desires man/woman expects to be fulfilled (e.g. to harmonize the world? to live forever? to enable family, clan, society continue to survive? to be united with God or with the universe? etc.)
      • What is the relation between the desires, the reality in which man lives and the heaven to which he wants to go?
      • How is happiness or a better future visualized? What is man/woman expected to do to reach the desired happiness?
      • In what context do such desires make sense and in what context do they not? Do these ideas contribute to a greater and deeper understanding of the ultimate reality and meaning of human existence or experience?

    The contributor should not dwell on beliefs incidental to these ultimates, unless for understanding them. It is also expected that he/she will criticize and evaluate these basic ideas.

    Format:

    1.Manuscripts: A letter-perfect manuscript should be submitted in triplicate to the relevant Section Editor or to the Editor. The manuscript will be sent out to two or three scholars for comment. The comment and the author’s reply might be published in the journal. The format for manuscripts submitted after January 2012 is to be in accord with the MLA Stylesheet. The use of inclusive language, when appropriate and possible, is requested.

    2.Language: English is the preferred language. All articles should be submitted in English, but other languages will be used in the case of exceptional papers where English submission is difficult.

    3.Length: Preferred maximum length of any article is 40 doublespaced pages.

    4.References:
      (a) References should be included in the text within parentheses and arranged as in this example: (Hartshorne 156-158). Neither footnotes nor endnotes are to be used
      (b) All references should be listed alphabetically at the end of the manuscript under Works Cited. Author, title, publisher, date should be arranged as in the following examples:

    Book:

    Hartshorne, Charles. The Divine Relativity. A Social Conception of God. 3rd edition. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1967.

    Article:

    Horvath, Tibor. “Encyclopedia of Human Ideas on Ultimate Reality and Meaning: A Plan for a New Encyclopedia.” Revue de l’Universite d’ Ottawa. 39 (1969): 94-106.

    5.Abstracts:

    Every contributor should include with his manuscript a short abstract limited to 250 words and a glossary, i.e. an indication of the specific interpretation he gives to all the key terms (e.g. 'mana', systems analysis, etc.) used in that particular area of research. Finally a short introduction about the contributor is also requested.

    http://matrix.scranton.edu/uram/

    6.Electronic format:

    When the article is accepted for publication the authors is asked to provide the Editor, by email or on CD, with a MS Word document (.doc) or Rich Text File (.rft) of it.

    7. Page proofs, reprints:

    The contributor will receive page proofs. For other than printer’s errors, changes in page proofs in excess of 10% will be charged to the contributor. Each author (or main authors of a multi-authored work) will receive five complementary copies of the issues in which his/her article appears. Offprints may be ordered directly from the publisher.

  • Permission information

    For Rights and Permissions inquiries please contact the editor:
    Tom Krettek, S.J.
    Philosophy Department
    Collins Hall Room B27
    Fordham University
    441 East Fordham Road
    Bronx, NY, 10458
    USA
    Phone: 718-817-5896
    Fax: 718-817-3300