A Poetry of Things: The Material Lyric in Habsburg Spain

By Mary E. Barnard

© 2022

A Poetry of Things examines the works of four poets whose use of visual and material culture contributed to the remarkable artistic and literary production during the reign of Philip III (1598–1621). Francisco de Quevedo, Luis de Góngora, Juan de Arguijo, and Luisa de Carvajal y Mendoza cast cultural objects – ranging from books and tombstones to urban ruins, sculptures, and portraits – as participants in lively interactions with their readers and viewers across time and space.

Mary E. Barnard argues that in their dialogic performance, these objects serve as sites of inquiry for exploring contemporary political, social, and religious issues, such as the preservation of humanist learning in an age of print, the collapse of empires and the rebirth of the city, and the visual culture of the Counter-Reformation. Her inspired readings explain how the performance of cultural objects, whether they remain in situ or are displayed in a library, museum, or convent, is the most compelling.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Toronto Iberic
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 208 pages
  • Illustrations: 24
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
Product Formats

SaveUP TO 9239

Book Formats

SKU# SP006606

  • AVAILABLE SEP 2021

    From: $37.50

    Regular Price: $50.00

    ISBN 9781487509187
  • AVAILABLE SEP 2021

    From: $37.50

    Regular Price: $50.00

Quick Overview

A Poetry of Things considers how cultural objects were used by poets in the years around 1600 – a time of social and economic crisis, but also of remarkable artistic and literary production.

A Poetry of Things: The Material Lyric in Habsburg Spain

By Mary E. Barnard

© 2022

A Poetry of Things examines the works of four poets whose use of visual and material culture contributed to the remarkable artistic and literary production during the reign of Philip III (1598–1621). Francisco de Quevedo, Luis de Góngora, Juan de Arguijo, and Luisa de Carvajal y Mendoza cast cultural objects – ranging from books and tombstones to urban ruins, sculptures, and portraits – as participants in lively interactions with their readers and viewers across time and space.

Mary E. Barnard argues that in their dialogic performance, these objects serve as sites of inquiry for exploring contemporary political, social, and religious issues, such as the preservation of humanist learning in an age of print, the collapse of empires and the rebirth of the city, and the visual culture of the Counter-Reformation. Her inspired readings explain how the performance of cultural objects, whether they remain in situ or are displayed in a library, museum, or convent, is the most compelling.

Continue Reading Read Less

Product Details

  • Series: Toronto Iberic
  • World Rights
  • Page Count: 208 pages
  • Illustrations: 24
  • Dimensions: 6.0in x 0.0in x 9.0in
  • Reviews

    "Drawing on an intimate knowledge of early modern poetry and the visual arts, Barnard reveals the networks that connect word and image in the Spanish Baroque. With clarity and precision, she illuminates the staggering range of Classical and Renaissance cultural artifacts in of dialogue with selected works by two well-known poets connected with the court: Luis de Góngora and Francisco de Quevedo, and two who deserve more attention: the Sevillian Juan de Arguijo and Luisa de Carvajal y Mendoza, a mystical Catholic poet in England. Barnard's discussion of Arguijo's mythological decoration for his academia's meeting room is a tour de force of ekphrastic analysis. Against a historical background of poems, paintings, sculpture, architecture, Barnard engages concepts of time, interiority and exteriority, voice and body, nature and art, violence, religious devotion, and eroticism. More than recreating the ideal seventeenth-century readers’ imaginative background for reading these poems, Barnard redefines the concept of material culture for early modern studies."


    Emilie L. Bergmann, Professor of Spanish Emerita, University of California, Berkeley
  • Author Information

    Mary E. Barnard is an associate professor of Spanish and Comparative Literature at Pennsylvania State University.
  • Table of contents

    Acknowledgments
    List of Illustrations
    Preface

    1. Objects as Mediators

    2. Material Rome  

    3. Producing Pastoral Spaces

    4. Staging Myth 

    5. A Mystic and Her Objects                      

    Notes 
    Works Cited
    Index

By the Same Author(s)

Related Titles