What Has No Place, Remains: The Challenges for Indigenous Religious Freedom in Canada Today

By Nicholas Shrubsole

© 2019

The desire to erase the religions of Indigenous Peoples is an ideological fixture of the colonial project that marked the first century of Canada’s nationhood. While the ban on certain Indigenous religious practices was lifted after the Second World War, it was not until 1982 that Canada recognized Aboriginal rights, constitutionally protecting the diverse cultures of Indigenous Peoples. As former prime minister Stephen Harper stated in Canada’s apology for Indian residential schools, the desire to destroy Indigenous cultures, including religions, has no place in Canada today. And yet Indigenous religions continue to remain under threat.

Framed through a postcolonial lens, What Has No Place, Remains analyses state actions, responses, and decisions on matters of Indigenous religious freedom. The book is particularly concerned with legal cases, such as Ktunaxa Nation v. British Columbia (2017), but also draws on political negotiations, such as those at Voisey’s Bay, and standoffs, such as the one at Gustafsen Lake, to generate a more comprehensive picture of the challenges for Indigenous religious freedom beyond Canada’s courts. With particular attention to cosmologically significant space, this book provides the first comprehensive assessment of the conceptual, cultural, political, social, and legal reasons why religious freedom for Indigenous Peoples is currently an impossibility in Canada.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 280 pages
  • Dimensions: 5.9in x 0.8in x 9.0in
Product Formats

SaveUP TO 9239

Book Formats

SKU# SP005406

  • PUBLISHED AUG 2019

    From: $21.71

    Regular Price: $28.95

    ISBN 9781487523442
  • PUBLISHED AUG 2019

    From: $48.75

    Regular Price: $65.00

    ISBN 9781487504700
  • PUBLISHED JUL 2019

    From: $21.71

    Regular Price: $28.95

Quick Overview

This book brings into focus the network of historical, social, conceptual, and legal contingences that impede the realization of Indigenous religious freedom in Canada today.

What Has No Place, Remains: The Challenges for Indigenous Religious Freedom in Canada Today

By Nicholas Shrubsole

© 2019

The desire to erase the religions of Indigenous Peoples is an ideological fixture of the colonial project that marked the first century of Canada’s nationhood. While the ban on certain Indigenous religious practices was lifted after the Second World War, it was not until 1982 that Canada recognized Aboriginal rights, constitutionally protecting the diverse cultures of Indigenous Peoples. As former prime minister Stephen Harper stated in Canada’s apology for Indian residential schools, the desire to destroy Indigenous cultures, including religions, has no place in Canada today. And yet Indigenous religions continue to remain under threat.

Framed through a postcolonial lens, What Has No Place, Remains analyses state actions, responses, and decisions on matters of Indigenous religious freedom. The book is particularly concerned with legal cases, such as Ktunaxa Nation v. British Columbia (2017), but also draws on political negotiations, such as those at Voisey’s Bay, and standoffs, such as the one at Gustafsen Lake, to generate a more comprehensive picture of the challenges for Indigenous religious freedom beyond Canada’s courts. With particular attention to cosmologically significant space, this book provides the first comprehensive assessment of the conceptual, cultural, political, social, and legal reasons why religious freedom for Indigenous Peoples is currently an impossibility in Canada.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 280 pages
  • Dimensions: 5.9in x 0.8in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "There is no book that takes on the ambitious task that What Has No Place, Remains does, especially in the context of Canada and the Indigenous practices and beliefs linking Indigenous People to the land."


    Michael McNally, Department of Religion, Carleton College

    "Working at the intersection of religious, political, legal, and Indigenous studies, this book’s multi-disciplinary framework yields numerous insights, both analytically and prescriptively."


    Greg Johnson, Department of Religious Studies, University of Colorado Boulder
  • Author Information

    Nicholas Shrubsole is a lecturer in the Department of Philosophy at the University of Central Florida.
  • Table of contents

    Abbreviations
    Preface
    A Comment on Terminology

    Introduction: Colonialism and the Challenges for Religious Freedom 

    1. The Depth of Religious Freedom 
    2. Secularization, Dispossession and Forced Deprivatization 
    3. Religions Plus? Competing Frameworks of Indigenous Religious Freedom 
    4. Dealing with Diversity Poorly and the Gustafsen Lake Standoff 
    5. The Duty to Consult and Accommodate 
    6. The Potential and Limits of International Mechanisms of Redress 

    Conclusion: Challenges for Reconciliation 

    Notes 
    Bibliography

Related Titles