A Moralist In and Out of Parliament: John Stuart Mill at Westminster, 1865-1868

By Bruce L. Kinzer, Ann P. Robson, and John M. Robson

© 1992

When John Stuart Mill was elected in the "blue-ribbon" liberal constituency of Westminster, there was great interest in seeing how a man of intellect would stand the practical political test. The watershed parliament of 1865-8 in which he served saw the growing polarization of politics between the new Liberal Party and the Conservatives. Mill gained greater eminence - and notoriety - by promoting women's suffrage, proportional and working-class representation, Irish land reform, and racial justice, and generall attempting to radicalize the Liberal party. But in 1868 he was defeated in controversial circumstances, and returned to private life.

This detailed study places the political and personal beliefs and behaviour of Britain's leading philosopher in the context of the crucial changes resulting from the growing democratization of society and culture in Britain. His electorial triumph and subsequent defeat ate studies as revealing both individual character and public perception. Central is the effect on Mill's reputation of his insistence on moral principle in tension with flexible political pragmatism. The authors also cast light on election campaigning in a key urban constituency being transformed from a radical stronghold to a conservative bastion.

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Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 317 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 1.1in x 9.3in
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SKU# SP001416

  • PUBLISHED APR 1992

    From: $70.50

    Regular Price: $94.00

    ISBN 9780802059499

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This detailed study places the political and personal beliefs and behaviour of Britain's leading philosopher in the context of the crucial changes resulting from the growing democratization of society and culture in Britain.

A Moralist In and Out of Parliament: John Stuart Mill at Westminster, 1865-1868

By Bruce L. Kinzer, Ann P. Robson, and John M. Robson

© 1992

When John Stuart Mill was elected in the "blue-ribbon" liberal constituency of Westminster, there was great interest in seeing how a man of intellect would stand the practical political test. The watershed parliament of 1865-8 in which he served saw the growing polarization of politics between the new Liberal Party and the Conservatives. Mill gained greater eminence - and notoriety - by promoting women's suffrage, proportional and working-class representation, Irish land reform, and racial justice, and generall attempting to radicalize the Liberal party. But in 1868 he was defeated in controversial circumstances, and returned to private life.

This detailed study places the political and personal beliefs and behaviour of Britain's leading philosopher in the context of the crucial changes resulting from the growing democratization of society and culture in Britain. His electorial triumph and subsequent defeat ate studies as revealing both individual character and public perception. Central is the effect on Mill's reputation of his insistence on moral principle in tension with flexible political pragmatism. The authors also cast light on election campaigning in a key urban constituency being transformed from a radical stronghold to a conservative bastion.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 317 pages
  • Dimensions: 6.2in x 1.1in x 9.3in
  • Author Information

    Bruce L. Kinzer is Professor and Chair of the History Department at Kenyon College.



    Ann P. Robson is a professor emeritus in the Department of History at the University of Toronto.



    JOHN M. ROBSON was born educated in Toronto, graduating from the University of Toronto (B.A. 1951, M.A. 1953, PH.D. 1956). After lecturing at the University of British Columbia and the University of Alberta, he joined the staff as Victoria College, University of Toronto, where he is now Professor of English. He is Associate Editor of the Collected Works of John Stuart Mill, and he also edited Edmund Burke’s Appel from the New to the Old Whigs, J.S. Mill: A Selection, and Editing Nineteenth-Century Texts.

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